7 found
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  1.  17
    A Discussion of Kretchmar’s Elements of Competition.Richard Royce - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (2):178-191.
    Recently Kretchmar attempted to apply and to explore Husserl’s transcendental phenomenological method in relation to clarifying, in the context of sport particularly, the main features of competition. He concludes with the strong claim that competition is unintelligible unless understood in relation to the four elements of plurality, comparison, normativity, and disputation. Roughly, the idea is that competition needs to be understood as a context in which more than one competitor is involved; where competitors are compared; that comparisons are evaluations of (...)
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  2.  37
    Concerning a Moral Duty to Cheat in Games.Richard Royce - 2012 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 6 (3):323-335.
    Stimulated by Hugh Upton's recent article in this journal, in which he argues that there can be a moral duty to cheat in games, I attempt to examine his claims. Much of what he writes revolves around examples from two sports, cricket and rugby, and with differing connections to those games' rules. While the example from cricket is said to involve a breach of the spirit of that game, it is contravention of the written rules of rugby on which the (...)
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  3.  11
    Skultety's Categories of Competition – A Competing Conceptualisation?Richard Royce - 2013 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7 (2):217-230.
    A recent article in this journal attempts to link categories of sport competition to appropriate psychologies of participants in the different sorts of competition. It criticises accounts of competition which understand it in relation to a very restricted range of psychologies because the purposes and psychologies with which people enter and engage in competition vary enormously. So, taking as a starting point a consensus view among sport philosophers of the key conditions governing competition, work is undertaken to identify fundamental distinctions (...)
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  4.  18
    Game-Players and Game-Playing: A Response to Kreider.Richard Royce - 2013 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 40 (2):225 - 239.
    This article is an examination of the recent contribution in this journal by Kreider. In that publication he argued against formalist and non-formalist positions concerning our understanding of game-player and game-playing, focusing his discussion around game rules and their relationship to the two key concepts. This led him to produce alternative conceptions of game-player and game-playing, and it is these conceptions tied closely to the idea of commitment, and Kreider?s arguments surrounding them, which are the subject of my article. Following (...)
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  5.  39
    Suits, Autotelicity, Temporal Reallocations, Game Resources and Defining 'Play'.Richard Royce - 2011 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 5 (2):93 - 109.
    Bernard Suits bequeathed a rich legacy of philosophical insights contributing to our developing a deeper understanding of sport-related issues, and his work has attracted much attention and stimulated valuable controversy over many years. However, the interest it has stimulated appears uneven. In this context and with reference to the former claims above, I focus on a part of his work that has received relatively less commentary, in the hope that it too will yield work of value. Given the imaginative quality (...)
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  6.  20
    Refereeing and Technology–Reflections on Collins' Proposals.Richard Royce - 2012 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 39 (1):53-64.
    The advent of communications technology has enabled large and world-wide audiences to have visual access to sports whose spatially limited field of action prevents such numbers of interested spectators attending the event in person to witness them. Simultaneously a number of new issues for sport have arisen. Recognising that spectators? location and distance from sporting events at times permit audiences viewing at home to enjoy a better view of the action, organisers sometimes erect huge screens relaying the action at sporting (...)
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  7.  11
    Viewing Televised Sporting Events: A Response to Fisher.Richard Royce - 2007 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 34 (1):77-87.