Results for 'Robin S. O'Regan'

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  1. Law and Human Values.Robin S. O'Regan - 1976 - Univeristy of Queensland Press.
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  2. Discussion of J. Kevin O’Regan’s “Why Red Doesn’t Sound Like a Bell: Understanding the Feel of Consciousness”.J. Kevin O’Regan & Ned Block - 2012 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (1):89-108.
    Discussion of J. Kevin O’Regan’s “Why Red Doesn’t Sound Like a Bell: Understanding the Feel of Consciousness” Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-20 DOI 10.1007/s13164-012-0090-7 Authors J. Kevin O’Regan, Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception, CNRS - Université Paris Descartes, Centre Biomédical des Saints Pères, 45 rue des Sts Pères, 75270 Paris cedex 06, France Ned Block, Departments of Philosophy, Psychology and Center for Neural Science, New York University, 5 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003, USA Journal Review of Philosophy and (...)
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  3.  28
    Cyril O’Regan, The Anatomy of Misremembering : Von Balthasar’s Response to Philosophical Modernity, Vol. I, Hegel. New York, The Crossroad Publishing Company , 2014, 528 p.Cyril O’Regan, The Anatomy of Misremembering : Von Balthasar’s Response to Philosophical Modernity, Vol. I, Hegel. New York, The Crossroad Publishing Company , 2014, 528 p. [REVIEW]George J. Seidel - 2015 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 71 (3):558-560.
  4.  9
    Cyril O’Regan. The Anatomy of Misremembering: Von Balthasar’s Response to Philosophical Modernity—Volume 1: Hegel. The Crossroads Publishing Company, 2013. ISBN 978-0-8245-2562-0 . Pp. 678. $39.95. [REVIEW]Matthew M. Peters - 2017 - Hegel Bulletin 38 (1):188-192.
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  5.  40
    Žižek's Meontology: An Inflected Hegel and the Possibility of Theology.Cyril O'Regan - 2014 - Modern Theology 30 (4):600-611.
  6.  43
    Reply to philipona and O'Regan.Wayne Wright & Kent Johnson - manuscript
    This paper responds to Philipona & O’Regan (2006), which attempts to account for certain color phenomena by appeal to singularities in the space of “accessible information” in the light striking the retina. Three points are discussed. First, it is unclear what the empirical significance/import is of the mathematical analysis of the data regarding the accessible information in the light. Second, the singularity index employed in the study is both mathematically and empirically faulty. Third, the connection drawn between their findings and (...)
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  7.  70
    Newman’s Rhetoric in the Apologia pro vita sua.Cyril O’Regan - 2011 - The Lonergan Review 3 (1):88-101.
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  8. Picture changes during blinks: Looking without seeing and seeing without looking.J. Kevin O'Regan, H. Deubel, James J. Clark & Ronald A. Rensink - 2000 - Visual Cognition 7:191-211.
    Observers inspected normal, high quality color displays of everyday visual scenes while their eye movements were recorded. A large display change occurred each time an eye blink occurred. Display changes could either involve "Central Interest" or "Marginal Interest" locations, as determined from descriptions obtained from independent judges in a prior pilot experiment. Visual salience, as determined by luminance, color, and position of the Central and Marginal interest changes were equalized. -/- The results obtained were very similar to those obtained in (...)
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  9.  18
    Robert Williams’s Hegelian God.Cyril O'Regan - 2017 - The Owl of Minerva 49 (1):107-135.
    This essay focuses on the way Williams elaborates, defends, and recommends Hegel’s revision of Christianity, which makes possible a Christianity free from the defects of its pre-modern form without collapsing into atheism and humanism. The essay begins by examining the development of Williams’s case in Hegel on the Proofs and Personhood of God and in Tragedy, Recognition, and the Death of God. This examination shows that Williams uses Hegel’s critique of pre-modern Christianity to demonstrate that modernity, in which discourse, practices, (...)
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  10.  41
    The Impossibility of a Christian Reading of the Phenomenology of Spirit: H. S. Harris on Hegel’s Liquidation of Christianity.Cyril O’Regan - 2001 - The Owl of Minerva 33 (1):45-95.
