Results for 'Richard Arthur Baer'

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  1.  51
    Philo's Use of the Categories Male and Female.Richard Arthur Baer - 1970 - Leiden: Brill.
    The themes of becoming male, becoming one, and becoming a virgin, although by no means dominant motifs in Philo's writings, were seen to be thoroughly consistent with his wider usage of the categories male and female. The earlier ...
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  2.  10
    A Micro-Ethnographic Study of Big Data-Based Innovation in the Financial Services Sector: Governance, Ethics and Organisational Practices.Richard Owen & Keren Arthur - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (2):363-375.
    Our study considers the governance, ethics and operational challenges associated with the acquisition, manipulation and commodification of ‘big data’ in the financial services sector. To the best of our knowledge, there are no published studies describing empirical research undertaken within companies in this sector to understand how they are responding to such challenges: our field-based research is a significant initial contribution in this respect. We describe the results of a micro-ethnographic study undertaken in a small-to-medium-sized company developing disruptive, technology-related platforms (...)
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  3. Leibniz.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2014 - Polity.
    Few philosophers have left a legacy like that of Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. He has been credited not only with inventing the differential calculus, but also with anticipating the basic ideas of modern logic, information science, and fractal geometry. He made important contributions to such diverse fields as jurisprudence, geology and etymology, while sketching designs for calculating machines, wind pumps, and submarines. But the common presentation of his philosophy as a kind of unworldly idealism is at odds with all this bustling (...)
     
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  4. Richard Arthur Wollheim, 1923-2003.Malcolm Budd - 2005 - In Proceedings of the British Academy Volume 130, Biographical Memoirs of Fellows, IV. pp. 227-246.
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  5.  19
    Woolheim, Richard Arthur.Graham McFee - unknown
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  6.  15
    An Appreciation of Richard Arthur.Massimo Mugnai - 2018 - The Leibniz Review 28:1-7.
    This is an appreciation of Richard Arthur, assessing his contributions to Leibniz studies and recounting the nature of our friendship over the past 30 years.
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  7.  21
    Natural Deduction: An Introduction to Logic with Real Arguments, a Little History and Some Humour.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2011 - Peterborough, Ontario, Canada: Broadview Press.
    Richard Arthur’s _Natural Deduction_ provides a wide-ranging introduction to logic. In lively and readable prose, Arthur presents a new approach to the study of logic, one that seeks to integrate methods of argument analysis developed in modern “informal logic” with natural deduction techniques. The dry bones of logic are given flesh by unusual attention to the history of the subject, from Pythagoras, the Stoics, and Indian Buddhist logic, through Lewis Carroll, Venn, and Boole, to Russell, Frege, and (...)
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  8.  41
    Monads, Composition, and Force: Ariadnean Threads Through Leibniz’s Labyrinth, by Richard Arthur[REVIEW]Julia Jorati - 2020 - Mind 129 (514):664-673.
    Monads, Composition, and Force: Ariadnean Threads through Leibniz’s Labyrinth, by ArthurRichard. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. Pp. ix + 329.
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  9. The Labyrinth of the Continuum: Writings on the Continuum Problem, 1672-1686.Richard T. W. Arthur (ed.) - 2001 - Yale University Press.
    This book gathers together for the first time an important body of texts written between 1672 and 1686 by the great German philosopher and polymath Gottfried Leibniz. These writings, most of them previously untranslated, represent Leibniz’s sustained attempt on a problem whose solution was crucial to the development of his thought, that of the composition of the continuum. The volume begins with excerpts from Leibniz’s Paris writings, in which he tackles such problems as whether the infinite division of matter entails (...)
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  10.  1
    Richard Hooker, of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity: A Critical Edition with Modern Spelling.Arthur Stephen McGrade (ed.) - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    This is an accessible language edition of Richard Hooker's Of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity, the major prose work of the English 16th century.
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  11.  20
    The Philosophy of Rudolf Carnap.Richard C. Jeffrey & Paul Arthur Schilpp - 1966 - Philosophical Review 75 (4):534.
  12.  14
    The Reality of Time Flow: Local Becoming in Modern Physics.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2019 - Springer Verlag.
    It is commonly held that there is no place for the 'now’ in physics, and also that the passing of time is something subjective, having to do with the way reality is experienced but not with the way reality is. Indeed, the majority of modern theoretical physicists and philosophers of physics contend that the passing of time is incompatible with modern physical theory, and excluded in a fundamental description of physical reality. This book provides a forceful rebuttal of such claims. (...)
