Results for 'Robert M. Axelrod'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  15
    Theory Medicl Ethics.Robert M. Veatch - 1983 - Basic Books.
    Assesses the ethical problems that doctors face every day and advocates a more universal code of medical ethics, one that draws on the traditions of religion and philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   54 citations  
  2.  28
    The Divine Simplicity in St Thomas: ROBERT M. BURNS.Robert M. Burns - 1989 - Religious Studies 25 (3):271-293.
    In the Summa Theologiae ‘simplicity’ is treated as pre–eminent among the terms which may properly be used to describe the divine nature. The Question in which Thomas demonstrates that God must be ‘totally and in every way simple’ immediately follows the five proofs of God's existence, preceding the treatment of His other perfections, and being frequently used as the basis for proving them. Then in Question 13 ‘univocal predication' is held to be ‘impossible between God and creatures’ so that at (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3.  50
    The impending collapse of the whole-brain definition of death.Robert M. Veatch - 2009 - In John P. Lizza (ed.), Defining the Beginning and End of Life: Readings on Personal Identity and Bioethics. Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 18-24.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   58 citations  
  4.  7
    The Basics of Bioethics.Robert M. Veatch - 2012 - Routledge.
  5. Folk psychology as simulation.Robert M. Gordon - 1986 - Mind and Language 1 (2):158-71.
  6.  45
    Reconciling Lists of Principles in Bioethics.Robert M. Veatch - 2020 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 45 (4-5):540-559.
    In celebration of the fortieth anniversary of the publication of Beauchamp and Childress’s Principles of Biomedical Ethics, a review is undertaken to compare the lists of principles in various bioethical theories to determine the extent to which the various lists can be reconciled. Included are the single principle theories of utilitarianism, libertarianism, Hippocratism, and the theories of Pellegrino, Engelhardt, The Belmont Report, Beauchamp and Childress, Ross, Veatch, and Gert. We find theories all offering lists of principles numbering from one to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  7.  19
    The Impending Collapse of the Whole-Brain Definition of Death.Robert M. Veatch - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (4):18.
    No one really believes that literally all functions of the entire brain must be lost for an individual to be dead. A better definition of death involves a higher brain orientation.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   59 citations  
  8.  72
    Abandoning Informed Consent.Robert M. Veatch - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (2):5-12.
    Clinicians cannot obtain valid consent to treatment because they cannot guess which treatment option will serve a particular patient's best interests. These guesses could be made more accurately if patients were paired with providers who share their deep values.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   55 citations  
  9.  7
    Saussure, Derrida, and the metaphysics of subjectivity.Robert M. Strozier - 1988 - New York: Mouton de Gruyter.
  10.  8
    Genetical population structure and song dialects in birds.Robert M. Zink - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):118-119.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  29
    Controversies in defining death: a case for choice.Robert M. Veatch - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (5):381-401.
    When a new, brain-based definition of death was proposed fifty years ago, no one realized that the issue would remain unresolved for so long. Recently, six new controversies have added to the debate: whether there is a right to refuse apnea testing, which set of criteria should be chosen to measure the death of the brain, how the problem of erroneous testing should be handled, whether any of the current criteria sets accurately measures the death of the brain, whether standard (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  12.  26
    Models for Ethical Medicine in a Revolutionary Age.Robert M. Veatch - 1972 - Hastings Center Report 2 (3):5-7.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  13.  53
    The impossibility of a morality internal to medicine.Robert M. Veatch - 2001 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (6):621 – 642.
    After distinguishing two different meanings of the notion of a morality internal to medicine and considering a hypothetical case of a society that relied on its surgeons to eunuchize priest/cantors to permit them to play an important religious/cultural role, this paper examines three reasons why morality cannot be derived from reflection on the ends of the practice of medicine: (1) there exist many medical roles and these have different ends or purposes, (2) even within any given medical role, there exists (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  14.  30
    Is there A Place for Historical Criticism?: ROBERT M. PRICE.Robert M. Price - 1991 - Religious Studies 27 (3):371-388.