    H. S. Harris’s Hegel’s Ladder opens up the epic universe of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit by constructing a text that is epic in its dimensions and self-conscious design. It aims at truth. In the first instance, this means adequacy with respect to the Phenomenology ’s epic account of humanity’s movement toward self-certain truth. In the second instance, it means correspondence to the epic design of the Phenomenology. For Harris, it is self-evident that the Phenomenology belongs to the genre of epic, (...)
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  11.  48
    Philosophy of Religion in the Context of Hegel’s Philosophy: Challenges and Prospects.Cyril O'Regan - 2006 - The Owl of Minerva 37 (1):9-28.
    This paper understands Hodgson’s Hegel and Christian Theology not only to represent the definitive expression of a distinguished Hegel scholar’s theological interpretation, but also to mark a threshold between where Hegel studies have been on the topic of the relation between religion and philosophy in Hegel’s thought and where they are going. On the threshold, Hodgson’s text faces three essential challenges with respect to its bona fides. The first challenge is whether, even if the privileged status of the Lectures on (...)
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  12.  17
    Divine Subjectivity: Understanding Hegel’s Philosophy of Religion.Cyril O’Regan - 1991 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 65 (4):518-521.
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  13. How to Build a Robot that is Conscious and Feels.J. Kevin O’Regan - 2012 - Minds and Machines 22 (2):117-136.
    Following arguments put forward in my book (Why red doesn’t sound like a bell: understanding the feel of consciousness. Oxford University Press, New York, USA, 2011), this article takes a pragmatic, scientist’s point of view about the concepts of consciousness and “feel”, pinning down what people generally mean when they talk about these concepts, and then investigating to what extent these capacities could be implemented in non-biological machines. Although the question of “feel”, or “phenomenal consciousness” as it is called by (...)
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  14.  22
    The Human Shape of God: Religion in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit. [REVIEW]Cyril O’Regan - 1997 - International Studies in Philosophy 29 (4):124-125.
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  15.  17
    The poetics of Ethos: William Desmond's poetic refiguration of plato.Cyril O'regan - 2001 - Ethical Perspectives 8 (4):272-306.
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  16.  46
    The Ethics of Intercultural Communication.Malcolm N. MacDonald & John P. O’Regan - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (10):1005-1017.
    For some time, the role of culture in language education within schools, universities and professional communication has received increasing attention. This article identifies two aporias in the discourse of intercultural communication : first, that it contains an unstated movement towards a universal consciousness; second, that its claims to truth are grounded in an implicit appeal to a transcendental moral signified.These features constitute IC discourse as ‘totality’, or as ‘metaphysics of presence’.The article draws on the work of Levinas ; and Derrida (...)
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  17.  8
    How the Sensorimotor Approach to Consciousness Bridges Both Comparative and Absolute Explanatory Gaps: And Some Refinements of the Theory.J. K. O'Regan - 2016 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 23 (5-6):39-65.
    The problem of understanding how physical processes in the brain could give rise to consciousness has been identified with the 'comparative explanatory gap', the problem of explaining why different experiences have the differing qualities they do, and the 'absolute explanatory gap', the problem of explaining why anything can be conscious at all. The main innovation of the sensorimotor theory is that it provides a very appealing way of closing the comparative gap by postulating that the quality of experiences corresponds to (...)
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  18.  49
    Virtual action: O'Regan & noë meet Bergson.Stephen E. Robbins - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):906-907.
    Bergson, writing in 1896, anticipated “sensorimotor contingencies” under the concept that perception is “virtual action.” But to explain the external image, he embedded this concept in a holographic framework where time-motion is an indivisible and the relation of subject/object is in terms of time. The target article's account of qualitative visual experience falls short for lack of this larger framework. [Objects] send back, then, to my body, as would a mirror, their eventual influence; they take rank in an order corresponding (...)
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  19.  25
    Phenomenal consciousness lite: No thanks!J. Kevin O'Regan & Erik Myin - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5-6):520-521.