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  13. Monads, Composition, and Force: Ariadnean Threads Through Leibniz's Labyrinth.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    In this new work, Richard T. W. Arthur offers a fresh interpretation of Leibniz's theory of substance. He goes against a long trend of idealistic interpretations of Leibniz's thought by instead taking seriously Leibniz's claim of introducing monads to solve the problem of the composition of matter and motion.
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  14.  42
    Seeing the Whole Picture.Richard Norgaard & Paul Baer - 2003 - World Futures 59 (3 & 4):225 – 239.
    Much of what we need to plan for our survival is already known, but what we know, how we know, and who knows is divided up between disciplines. Thus much of the problem of ensuring our survival is a matter of learning across the disciplines. We identify four modes through which we bring disciplinary knowledge together: the unity of science, integrated assessment, heuristic models, and distributed learning networks. Although none of them are perfect, we can learn how to put our (...)
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  15.  2
    Esotericism, Art, and Imagination.Arthur Versluis, Lee Irwin, John Richards & Melinda Weinstein (eds.) - 2008 - Michigan State University Press.
    _Esotericism, Art, and Imagination_ is a uniquely wide- ranging collection of articles by scholars in the field of Western esotericism, focusing on themes of poetry, drama, film, literature, and art. Included here are articles illuminating such diverse topics as the Gnostic fiction of Philip Pullman, alchemical images, the Tarot, surrealism, esoteric films, and much more. This collection reveals the richness and complexity of the intersections between esotericism, artistic creators, and their works. Authors include Joscelyn Godwin, Cathy Gutierrez, M. E. Warlick, (...)
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  16.  82
    Leery Bedfellows: Newton and Leibniz on the Status of Infinitesimals.Richard Arthur - 2008 - In Douglas Jesseph & Ursula Goldenbaum (eds.), Infinitesimal Differences: Controversies Between Leibniz and His Contemporaries. Walter de Gruyter.
    Newton and Leibniz had profound disagreements concerning metaphysics and the relationship of mathematics to natural philosophy, as well as deeply opposed attitudes towards analysis. Nevertheless, or so I shall argue, despite these deeply held and distracting differences in their background assumptions and metaphysical views, there was a considerable consilience in their positions on the status of infinitesimals. In this paper I compare the foundation Newton provides in his Method Of First and Ultimate Ratios (sketched at some time between 1671 and (...)
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  17. On Thought Experiments as a Priori Science.Richard Arthur - 1999 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 13 (3):215 – 229.
    Against Norton's claim that all thought experiments can be reduced to explicit arguments, I defend Brown's position that certain thought experiments yield a priori knowledge. They do this, I argue, not by allowing us to perceive “Platonic universals” (Brown), even though they may contain non-propositional components that are epistemically indispensable, but by helping to identify certain tacit presuppositions or “natural interpretations” (Feyerabend's term) that lead to a contradiction when the phenomenon is described in terms of them, and by suggesting a (...)
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  18. Space and Relativity in Newton and Leibniz.Richard Arthur - 1994 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (1):219-240.
    In this paper I challenge the usual interpretations of Newton's and Leibniz's views on the nature of space and the relativity of motion. Newton's ‘relative space’ is not a reference frame; and Leibniz did not regard space as defined with respect to actual enduring bodies. Newton did not subscribe to the relativity of intertial motions; whereas Leibniz believed no body to be at rest, and Newton's absolute motion to be a useful fiction. A more accurate rendering of the opposition between (...)
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  19. Minkowski Spacetime and the Dimensions of the Present.Richard T. W. Arthur - unknown
    In Minkowski spacetime, because of the relativity of simultaneity to the inertial frame chosen, there is no unique world-at-an-instant. Thus the classical view that there is a unique set of events existing now in a three dimensional space cannot be sustained. The two solutions most often advanced are that the four-dimensional structure of events and processes is alone real, and that becoming present is not an objective part of reality; and that present existence is not an absolute notion, but is (...)
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  20. Presupposition, Aggregation, and Leibniz’s Argument for a Plurality of Substances.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2011 - The Leibniz Review 21:91-115.
    This paper consists in a study of Leibniz’s argument for the infinite plurality of substances, versions of which recur throughout his mature corpus. It goes roughly as follows: since every body is actually divided into further bodies, it is therefore not a unity but an infinite aggregate; the reality of an aggregate, however, reduces to the reality of the unities it presupposes; the reality of body, therefore, entails an actual infinity of constituent unities everywhere in it. I argue that this (...)
