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  1. Primary Students’ Scientific Reasoning and Discourse During Cooperative Inquiry-Based Science Activities.Robyn M. Gillies, Kim Nichols, Gilbert Burgh & Michele Haynes - 2013 - International Journal of Educational Research 63:127–140.
    Teaching children to ask and answer questions is critically important if they are to learn to talk and reason effectively together, particularly during inquiry-based science where they are required to investigate topics, consider alternative propositions and hypotheses, and problem-solve together to propose answers, explanations, and prediction to problems at hand. This study involved 108 students (53 boys and 55 girls) from seven, Year 7 teachers’ classrooms in five primary schools in Brisbane, Australia. Teachers were randomly allocated by school to one (...)
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    Promoting Problem-Solving and Reasoning During Cooperative Inquiry Science.Robyn M. Gillies, Kim Nichols & Gilbert Burgh - 2011 - Teaching Education 22 (4):429–445.
    This paper reports on a study that was conducted on the effects of training students in specific strategic and meta-cognitive questioning strategies on the development of reasoning, problem-solving, and learning during cooperative inquiry-based science activities. The study was conducted in 18 sixth grade classrooms and involved 35 groups of students in three conditions: the cognitive questioning condition; the Philosophy for Children condition; and the comparison condition. The students were videotaped as they worked on a specific inquiry-science task once each term (...)
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  3. The Effects of Two Strategic and Meta-Cognitive Questioning Approaches on Children’s Explanatory Behaviour, Problem-Solving, and Learning During Cooperative, Inquiry-Based Science.Robyn M. Gillies, Kim Nichols, Gilbert Burgh & Michele Haynes - 2012 - International Journal of Educational Research 53:93–106.
    Teaching students to ask and answer questions is critically important if they are to engage in reasoned argumentation, problem-solving, and learning. This study involved 35 groups of grade 6 children from 18 classrooms in three conditions (cognitive questioning condition, community of inquiry condition, and the comparison condition) who were videotaped as they worked on specific inquiry-based science tasks. The study also involved the teachers in these classrooms who were audio-taped as they interacted with the children during these tasks. The results (...)
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