    The target article appeals to recent empirical data to support the idea that there is more to phenomenality than is available to access consciousness. However, this claim is based on an unwarranted assumption, namely, that some kind of cortical processing must be phenomenal. The article also considerably weakens Block's original distinction between a truly nonfunctional phenomenal consciousness and a functional access consciousness. The new form of phenomenal consciousness seems to be a poor-man's cognitive access.
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  20.  92
    Toward an Analytic Phenomenology: The Concepts of "Bodiliness" and "Grabbiness".Kevin J. O'Regan, Erik Myin & No - 2001 - In A. Carsetti (ed.), Seeing and Thinking. Reflections on Kanizsa's Studies in Visual Cognition. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    In this paper, we present an account of phenomenal con- sciousness. Phenomenal consciousness is experience, and the _problem _of phenomenal consciousness is to explain how physical processes.
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  21.  68
    Hegel and the Hermetic Tradition.Cyril O’Regan - 2003 - The Owl of Minerva 34 (2):197-208.
    One honors a book by straightforwardly recommending it to the reader’s attention. But one also honors a book by taking it seriously enough to imagine how it could have been otherwise, or perhaps better, to the extent that one celebrates its existence, one honors it by imagining a supplement. In what follows I will honor this book in both ways, although clearly the first way is primitive. For it is only by one’s attention being grabbed by a text, by one’s (...)
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  22.  23
    John Henry Newman and the Argument of Holiness.Cyril O'regan - 2012 - Newman Studies Journal 9 (1):52-74.
    This essay examines Newman’s life-long campaign against the errors of liberal religion, particularly its “anti-holiness” principle that rejects the Christian commitment to the pursuit of sanctity. In both his Anglican and Roman Catholic writings, Newman attacked the “anti-holiness” principle’s underlying presuppositions, particularly its naturalistic anthropology, its “anthropocentric horizon of discourse,” its rejection of ascetic discipline in religious formation, and its tendency to accept uncritically what is intellectually novel.
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  23.  20
    Girard and the spaces of apocalyptic.Cyril O'regan - 2012 - Modern Theology 28 (1):112-140.
    This article examines the apocalyptic turn evident in René Girard's Battling to the End , which puts an exclamation point on what has been an increasing tendency in Girard's thought. Its general aim is to describe Girard's particular form of biblical apocalyptic. Toward that end, it unfolds Girard's arguments against other apocalyptic contenders, including Hegel and Heidegger; it opens up a space of conversation with other forms of apocalyptic thought ; and in and through Girard's affirmation of Benedict XVI, raises (...)
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  24.  27
    No evidence for neural filling-in – vision as an illusion – pinning down “enaction”.J. K. O'Regan - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):767-768.
    (1) The purported evidence for neural filling-in is not evidence for filling-in, but just for long-range dynamic interactions. (2) Vision is perhaps not an “illusion,” but at any rate it is not “pictorial.” (3) The idea of the “world as an outside memory” as well as MacKay's “conditional readiness for action” may help approach an “enactive” theory of vision.
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  25.  21
    Thoughts on Change Blindness.J. K. O'Regan - unknown
    Recent results showing that large changes in a scene are not noticed if they occur at the same time as a global visual disturbance caused by saccades, flicker, "mudsplashes", or film cuts, are generally explained in terms of a theory in which it is assumed that the observer's internal representation of the outside world is very sparse, containing only what the observer is currently processing. The present paper presents some clarifications of the theory, and some new implications and predictions that (...)
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  26.  3
    6-Month-Old Infants’ Sensitivity to Contingency in a Variant of the Mobile Paradigm With Proximal Stimulation Studied at Fine Temporal Resolution in the Laboratory.Sergiu Tcaci Popescu, Alice Dauphin, Judith Vergne & J. Kevin O’Regan - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Infants’ ability to monitor “sensorimotor contingencies,” i.e., the sensory effects of their own actions, is an important mechanism underlying learning. One method that has been used to investigate this is the “mobile paradigm,” in which a mobile above an infant’s crib is activated by motion of one of the infant’s limbs. Although successfully used in numerous experiments performed in infants’ homes to investigate memory and other types of learning, the paradigm seems less robust for demonstrating sensitivity to sensorimotor contingencies when (...)