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  21.  16
    Stray The Owl of Minerva: The Cambridge Praelections of 1906. Reassessments of Richard Jebb, James Adam, Walter Headlam, Henry Jackson, William Ridgeway, and Arthur Verrall. Pp. Viii + 172, Ills. Cambridge: Cambridge Philological Society, 2005. Paper. ISBN: 0-906014-27-1. [REVIEW]Richard Jenkyns - 2006 - The Classical Review 56 (2):511-512.
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  22.  92
    Leibniz and Clarke: A Study of Their Correspondence.Richard Arthur - 2001 - Mind 110 (439):874-878.
  23.  34
    Stray (C.) (Ed.) The Owl of Minerva: The Cambridge Praelections of 1906. Reassessments of Richard Jebb, James Adam, Walter Headlam, Henry Jackson, William Ridgeway, and Arthur Verrall. (Proceedings of the Cambridge Philological Society Supplementary Volume 28.) Pp. Viii + 172, Ills. Cambridge: Cambridge Philological Society, 2005. Paper. ISBN: 0-906014-27-. [REVIEW]Richard Jenkyns - 2006 - The Classical Review 56 (02):511-.
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  24. Leibniz’s Theory of Space.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2013 - Foundations of Science 18 (3):499-528.
    In this paper I offer a fresh interpretation of Leibniz’s theory of space, in which I explain the connection of his relational theory to both his mathematical theory of analysis situs and his theory of substance. I argue that the elements of his mature theory are not bare bodies (as on a standard relationalist view) nor bare points (as on an absolutist view), but situations. Regarded as an accident of an individual body, a situation is the complex of its angles (...)
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  25. Time Lapse and the Degeneracy of Time: Gödel, Proper Time and Becoming in Relativity Theory.Richard T. W. Arthur - unknown
    In the transition to Einstein’s theory of Special Relativity (SR), certain concepts that had previously been thought to be univocal or absolute properties of systems turn out not to be. For instance, mass bifurcates into (i) the relativistically invariant proper mass m0, and (ii) the mass relative to an inertial frame in which it is moving at a speed v = βc, its relative mass m, whose quantity is a factor γ = (1 – β2) -1/2 times the proper mass, (...)
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  26. Newton's Fluxions and Equably Flowing Time.Richard T. W. Arthur - 1995 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 26 (2):323-351.
  27.  62
    Leibniz on Infinite Number, Infinite Wholes, and the Whole World: A Reply to Gregory Brown.Richard Arthur - 2001 - The Leibniz Review 11:103-116.
    Reductio arguments are notoriously inconclusive, a fact which no doubt contributes to their great fecundity. For once a contradiction has been proved, it is open to interpretation which premise should be given up. Indeed, it is often a matter of great creativity to identify what can be consistently given up. A case in point is a traditional paradox of the infinite provided by Galileo Galilei in his Two New Sciences, which has since come to be known as Galileo’s Paradox. It (...)
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  28.  61
    Infinite Number and the World Soul; in Defence of Carlin and Leibniz.Richard Arthur - 1999 - The Leibniz Review 9:105-116.
    In last year’s Review Gregory Brown took issue with Laurence Carlin’s interpretation of Leibniz’s argument as to why there could be no world soul. Carlin’s contention, in Brown’s words, is that Leibniz denies a soul to the world but not to bodies on the grounds that “while both the world and [an] aggregate of limited spatial extent are infinite in multitude, the former, but not the latter, is infinite in respect of magnitude and hence cannot be considered a whole”. Brown (...)
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  29.  15
    Theology and Agricultural Ethics at State Universities: A Rejoinder. [REVIEW]Richard A. Baer - 1989 - Agriculture and Human Values 6 (3):99-104.
    Michael Eldridge's critique of the author's earlier paper on the place of theology in agricultural ethics at state universities fails in at least three places: (1) Eldridge presents an inadequate picture of how basic assumptions function in human thinking and misuses terms like “public,” “private,” “particular,” “empirical,” and “common experience”; (2) he wrongly distinguishes between philosophers and theologians on the bais of their openness to new data, ideas, and public criticism; (3) he misunderstands the meaning of the First Amendment. (...) argues that whenever faculty at a state university deal with the Big Questions—who we are, how we should live, and what it all means—they must be seen, for First Amendment purposes, as operating within the realm of religion. Without such a functional definition of religion, the state will inevitably give unfair advantage to nontheistic, secular answers to the Big Questions. Eldridge is wrong to claim that Dewey escapes the liabilities of particularity and parochialism in a way that theologians do not. He also misunderstands the nature of the First Amendment when he argues that public schools may legitimately propagate Dewey's naturalistic variety of “religion.” Baer claims that when state universities address the Big Questions, the demands of public justice will be met only if theologians participate in the discussion and debate. (shrink)
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  30.  8
    Question Answering in the Context of Stories.Arthur C. Graesser, Kathy L. Lang & Richard M. Roberts - 1991 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 120 (3):254-277.
