30 found
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Robert Chapman [29]Robert L. Chapman [11]Robert M. Chapman [3]Robert Lawrence Chapman [2]
See also
Robert Chapman
Pace University
Robert Chapman-Ames
University of Westminster
Robert James Chapman
University of Southampton
  1. Representing the Autism Spectrum.Robert Chapman & Walter Veit - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (4):46-48.
    Volume 20, Issue 4, May 2020, Page 46-48.
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  2. Evidential Reasoning in Archaeology.Robert Chapman & Alison Wylie - 2016 - London: Bloomsbury Academic Publishing.
    Material traces of the past are notoriously inscrutable; they rarely speak with one voice, and what they say is never unmediated. They stand as evidence only given a rich scaffolding of interpretation which is, itself, always open to challenge and revision. And yet archaeological evidence has dramatically expanded what we know of the cultural past, sometimes demonstrating a striking capacity to disrupt settled assumptions. The questions we address in Evidential Reasoning are: How are these successes realized? What gives us confidence (...)
  3. Neurodiversity, epistemic injustice, and the good human life.Robert Chapman & Havi Carel - 2022 - Journal of Social Philosophy 53 (4):614-631.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  4.  87
    Autism as a Form of Life: Wittgenstein and the Psychological Coherence of Autism.Robert Chapman - 2019 - Metaphilosophy 50 (4):421-440.
    Autism is often taken to be a specific kind of mind. The dominant neuro‐cognitivist approach explains this via static processing traits framed in terms of hyper‐systemising and hypo‐empathising. By contrast, Wittgenstein‐inspired commentators argue that the coherence of autism arises relationally, from intersubjective disruption that hinders access to a shared world of linguistic meaning. This paper argues that both camps are unduly reductionistic and conflict with emerging evidence, due in part to unjustifiably assuming a deficit‐based framing of autism. It then develops (...)
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  5. The reality of autism: On the metaphysics of disorder and diversity.Robert Chapman - 2020 - Philosophical Psychology 33 (6):799-819.
    Typically, although it’s notoriously hard to define, autism has been represented as a biologically-based mental disorder that can be usefully investigated by biomedical science. In recent years, ho...
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  6. Neurodiversity theory and its discontents.Robert Chapman - 2019 - In Şerife Tekin & Robyn Bluhm (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Philosophy of Psychiatry. London: Bloomsbury.
  7. Material Evidence.Alison Wylie & Robert Chapman (eds.) - 2014 - New York / London: Routledge.
    How do archaeologists make effective use of physical traces and material culture as repositories of evidence? Material Evidence is a collection of 19 essays that take a resolutely case-based approach to this question, exploring key instances of exemplary practice, instructive failures, and innovative developments in the use of archaeological data as evidence. The goal is to bring to the surface the wisdom of practice, teasing out norms of archaeological reasoning from evidence. -/- Archaeologists make compelling use of an enormously diverse (...)
  8.  76
    A Critique of Critical Psychiatry.Robert Chapman - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (2):103-119.
    The contemporary form of critical psychiatry and psychology focused on here follows Thomas Szasz in arguing that many of the concepts and practices of psychiatry are unscientific, value-laden, and epistemically violent. These claims are based on what I call the ‘comparativist’ critique, referred to as such since the argument relies on comparing psychiatry to what is taken to be a comparatively objective and useful somatic medicine. Here I adopt a Sedgwickian constructivist approach to illness and disability more generally to argue (...)
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  9.  35
    How to think about environmental studies.Robert L. Chapman - 2007 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (1):59–74.
    It is not possible to date when environmental studies became ‘Environmental Studies’. Nevertheless it has had a turbulent history marked by inconsistency, conflict and change. It is not surprising that at present it lacks disciplinary coherence and is subject to various definitions, often contradictory. There is ongoing speculation as to the cause of this identity crisis: ‘curricular universalism’ (absence of a unifying concept), academic territorialism and pedagogical clashes. I argue that a philosophical inquiry into the role of values in Environmental (...)
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  10.  24
    Immigration and Environment: Settling the Moral Boundaries.Robert L. Chapman - 2000 - Environmental Values 9 (2):189-209.
    Large populations fuelled by immigration have damaging effects on natural environments. Utilitarian approaches to immigration are inadequate, since they fail to draw the appropriate boundaries between people, as are standard rights approaches buttressed by sovereignty concerns because they fail to include critical environmental concerns within their pantheon of rights. A right to a healthy environment is a basic/subsistence right to be enjoyed by everyone, resident and immigrant alike. Current political-economic arrangements reinforced by familiar ethical positions that support property rights and (...)
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  11.  17
    Critical Psychiatry, Mental Health, and Collective Liberation.Robert Chapman - 2023 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 30 (2):129-131.
    In each of their respective commentaries Dr. Steingard (2023) and Dr. Jones (2023) largely agree with the core argument I outline in ‘A Critique of Critical Psychiatry.’ In that critique, I sought to show how and why Szaszian critical psychiatry or psychology will always be incompatible with collective liberation. I am heartened by their agreement, not least because both Steingard and Jones have been prominent critics of psychiatry themselves. I am also grateful that they each raise important questions that draw (...)
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  12. “It’s the Economy, Stupid!” and the Environment.Robert L. Chapman - 2015 - Environmental Ethics 37 (4):465-484.