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  27.  18
    The Creation of the Anglo-Australian Observatory. S. C. B. Gascoigne, K. M. Proust, M. O. Robins.Norriss S. Hetherington - 1993 - Isis 84 (3):617-618.
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  28.  39
    The Institutes_ of Gaius and Justinian - W. M. Gordon, O. F. Robinson: The Institutes of Gains. Translated with an Introduction; with the Latin Text of Seckel and Kuebler. (Texts in Roman Law.) Pp. 579. London: Duckworth, 1988. Paper, £10.95. - Peter Birks, Grant McLeod: Justinian's Institutes. _Translated with an Introduction; with the Latin Text of Paul Krueger. Pp. 160. London: Duckworth, 1987. Paper, £9.99. [REVIEW]Robin Seager - 1989 - The Classical Review 39 (02):274-276.
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  29.  21
    The Institutes_ of Gaius and Justinian - W. M. Gordon, O. F. Robinson: The Institutes of Gains. Translated with an Introduction; with the Latin Text of Seckel and Kuebler. (Texts in Roman Law.) Pp. 579. London: Duckworth, 1988. Paper, £10.95. - Peter Birks, Grant McLeod: Justinian's Institutes. _Translated with an Introduction; with the Latin Text of Paul Krueger. Pp. 160. London: Duckworth, 1987. Paper, £9.99. [REVIEW]Robin Seager - 1989 - The Classical Review 39 (2):274-276.
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  30.  21
    Andrew Hodges. Alan Turing and the Turing machine. The universal Turing machine, A half-century survey, edited by Rolf Herken, Kammerer & Unverzagt, Hamburg and Berlin, and Oxford University Press, Oxford and New York, 1988. pp. 3–15. - Stephen C. Kleene. Turing's analysis of computahility, and major applications of it. The universal Turing machine, A half-century survey, edited by Rolf Herken, Kammerer & Unverzagt, Hamburg and Berlin, and Oxford University Press, Oxford and New York, 1988. pp. 17–54. - Robin Gandy. The confluence of ideas in 1936. The universal Turing machine, A half-century survey, edited by Rolf Herken, Kammerer & Unverzagt, Hamburg and Berlin, and Oxford University Press, Oxford and New York, 1988. pp. 55–111. - Solomon Feferman. Turing in the land of O. The universal Turing machine, A half-century survey, edited by Rolf Herken, Kammerer & Unverzagt, Hamburg and Berlin, and Oxford University Press, Oxford and New York, 1988. pp. 113–147. - Martin Davis. Mathematica. [REVIEW]John N. Crossley - 1991 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 56 (3):1089-1090.
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  31.  18
    Alan Turing and the Turing Machine.Turing's Analysis of Computability, and Major Applications of it.The Confluence of Ideas in 1936.Turing in the Land of O.Mathematical Logic and the Origin of Modern Computers. [REVIEW]John N. Crossley, Andrew Hodges, Rolf Herken, Stephen C. Kleene, Robin Gandy, Solomon Feferman, Martin Davis & Esther R. Phillips - 1991 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 56 (3):1089.
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  32. Ethics in Early China: An Anthology ed. by Chris Fraser, Dan Robins, and Timothy O'Leary (review).Judson Murray - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (3):442-446.
    Ethics in Early China: An Anthology is a major contribution to the philosophical study of early Chinese ethics and comparative ethics by a collection of some of the most distinguished scholars in these fields. This anthology honors Professor Chad Hansen's many and important contributions to the study of Chinese philosophy, but the work is not a festschrift per se. Instead of discussing the honoree's oeuvre in a collection of essays, these new, innovative, and outstanding writings engage, bear upon, develop, and (...)
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  33. The 'feel'of seeing:: an interview with J. Kevin O'Regan.J. Kevin O'Regan - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (6):278-279.
