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  1.  41
    Sinking “Like a Corpse” or Living the “Soul’s Full Desire”: Shaker Women in Fiction and History.Richard M. Marshall - 2010 - Utopian Studies 21 (1):57-90.
    This article examines the disparity between fictional and historical accounts of Shaker women. Th e fiction, influenced by pervading social beliefs like the cult of true womanhood, usually portrays a woman who becomes dissatisfied with her Shaker life, concluding that it is a sort of living death that isolates her from love, marriage, and motherhood. Historical records reveal independent and fulfilled women who became Shakers for religious reasons but also for secular opportunities unknown in the outside world, including companionship, refuge (...)
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  2.  27
    New York Amish: Life in the Plain Communities of the Empire State by Karen M. Johnson-Weiner.Richard M. Marshall - 2017 - Utopian Studies 28 (1):198-202.
    Quilts with "a black-and-white checked" pattern "for the NASCAR market" are stitched together by an Amish woman whose family uses an outdoor privy because church rules stipulate "no indoor plumbing"; an Amish man delivers cans of his milk to an Amish-owned neighborhood collection tank cooled by electricity because state laws require the refrigeration of milk. These are just a few of the images Karen Johnson-Weiner presents of the New York State Amish and their continuing effort to maintain a life disconnected (...)
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  3.  25
    Mennonite Women in Canada: A History (Review).Richard M. Marshall - 2010 - Utopian Studies 21 (2):343-348.
  4.  14
    Visiting the Shakers: 1850–1899 Ed. By Glendyne Wergland.Richard M. Marshall - 2017 - Utopian Studies 28 (3):673-685.
    During the second half of the nineteenth century, visitors to Shaker villages were numerous and various, quite various. In 1865, a New York Times reporter offered these observations: "Not a smile illumines the hard, wrinkled features of male or female Shaker. The youngsters … must enjoy the gymnastics [the Shakers' dancing], but their enjoyment has little opportunity for display. Solemn old heads frown down the slightest demonstration of nature,, and so the boys' faces are almost as expressionless as their own". (...)
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