8 found
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  1. Japan's Dilemma with the Definition of Death.Rihito Kimura - 1991 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 1 (2):123-131.
  2.  59
    Anencephalic organ donation: A japanese case.Rihito Kimura - 1989 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 14 (1):97-102.
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  3. History of medical ethics: contemporary Japan.Rihito Kimura - forthcoming - Encyclopedia of Bioethics.
     
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  4.  1
    Inochi No Baioeshikkusu: Kankyō, Kodomo, Seishi No Ketsudan.Rihito Kimura, Naoko Kakee & Naoto Kawahara (eds.) - 2008 - Koronasha.
    科学技術の発展とともに、バイオエシックスはいつも新しい課題に直面し、挑戦し続けている。このバイオエシックスの軌跡を「環境・自然」、「こどもの医療」、「生死の決断」等、私たちのいのちに関わる重要なテーマ に焦点をあてて検討、考察し、問題解決への提言を行った。.
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  5.  58
    Death and dying in japan.Rihito Kimura - 1996 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 6 (4):374-378.
  6.  30
    Ethics committees for "high tech" innovations in japan.Rihito Kimura - 1989 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 14 (4):457-464.
    Although ethics committees in Japan have been developing in major medical schools and in some hospitals, their members are usually medical professionals from the same institution. The lack of national legislation for setting up ethics committees permits only a voluntary code of standards for doing clinical research work in high tech medical applications. The author argues for the necessity of more open debate on bioethical issues and proposes the participation of the lay public and bioethicists in Ethics Committees in Japan. (...)
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  7.  33
    Bioethics as a prescription for civic action: The japanese interpretation.Rihito Kimura - 1987 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 12 (3):267-277.
    This paper reports on recent developments in the rise of bioethics in Japan. Much of the recent interest in bioethics in Japan is seen as a response to various civic movements. The women's liberation movement, access to equal opportunity, and the recognition of patients' rights and the importance of informed consent are among some of the movements influencing the development of bioethics in Japan. The author argues that this movement is to be encouraged and fostered by health care professionals, public (...)
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  8.  4
    In Japan, Parents Participate but Doctors Decide.Rihito Kimura - 1986 - Hastings Center Report 16 (4):22-23.
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