  34.  8
    What would the robots play? Interview with J. Kevin O’Regan.J. Kevin O’Regan, Włodzisław Duch, Przemysław Nowakowski & Witold Wachowski - 2011 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 2 (2).
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  35.  32
    A Manipulator Can Aid Prediction Market Accuracy.Robin Hanson - unknown
    Prediction markets are low volume speculative markets whose prices offer informative forecasts on particular policy topics. Observers worry that traders may attempt to mislead decision makers by manipulating prices. We adapt a Kyle-style market microstructure model to this case, adding a manipulator with an additional quadratic preference regarding the price. In this model, when other traders are uncertain about the manipulator’s target price, the mean target price has no effect on prices, and increases in the variance of the target price (...)
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  36.  22
    Even Adversarial Agents Should Appear to Agree.Robin Hanson - unknown
    Descriptors: coordination, autonomy, actions, beliefs Abstract Distributing authority among autonomous agents can induce inconsistency costs if the agents act as if they disagree. If we define an agent’s “marginal beliefs” to be the odds at which it is willing to make bets, we find that a betting market can induce agents to act as if they almost agree, not only with respect to the bets they offer but also other actions they take. In a particular “Mars mining” scenario, I explicitly (...)
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  37.  48
    Wittgenstein’s challenge to enactivism.Victor Loughlin - 2019 - Synthese 198 (Suppl 1):391-404.
    Many authors have identified a link between later Wittgenstein and enactivism. But few have also recognised how Wittgenstein may in fact challenge enactivist approaches. In this paper, I consider one such challenge. For example, Wittgenstein is well known for his discussion of seeing-as, most famously through his use of Jastrow’s ambiguous duck-rabbit picture. Seen one way, the picture looks like a duck. Seen another way, the picture looks like a rabbit. Drawing on some of Wittgenstein’s remarks about seeing-as, I show (...)
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  38. A sensorimotor account of vision and visual consciousness.J. Kevin O’Regan & Alva Noë - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):883-917.
    Many current neurophysiological, psychophysical, and psychological approaches to vision rest on the idea that when we see, the brain produces an internal representation of the world. The activation of this internal representation is assumed to give rise to the experience of seeing. The problem with this kind of approach is that it leaves unexplained how the existence of such a detailed internal representation might produce visual consciousness. An alternative proposal is made here. We propose that seeing is a way of (...)
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  39.  1
    Cyril O'Regan, The Heterodox Hegel.Michael E. Zimmerman - 1996 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (2):308-308.
  40.  83
    Why Red Doesn't Sound Like a Bell: Understanding the Feel of Consciousness.J. K. O'Regan - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    The catastrophe of the eye -- A new view of seeing -- Applying the new view of seeing -- The illusion of seeing everything -- Some contentious points -- Towards consciousness -- Types of consciousness -- Phenomenal consciousness, raw feel, and why they're hard -- Squeeze a sponge, drive a porsche : a sensorimotor account of feel -- Consciously experiencing a feel -- The sensorimotor approach to color -- Sensory substitution -- The localization of touch -- The phenomenality plot -- (...)
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  41.  18
    Coincidences in the social-political and cultural conceptions of Carlos Marx and José Martí.Dairy Basulto Barreras, Olga Lidia Barreras López, José Rafael Sánchez Méndez & Robin Ávila Gutiérrez - 2018 - Humanidades Médicas 18 (3):670-683.
    RESUMEN El presente estudio está dirigido a establecer coincidencias entre el pensamiento de José Martí y de Carlos Marx en el terreno filosófico. Ambos representan los más altos exponentes del saber filosófico y humanista de la cultura europea y latinoamericana del siglo XIX, respectivamente, con un alcance genuinamente universal. No fue objetivo en modo alguno convertir a Martí en marxista, del mismo modo que sería absurdo afiliar a Marx a las ideas y las concepciones martianas. Sin embargo, no es posible (...)