    Modern historical criticism of the gospels and Christian origins began in the seventeenth century largely as an attempt to debunk the Christian religion as a pious fraud. The gospels were seen as bits of priestcraft and humbug of a piece with the apocryphal Donation of Constantine. In the few centuries since Reimarus and his critical kin, historical criticism has been embraced and assimilated by many Christian scholars who have seen in it the logical extension of the grammatico-historical method of the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. The death of whole-brain death: The plague of the disaggregators, somaticists, and mentalists.Robert M. Veatch - 2005 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (4):353 – 378.
    In its October 2001 issue, this journal published a series of articles questioning the Whole-Brain-based definition of death. Much of the concern focused on whether somatic integration - a commonly understood basis for the whole-brain death view - can survive the brain's death. The present article accepts that there are insurmountable problems with whole-brain death views, but challenges the assumption that loss of somatic integration is the proper basis for pronouncing death. It examines three major themes. First, it accepts the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  16.  17
    Killing by Organ Procurement: Brain-Based Death and Legal Fictions.Robert M. Veatch - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (3):289-311.
    The dead donor rule (DDR) governs procuring life-prolonging organs. They should be taken only from deceased donors. Miller and Truog have proposed abandoning the rule when patients have decided to forgo life-sustaining treatment and have consented to procurement. Organs could then be procured from living patients, thus killing them by organ procurement. This proposal warrants careful examination. They convincingly argue that current brain or circulatory death pronouncement misidentifies the biologically dead. After arguing convincingly that physicians already cause death by withdrawing (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  17.  64
    Doctor does not know best: Why in the new century physicians must stop trying to benefit patients.Robert M. Veatch - 2000 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (6):701 – 721.
    While twentieth-century medical ethics has focused on the duty of physicians to benefit their patients, the next century will see that duty challenged in three ways. First, we will increasingly recognize that it is unrealistic to expect physicians to be able to determine what will benefit their patients. Either they limit their attention to medical well-being when total well-being is the proper end of the patient or they strive for total well-being, which takes them beyond their expertise. Even within the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  18.  43
    Hippocratic, religious, and secular ethics: The points of conflict.Robert M. Veatch - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (1):33-43.
    The origins of professional ethical codes and oaths are explored. Their legitimacy and usefulness within the profession are questioned and an alternative ethical source is suggested. This source relies on a commonly shared, naturally knowable set of principles known as common morality.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  19. The simulation theory: Objections and misconceptions.Robert M. Gordon - 1992 - Mind and Language 7 (1-2):11-34.
  20.  9
    Death, Dying, and the Biological Revolution: Our Last Quest for Responsibility.Robert M. Veatch - 1976 - Yale University Press.
  21.  36
    Transplanting Hearts after Death Measured by Cardiac Criteria: The Challenge to the Dead Donor Rule.Robert M. Veatch - 2010 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (3):313-329.
    The current definition of death used for donation after cardiac death relies on a determination of the irreversible cessation of the cardiac function. Although this criterion can be compatible with transplantation of most organs, it is not compatible with heart transplantation since heart transplants by definition involve the resuscitation of the supposedly "irreversibly" stopped heart. Subsequently, the definition of "irreversible" has been altered so as to permit heart transplantation in some circumstances, but this is unsatisfactory. There are three available strategies (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  22.  12
    Patient, heal thyself: how the new medicine puts the patient in charge.Robert M. Veatch - 2009 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    The puzzling case of the broken arm -- Hernias, diets, and drugs -- Why physicians cannot know what will benefit patients -- Sacrificing patient benefit to protect patient rights -- Societal interests and duties to others -- The new, limited, twenty-first-century role for physicians as patient assistants -- Abandoning modern medical concepts: doctor's "orders" and hospital "discharge" -- Medicine can't "indicate": so why do we talk that way? --"Treatments of choice" and "medical necessity": who is fooling whom? -- Abandoning informed (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  23. Mind, Brain and Adaptation in the Nineteenth Century.Robert M. Young & Nils Roll-Hansen - 1994 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16 (2):355.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   146 citations  
  24. Abandon the dead donor rule or change the definition of death?Robert M. Veatch - 2004 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (3):261-276.
