18 found
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  1.  63
    Delusions, Certainty, and the Background.John Rhodes & Richard G. T. Gipps - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (4):295-310.
    Cognitive psychologists have recently identified alterations in perception and reasoning that contribute to the formation and maintenance of beliefs that happen to be delusional. Clinically significant delusions, however, are often deeply unusual. An account of their formation and maintenance must explain not merely how someone can come to hold false or uncommon beliefs, but also how someone can arrive at beliefs that seem profoundly improbable and even bizarre. This paper uses the philosophical concepts of the Bedrock and the Background to (...)
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  2. The Oxford handbook of philosophy and psychiatry.K. W. M. Fulford, Martin Davies, Richard G. T. Gipps, George Graham, John Z. Sadler, Giovanni Stanghellini & Tim Thornton (eds.) - 2013 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Philosophy has much to offer psychiatry, not least regarding ethical issues, but also issues regarding the mind, identity, values, and volition. This has become only more important as we have witnessed the growth and power of the pharmaceutical industry, accompanied by developments in the neurosciences. However, too few practising psychiatrists are familiar with the literature in this area. -/- The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry offers the most comprehensive reference resource for this area ever published. It assembles challenging and (...)
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  3.  45
    Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychoanalysis.Richard G. T. Gipps & Michael Lacewing (eds.) - 2019 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Psychoanalysis is often equated with Sigmund Freud, but this comparison ignores the wide range of clinical practices, observational methods, general theories, and cross-pollinations with other disciplines that characterise contemporary psychoanalytic work. Central psychoanalytic concepts to do with unconscious motivation, primitive forms of thought, defence mechanisms, and transference form a mainstay of today's richly textured contemporary clinical psychological practice. -/- In this landmark collection on philosophy and psychoanalysis, leading researchers provide an evaluative overview of current thinking. Written at the interface between (...)
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  4. Autism and Intersubjectivity: Beyond Cognitivism and the Theory of Mind.Richard G. T. Gipps - 2004 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (3):195-198.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Autism and Intersubjectivity:Beyond Cognitivism and the Theory of MindRichard Gipps (bio)The papers that make up this special issue of Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology are obviously united by both topic and approach. They all look at autism through a philosophical lens—both at infantile autism (Gallagher 2004a, 2004b; McGeer 2004; Shanker 2004) and at schizophrenic autism (Stanghellini and Ballerini 2004). Moreover, they are all concerned with the foundations of our understanding (...)
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  5.  17
    Psychotherapy as Ethics.Richard G. T. Gipps - 2023 - Philosophies 8 (2):42.
    Talk of matters ethical is, in the psychotherapeutic context, typically relegated to therapy’s preconditions and setting, i.e., to its ‘frame’. What goes on within that frame, i.e., therapeutic action itself, gets theorised in psychological rather than ethical terms. An explanation for this is the frequent therapeutic imperative to extirpate self-directed moralising. Moralising, however, constitutes but a phoney pretender to the ethical life. A true ethical sensibility instead shows itself in such moments of life as involve our offering humane recognition to (...)
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  6.  5
    Madness, Reason, and Pride.Richard G. T. Gipps - 2023 - Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology 30 (4):307-311.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Madness, Reason, and PrideRichard G.T. Gipps, PhD (bio)MadnessQuestions such as “what’s madness?” or “what’s reason?” carry no singular sense about with them wherever they go—which isn’t to say that, asked out of a particular interest in a particular context, they can’t be perfectly intelligible. Garson (2023) is wise to this when he follows “what is madness?” with “as opposed to what?”, even if this latter question itself hardly enjoys (...)
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  7. Illnesses and Likenesses.Richard G. T. Gipps - 2003 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (3):255-259.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology 10.3 (2003) 255-259 [Access article in PDF] Illnesses and Likenesses Richard G. T. Gipps IN THIS RESPONSE to Neil Pickering's paper I shall focus only on what he describes as the "strong objection" to the typical use of the likeness argument. The likeness argument, to recap, has it that we can decide whether conditions such as schizophrenia, depression, or alcoholism do or do not deserve (...)
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  8.  48
    Disturbance of Ego-Boundary Enaction in Schizophrenia.Richard G. T. Gipps - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (1):91-106.
    Today the concept of 'schizophrenia' is often presented in psychiatric texts as a construct, a construct bringing together a diverse and, allegedly, independently assailable range of signs and symptoms. According to such a diagnostic scheme two patients may both be allowed to count as suffering from schizophrenia despite sharing hardly a single symptom. The validity of the concept has accordingly been contested by psychologists for its apparent lack of unity. In the absence of clear independent evidence of a unitary physiological (...)
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  9.  56
    Depression, Sadness and Authenticity.Richard G. T. Gipps - 2015 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 22 (4):307-308.
