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  1.  24
    Health Misinformation and the Power of Narrative Messaging in the Public Sphere.Timothy Caulfield, Alessandro R. Marcon, Blake Murdoch, Jasmine M. Brown, Sarah Tinker Perrault, Jonathan Jarry, Jeremy Snyder, Samantha J. Anthony, Stephanie Brooks, Zubin Master, Christen Rachul, Ubaka Ogbogu, Joshua Greenberg, Amy Zarzeczny & Robyn Hyde-Lay - 2019 - Canadian Journal of Bioethics / Revue canadienne de bioéthique 2 (2):52-60.
    Numerous social, economic and academic pressures can have a negative impact on representations of biomedical research. We review several of the forces playing an increasingly pernicious role in how health and science information is interpreted, shared and used, drawing discussions towards the role of narrative. In turn, we explore how aspects of narrative are used in different social contexts and communication environments, and present creative responses that may help counter the negative trends. As traditional methods of communication have in many (...)
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  2.  42
    Policy recommendations for addressing privacy challenges associated with cell-based research and interventions.Ubaka Ogbogu, Sarah Burningham, Adam Ollenberger, Kathryn Calder, Li Du, Khaled El Emam, Robyn Hyde-Lay, Rosario Isasi, Yann Joly, Ian Kerr, Bradley Malin, Michael McDonald, Steven Penney, Gayle Piat, Denis-Claude Roy, Jeremy Sugarman, Suzanne Vercauteren, Griet Verhenneman, Lori West & Timothy Caulfield - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):7.
    The increased use of human biological material for cell-based research and clinical interventions poses risks to the privacy of patients and donors, including the possibility of re-identification of individuals from anonymized cell lines and associated genetic data. These risks will increase as technologies and databases used for re-identification become affordable and more sophisticated. Policies that require ongoing linkage of cell lines to donors’ clinical information for research and regulatory purposes, and existing practices that limit research participants’ ability to control what (...)
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  3.  46
    Technology assessment and resource allocation for predictive genetic testing: A study of the perspectives of Canadian genetic health care providers.Alethea Adair, Robyn Hyde-Lay, Edna Einsiedel & Timothy Caulfield - 2009 - BMC Medical Ethics 10 (1):6-.
    With a growing number of genetic tests becoming available to the health and consumer markets, genetic health care providers in Canada are faced with the challenge of developing robust decision rules or guidelines to allocate a finite number of public resources. The objective of this study was to gain Canadian genetic health providers' perspectives on factors and criteria that influence and shape resource allocation decisions for publically funded predictive genetic testing in Canada. The authors conducted semi-structured interviews with 16 senior (...)
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