    : Research by Siminoff and colleagues reveals that many lay people in Ohio classify legally living persons in irreversible coma or persistent vegetative state (PVS) as dead and that additional respondents, although classifying such patients as living, would be willing to procure organs from them. This paper analyzes possible implications of these findings for public policy. A majority would procure organs from those in irreversible coma or in PVS. Two strategies for legitimizing such procurement are suggested. One strategy would be (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  25.  45
    Case studies in medical ethics.Robert M. Veatch - 1977 - Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
    INTRODUCTION Five Questions of Ethics Medical ethics as a field presents a fundamental problem. As a branch of applied ethics, medical ethics becomes ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  26.  21
    Rule-plus-exception model of classification learning.Robert M. Nosofsky, Thomas J. Palmeri & Stephen C. McKinley - 1994 - Psychological Review 101 (1):53-79.
  27.  3
    Disrupted dialogue: medical ethics and the collapse of physician-humanist communication (1770-1980).Robert M. Veatch - 2005 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Medical ethics changed dramatically in the past 30 years because physicians and humanists actively engaged each other in discussions that sometimes led to confrontation and controversy, but usually have improved the quality of medical decision-making. Before then medical ethics had been isolated for almost two centuries from the larger philosophical, social, and religious controversies of the time. There was, however, an earlier period where leaders in medicine and in the humanities worked closely together and both fields were richer for it. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  28.  31
    Indifference of subjects: An alternative to equipoise in randomized clinical trials.Robert M. Veatch - 2002 - Social Philosophy and Policy 19 (2):295-323.
    The physician who upholds the Hippocratic oath is supposed to be loyal to his or her patients. This requires choosing only the therapy that the physician believes is best for the patient. However, knowing what is best requires randomized clinical trials. Thus, clinicians must be willing to recruit their patients to be assigned at random to one of two therapies in order to determine which is best based on the highest standards of pharmacological science.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  29.  49
    The place of care in ethical theory.Robert M. Veatch - 1998 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (2):210 – 224.
    The concept of care and a related ethical theory of care have emerged as increasingly important in biomedical ethics. This essay outlines a series of questions about the conceptualization of care and its place in ethical theory. First, it considers the possibility that care should be conceptualized as an alternative principle of right action; then as a virtue, a cluster of virtues, or as a synonym for virtue theory. The implications for various interpretations of the debate of the relation of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  30.  66
    The irrelevance of equipoise.Robert M. Veatch - 2007 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (2):167 – 183.
    It is commonly believed in research ethics that some form of equipoise is a necessary condition for justifying randomized clinical trials, that without it clinicians are violating the moral duty to do what is best for the patient. Recent criticisms have shown how complex the concept of equipoise is, but often retain the commitment to some form of equipoise for randomization to be justified. This article rejects that claim. It first asks for what one should be equally poised (scientific or (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  31. Simulation without introspection or inference from me to you.Robert M. Gordon - 1995 - In Martin Davies & Tony Stone (eds.), Mental Simulation. Blackwell.
  32.  27
    Resolving Conflicts Among Principles: Ranking, Balancing, and Specifying.Robert M. Veatch - 1995 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 5 (3):199-218.
    While much attention has been given to the use of principles in biomedical ethics and increasing attention is given to alternative theoretical approaches, relatively little attention has been devoted to the critical task of how one resolves conflicts among competing principles. After summarizing the system of principles and some problems in conceptualizing the principles, several strategies for reconciling conflicts among principles are examined including the use of single-principle theories (pure libertarianism, pure utilitarianism, and pure Hippocratism), balancing theories, conflicting appeals theories, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  33. Why Liberals Should Accept Financial Incentives for Organ Procurement.Robert M. Veatch - 2003 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (1):19-36.
    : Free-market libertarians have long supported incentives to increase organ procurement, but those oriented to justice traditionally have opposed them. This paper presents the reasons why those worried about justice should reconsider financial incentives and tolerate them as a lesser moral evil. After considering concerns about discrimination and coercion and setting them aside, it is suggested that the real moral concern should be manipulation of the neediest. The one offering the incentive (the government) has the resources to eliminate the basic (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  34.  28
    The dead donor rule: True by definition.Robert M. Veatch - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (1):10 – 11.