    Hauptman’s paper tells of a Mr. A, who refused exogenous treatment for the depression he felt consequent on the end of a romantic relationship, because such treatment seems to be inauthentic and despicable. It seemed this way because the depression felt like an apt response to the loss of the beloved.Like Hauptman, I have some sympathy with Mr. A’s position. To medicate away authentic emotional reactions to the trials of living is, it seems to me, to promote a form of (...)
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  10.  43
    Dialectical Virtue and the Philosophy of Psychoanalysis.Richard G. T. Gipps - 2018 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 25 (2):61-63.
    Philosophical engagements with psychoanalysis have taken several forms. Some have offered a philosophical re-vision of psychoanalytical understandings of human nature. Thus, we have Boss, Binswanger, Sartre, and Merleau-Ponty offering us existential-phenomenological; Ricoeur hermeneutic; Lacan structuralist; and Heaton, Elder, and Fingarette Wittgensteinian, readings of unconscious life and of therapeutic action. Such philosophical elaborations of the most apt reflective and the most fruitful revisionary understanding of dynamic unconsciousness also involve parallel critique of such aspects of psychoanalytical psychology's immanent self-understanding as...
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  11.  16
    I've got anxiety.Richard G. T. Gipps - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 56 (1):124-128.
    Journal of Philosophy of Education, Volume 56, Issue 1, Page 124-128, February 2022.
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  12.  78
    Mental disorder and intentional order.Richard G. T. Gipps - 2006 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (2):117-121.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Mental Disorder and Intentional OrderRichard Gipps (bio)Bengt Brülde and Filip Radovic inform the reader that they will assume "there is such a thing as a general category of disorder, of which mental and somatic disorders can be regarded as subcategories" (2006, 100). With this assumption in place, they take up a fascinating discussion of what warrants our categorizations of certain disorders as mental as opposed to physical. The answers (...)
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  13.  55
    Psychoanalysis: Science of the Mind?Richard G. T. Gipps - 2018 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 25 (2):113-118.
    In his paper on 'The Science of Psychoanalysis,' Lacewing helpfully distinguishes a central psychodynamic model of the mind, elaborated in the clinical theory of psychoanalysis, from certain of its metapsychological and etiological theories. Critics who view psychoanalysis as unscientific have tended to focus on the lack of evidential support for certain of its developmental claims or the lack of reliability and validity in its theoretical posits. Lacewing claims, however, that the model contained in the clinical theory is much more scientifically (...)
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  14.  23
    The Order of Disorder.Richard G. T. Gipps - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (3):187-190.
    When assessing a new philosophical theory of psychopathology, a first question might be: is it descriptive or revisionary in intent? Does it aim to provide reflective understanding of what is already meant by correct uses of ‘mental disorder’? Or instead to redeploy that familiar term in articulating a new concept meeting particular desiderata? Nielsen offers us an ‘enactive conceptualization’ of mental disorder, and conceptualizations are typically understood as inventive rather than descriptive. However it was not entirely clear to me, from (...)
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  15.  23
    When Ego-Boundaries Break.Richard G. T. Gipps - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (1):111-113.
    In her commentary, Dibitonto helpfully compares my understanding of schizophrenic ego disturbance with that of Blankenburg. His patient Anne described her true schizophrenic difficulty as obtaining in some sense 'before' those experiential disturbances she can articulate. Ordinary conversational modes misleadingly invite her and us to attempt describing her difficulties in terms which presuppose the intactness of, rather than capture the underlying disturbance to, her self-hood. They fail to locate the disturbance deep enough, fail to grasp how it arises 'before' what (...)
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  16.  17
    Making up the Mind: How the Brain Creates our Mental World.Richard G. T. Gipps - 2009 - Philosophical Psychology 22 (3):393-397.
  17.  31
    Pathology of the Mind: Disorder Versus Disability.Richard G. T. Gipps - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (4):341-344.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Pathology of the Mind: Disorder Versus DisabilityRichard G. T. Gipps (bio)Keywordsorder, disorder, ability, disability, mental illnessAlfredo Gaete (2008) describes mental disorders as impairments in intentionality, phenomenal consciousness, and intelligence that cause harm to the affected person. I found persuasive Gaete’s claim that the concept of ‘mental disorder’ is best understood as nontheoretical and nontechnical. I also find compelling his argument that a previous contribution of my own—which relied in (...)
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  18.  35
    The Background Theory of Delusion and Existential Phenomenology.Richard G. T. Gipps & John Rhodes - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (4):321-326.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Background Theory of Delusion and Existential PhenomenologyRichard G. T. Gipps (bio) and John Rhodes (bio)KeywordsPhenomenology, psychological explanation, epistemology, schizophreniaSituating and Clarifying the PaperThe commentaries of Nassir Ghaemi and Giovanni Stanghellini help to sketch out the intellectual landscape of philosophical perspectives in psychiatry, and situate our paper within it. A happy convergence between the analytical philosophy perspective from which we were writing, and the existential–phenomenological paradigm described by both (...)
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