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  42.  14
    Chasing Medical Miracles: The Promise and Perils of Clinical Trials.Alex O'Meara - 2009 - Walker & Co..
    Journalist Alex O’Meara is one of the more than twenty million Americans enrolled in a clinical trial—three times as many people as a decade ago. Indeed, clinical trials have become a $24 billion industry that is reshaping every aspect of health-care development and delivery in the United States and around the world. As O’Meara chronicles, twentieth-century medical trials have led to epic advances in health care, from asthma inhalers and insulin pumps to heart valves and pacemakers. And yet, although regulations (...)
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  43. What it is like to see: A sensorimotor theory of perceptual experience.J. Kevin O’Regan - 2001 - Synthese 129 (1):79-103.
    The paper proposes a way of bridging the gapbetween physical processes in the brain and the ''''felt''''aspect of sensory experience. The approach is based onthe idea that experience is not generated by brainprocesses themselves, but rather is constituted by theway these brain processes enable a particular form of''''give-and-take'''' between the perceiver and theenvironment. From this starting-point we are able tocharacterize the phenomenological differences betweenthe different sensory modalities in a more principledway than has been done in the past. We are also (...)
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  44. Solving the "real" mysteries of visual perception: The world as an outside memory.Kevin J. O'Regan - 1992 - Canadian Journal of Psychology 46:461-88.
  45.  84
    Dignity, Character, and Self-Respect.Robin S. Dillon (ed.) - 1994 - Routledge.
    This is the first anthology to bring together a selection of the most important contemporary philosophical essays on the nature and moral significance of self-respect. Representing a diversity of views, the essays illustrate the complexity of self-respect and explore its connections to such topics as personhood, dignity, rights, character, autonomy, integrity, identity, shame, justice, oppression and empowerment. The book demonstrates that self-respect is a formidable concern which goes to the very heart of both moral theory and moral life. Contributors: Bernard (...)
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  46.  28
    Kevin O'Regan, Why Red Doesn't Sound Like a Bell. Understanding the Feel of Consciousness, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011, 224 pp., £22.99, ISBN 978‐0‐19‐977522‐4. [REVIEW]Ophelia Deroy - 2014 - Dialectica 68 (3):473-476.
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  47.  49
    Peirce's reality and Berkeley's blunders.Lesley Friedman - 1997 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (2):253-268.
    Peirce's Reality and Berkeley's Blunders LESLEY FRIEDMAN IN A NUMBER OF HIS LATE REMARKS, Peirce makes it clear that he holds Bishop Berkeley in the highest esteem. Hailed as the "father of all modern philoso- phy," Peirce argues that Berkeley, not Kant, "first produced an Erkenntnis- theorie, or 'principles of human knowledge', which was for the most part cor- rect in its positive assertions" ? This is not at all to say that Berkeley escapes rebuke; in spite of several laudatory (...)
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  48. Respect.Robin S. Dillon - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  49. 'What’s a Woman Worth? What’s Life Worth? Without Self-Respect?’: On the Value of Evaluative Self-Respect.Robin S. Dillon - 2004 - In Margaret Walker and Peggy DesAutels (ed.), Minds, Hearts, and Morality: Feminist Essays in Moral Psychology. Lanham, MD 20706, USA: pp. 47-68.
    In recent years philosophers have done impressive work explicating the nature and moral importance of a kind of self-respect Darwall calls “recognition self-respect,” which involves valuing oneself as the moral equal of every other person, regarding oneself as having basic moral rights and a legitimate claim to respectful treatment from other people just in virtue of being a person, and being unwilling to stand for having one’s rights violated or being treated as something less than a person. It is generally (...)
     
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  50.  30
    Review of Kevin O'Regan, Alva Noe “Does functionalism really deal with the phenomenal side of experience?”. [REVIEW]Allen Lane - unknown
    Sensory Motor Contingencies belong to a functionalistic framework. Functionalism does not give any explanation about why and how objective functional relations should produce phenomenal experience. O’Regan and Noe as well as other functionalists do not propose a new ontology that could support the first person subjective phenomenal side of experience.
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