  35.  36
    The Structure of Emotions.Robert M. Gordon & Ronald De Sousa - 1989 - Journal of Philosophy 86 (9):493-504.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   120 citations  
  36.  28
    Implied, presumed and waived consent: The relative moral wrongs of under- and over-informing.Robert M. Veatch - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (12):39 – 41.
  37.  39
    Is There a Common Morality?Robert M. Veatch - 2003 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (3):189-192.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13.3 (2003) 189-192 [Access article in PDF] Is There a Common Morality? Robert M. VeatchSenior EditorOne of the most exciting and important developments in recent ethical theory—especially bioethical theory—is the emergence of the concept of "common morality." Some of the most influential theories in bioethics have endorsed the notion using it as the starting point of their systems. This issue of the Journal (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  38. Justice, the basic social contract and health care.Robert M. Veatch - forthcoming - Contemporary Issues in Bioethics.
  39. Motive Utilitarianism.Robert M. Adams - 1976 - In James Rachels (ed.), Ethical Theory 2: Theories About How We Should Live. Oxford University Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  40.  10
    An exemplar-based random walk model of speeded classification.Robert M. Nosofsky & Thomas J. Palmeri - 1997 - Psychological Review 104 (2):266-300.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   75 citations  
  41.  6
    The Simulation Theory: Objections and Misconceptions.Robert M. Gordon - 1992 - Mind and Language 7 (1-2):11-34.
  42.  38
    Strong axioms of infinity and elementary embeddings.Robert M. Solovay - 1978 - Annals of Mathematical Logic 13 (1):73.
  43.  6
    Medical Ethics.Robert M. Veatch - 1989 - Jones & Bartlett Publishers.
    Twelve contributors discuss critical issues affecting medical ethics. Topics include: the normative principles of medical ethics, concepts of health and disease, the physician-patient relationship, human experimentation, informed consent, genetics, ethical issues in organ transplantation, and moral.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  44. Subcognition and the limits of the Turing test.Robert M. French - 1990 - Mind 99 (393):53-66.
  45.  18
    Darwin's Metaphor Does Nature Select ?Robert M. Young - 1971 - Dept. Of Philosophy, San Jose College.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  46.  15
    Would a Reasonable Person Now Accept the 1968 Harvard Brain Death Report? A Short History of Brain Death.Robert M. Veatch - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S4):6-9.
    When The Ad Hoc Committee of Harvard Medical School to Examine the Definition of Brain Death began meeting in 1967, I was a graduate student, with committee member Ralph Potter and committee chair Henry Beecher as my mentors. The question of when to stop life support on a severely compromised patient was not clearly differentiated from the question of when someone was dead. A serious clinical problem arose when physicians realized that a patient's condition was hopeless but life support perpetuated (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  47.  47
    Reply to Stich and Nichols.Robert M. Gordon - 1992 - Mind and Language 7 (1-2):87-97.
  48. Sympathy, simulation, and the impartial spectator.Robert M. Gordon - 1996 - In L. May, Michael Friedman & A. Clark (eds.), Ethics. MIT Press. pp. 727-742.
  49.  58
    The Concept of Voluntary Consent.Robert M. Nelson, Tom Beauchamp, Victoria A. Miller, William Reynolds, Richard F. Ittenbach & Mary Frances Luce - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (8):6-16.
    Our primary focus is on analysis of the concept of voluntariness, with a secondary focus on the implications of our analysis for the concept and the requirements of voluntary informed consent. We propose that two necessary and jointly sufficient conditions must be satisfied for an action to be voluntary: intentionality, and substantial freedom from controlling influences. We reject authenticity as a necessary condition of voluntary action, and we note that constraining situations may or may not undermine voluntariness, depending on the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  50. The Rationality of Emotion.Robert M. Gordon - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (2):284.
    How should we understand the emotional rationality? This first part will explore two models of cognition and analogy strategies, test their intuition about the emotional desire. I distinguish between subjective and objective desire, then presents with a feeling from the "paradigm of drama" export semantics, here our emotional repertoire is acquired all the learned, and our emotions in the form of an object is fixed. It is pretty well in line with the general principles of rationality, especially the lowest reasonable (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   67 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000