    The current economic/political system, neoliberalism, has touched every aspect of life globally. The doctrine of neoliberalism consists of three central propositions, that the market is real and part of the natural universal law; that unlimited economic growth is both possible and even desirable; and that human nature is coincident with market values and based solely on self-interest. All three of these propositions are seriously flawed and have caused immense human suffering and staggering environmental destruction. This paper is a reminder of (...)
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  13. Material evidence: learning from archaeological practice.Alison Wylie & Robert Chapman - 2014 - In Alison Wylie & Robert Chapman (eds.), Material Evidence. New York / London: Routledge.
  14.  21
    Report on Books and Articles.Elisa Aaltola, Gary Backhaus, John Murungi, Jennifer Bates, Emily Brady, Emily Brady Haapala, J. Baird Callicott & Robert L. Chapman - 2003 - Environmental Ethics 24 (2):75-91.
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  15.  13
    Archaeological theory: the basics.Robert Chapman - 2023 - New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
    Archaeological Theory: The Basics is an accessible introduction to an indispensable part of what archaeologists do. The book guides the reader to an understanding of what theory is, how it works, and the range of theories used in archaeology. The growth of theory and the adoption of theories drawn from both the natural and social sciences have broadened our ability to produce trustworthy knowledge about the past. This book helps readers to see the value of archaeological theory and beyond what (...)
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  16.  40
    Crowded Solitude.Robert Chapman - 2004 - Environmental Philosophy 1 (1):58-72.
    Wilderness and wildness are not related isomorphically. Wildness is the broader category; all instances of wilderness express wildness while all instances of wildness do not express wilderness. There is more than a logical distinction between wildness and wilderness, and what begins as an analytic distinction ends as an ontological one. A more rhetorical representation of this confusion is captured by the notion of synecdoche, where, in this case, wilderness the narrower term is used for wildness the more expansive term. Although (...)
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  17.  4
    Crowded Solitude.Robert Chapman - 2004 - Environmental Philosophy 1 (1):58-72.
    Wilderness and wildness are not related isomorphically. Wildness is the broader category; all instances of wilderness express wildness while all instances of wildness do not express wilderness. There is more than a logical distinction between wildness and wilderness, and what begins as an analytic distinction ends as an ontological one. A more rhetorical representation of this confusion is captured by the notion of synecdoche, where, in this case, wilderness the narrower term is used for wildness the more expansive term. Although (...)
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  18.  13
    Dual thrust in interpreting P3 and memory.Robert M. Chapman - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (3):377.
  19.  64
    Function and content words evoke different brain potentials.Robert M. Chapman - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):282-284.
    Word class-specific differences in brain evoked potentials (EP) are discussed for connotative meaning and for function versus content words. A well-controlled experiment found matching lexical decision times for function and content words, but clear EP differences (component with maximum near 550 msec) among function words, content words, and nonwords that depended on brain site. Another EP component, with a 480 msec maximum, differentiated words (either function or content) from nonwords.
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  20. Other archaeologies and disciplines: mortuary analysis in the twenty-first century.Robert Chapman - 2003 - In Robert J. Jeske & Douglas K. Charles (eds.), Theory, Method, and Practice in Modern Archaeology. Praeger.
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  21.  16
    Reconnecting Lives to the Land: An Agenda for Critical Dialogue.Robert L. Chapman - 2011 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (2):239 - 242.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 14, Issue 2, Page 239-242, June 2011.
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  22.  17
    The effects of crowding during pregnancy on offspring emotional and sexual behavior in rats.Robert Chapman, Frank Masterpasqua & Richard Lore - 1976 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 7 (5):475-477.
  23.  24
    The Goat-stag and the Sphinx: The Place of the Virtues in Environmental Ethics.Robert L. Chapman - 2002 - Environmental Values 11 (2):129-144.
    Standard virtue ethics approach to environmental issues do not go far enough because they often lack significant attachment to local environments. Place provides the necessary link that enlarges the arena of moral action by joining human well-being to a place -based goal of wildness or biotic harmony. Place defines a niche for human activity as part of nature. Virtuous action, then, is understood as deliberation from a position of being in and of the natural world; respect and gratitude are examples (...)
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  24. Urbanism in Copper and Bronze Age Iberia?Robert Chapman - 1995 - In Chapman Robert (ed.), Social Complexity and the Development of Towns in Iberia, From the Copper Age to the Second Century AD. pp. 29-46.
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  25.  23
    William R. Jordon III and George M. Lubick. Making Nature Whole: A History of Ecological Restoration.Robert L. Chapman - 2013 - Environmental Ethics 35 (3):367-370.
  26.  33
    Changes in two EEG rhythms during mental activity.Murray Glanzer, Robert M. Chapman, William H. Clark & Henry R. Bragdon - 1964 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 68 (3):273.
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  27.  2
    Book Review: No Man's Garden: Thoreau and a New Vision of Civilization and Nature. [REVIEW]Robert L. Chapman - 2001 - Environmental Values 10 (4):546-548.
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  28.  8
    Character and Environment. [REVIEW]Robert Chapman - 2008 - Environmental Philosophy 5 (2):180-184.
  29.  49
    Character and Environment. [REVIEW]Robert Chapman - 2008 - Environmental Philosophy 5 (2):180-184.
  30.  22
    Environmental Ethics, Ecological Theology, and Natural Selection. [REVIEW]Robert L. Chapman - 2005 - Environmental Philosophy 2 (2):74-76.