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Robin C. Jackson [3]Robin Jackson [2]
  1.  36
    Anxiety, anticipation and contextual information: A test of attentional control theory.Adam J. Cocks, Robin C. Jackson, Daniel T. Bishop & A. Mark Williams - 2016 - Cognition and Emotion 30 (6).
  2.  17
    Stepovers and Signal Detection: Response Sensitivity and Bias in the Differentiation of Genuine and Deceptive Football Actions.Robin C. Jackson, Hayley Barton, Kelly J. Ashford & Bruce Abernethy - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  3.  21
    Ritualized behavior in sport.Robin C. Jackson & Rich S. W. Masters - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (6):621-622.
    We consider evidence for ritualized behavior in the sporting domain, noting that such behavior appears commonplace both before a competitive encounter and as part of pre-performance routines. The specific times when ritualized behaviors are displayed support the supposition that they provide temporary relief from pre-competition anxiety and act as thought suppressors in the moments preceding skill execution. (Published Online February 8 2007).
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  4.  51
    Socrates' Iolaos: Myth and Eristic in Plato's Euthydemus.Robin Jackson - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (02):378-.
    The Euthydemus presents a brilliantly comic contrast between Socratic and sophistic argument. Socrates' encounter with the sophistic brothers Euthydemus and Dionysodorus exposes the hollowness of their claim to teach virtue, unmasking it as a predilection for verbal pugilism and the peddling of paradox. The dialogue's humour is pointed, for the brothers' fallacies are often reminiscent of substantial dilemmas explored seriously elsewhere in Plato, and the farce of their manipulation is in sharp contrast to the sobriety with which Socrates pursues his (...)
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    Socrates’ Iolaos: Myth and Eristic in Plato's Euthydemus.Robin Jackson - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (2):378-395.
    TheEuthydemuspresents a brilliantly comic contrast between Socratic and sophistic argument. Socrates' encounter with the sophistic brothers Euthydemus and Dionysodorus exposes the hollowness of their claim to teach virtue, unmasking it as a predilection for verbal pugilism and the peddling of paradox. The dialogue's humour is pointed, for the brothers' fallacies are often reminiscent of substantial dilemmas explored seriously elsewhere in Plato, and the farce of their manipulation is in sharp contrast to the sobriety with which Socrates pursues his own protreptic (...)
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