  31.  35
    Continuous Creation, Continuous Time: A Refutation of the Alleged Discontinuity of Cartesian Time.Richard Arthur - 1988 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (3):349-375.
  32.  9
    Life, Death, and Meaning: Key Philosophical Readings on the Big Questions.Margaret A. Boden, Richard B. Brandt, Peter Caldwell, Fred Feldman, John Martin Fischer, Richard Hare, David Hume, W. D. Joske, Immanuel Kant, Frederick Kaufman, James Lenman, John Leslie, Steven Luper-Foy, Michaelis Michael, Thomas Nagel, Robert Nozick, Derek Parfit, George Pitcher, Stephen E. Rosenbaum, David Schmidtz, Arthur Schopenhauer, David B. Suits, Richard Taylor & Bernard Williams - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Do our lives have meaning? Should we create more people? Is death bad? Should we commit suicide? Would it be better if we were immortal? Should we be optimistic or pessimistic? Life, Death, and Meaning brings together key readings, primarily by English-speaking philosophers, on such 'big questions.'.
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  33.  13
    Event Observation in Probability Learning.Arthur S. Reber & Richard B. Millward - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (2):317.
  34.  1
    Leibniz’s Syncategorematic Actual Infinite.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2018 - In Igor Agostini, Richard T. W. Arthur, Geoffrey Gorham, Paul Guyer, Mogens Lærke, Yitzhak Y. Melamed, Ohad Nachtomy, Sanja Särman, Anat Schechtman, Noa Shein & Reed Winegar (eds.), Infinity in Early Modern Philosophy. Springer Verlag. pp. 155-179.
    It is well known that Leibniz advocated the actual infinite, but that he did not admit infinite collections or infinite numbers. But his assimilation of this account to the scholastic notion of the syncategorematic infinite has given rise to controversy. A common interpretation is that in mathematics Leibniz’s syncategorematic infinite is identical with the Aristotelian potential infinite, so that it applies only to ideal entities, and is therefore distinct from the actual infinite that applies to the actual world. Against this, (...)
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  35. Leibniz’s Actual Infinite in Relation to His Analysis of Matter.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2015 - In David Rabouin, Philip Beeley & Norma B. Goethe (eds.), G.W. Leibniz, Interrelations Between Mathematics and Philosophy. Springer Verlag.
  36.  12
    King Arthur: Hero and Legend. Richard Barber.Norris J. Lacy - 1988 - Speculum 63 (4):896-898.
  37.  25
    Geoffrey Hellman* and Stewart Shapiro.**Varieties of Continua—From Regions to Points and Back.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2019 - Philosophia Mathematica 27 (1):148-152.
    HellmanGeoffrey* * and ShapiroStewart.** ** Varieties of Continua—From Regions to Points and Back. Oxford University Press, 2018. ISBN: 978-0-19-871274-9. Pp. x + 208.
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  38. Actual Infinitesimals in Leibniz's Early Thought.Richard T. W. Arthur - unknown
    Before establishing his mature interpretation of infinitesimals as fictions, Gottfried Leibniz had advocated their existence as actually existing entities in the continuum. In this paper I trace the development of these early attempts, distinguishing three distinct phases in his interpretation of infinitesimals prior to his adopting a fictionalist interpretation: (i) (1669) the continuum consists of assignable points separated by unassignable gaps; (ii) (1670-71) the continuum is composed of an infinity of indivisible points, or parts smaller than any assignable, with no (...)
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  39. Exacting a Philosophy of Becoming From Modern Physics.Richard T. W. Arthur - 1982 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 63 (2):101.
  40.  61
    Leibniz and the Natural World: Activity, Passivity and Corporeal Substances in Leibniz's Philosophy? Pauline Phemister. [REVIEW]Richard Arthur - 2007 - Philosophical Quarterly 57 (226):133-137.
  41.  21
    Karl Ernst Von Baer.Robert Richards - manuscript
    in Harvard Companion to the History of Science, ed. Michael Ruse (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2007).
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  42.  12
    Agricultural Ethics at State Universities: Why No Input From the Theologians? [REVIEW]Richard A. Baer - 1985 - Agriculture and Human Values 2 (4):41-46.
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  43.  46
    Infinite Aggregates and Phenomenal Wholes: Leibniz's Theory of Substance as a Solution to the Continuum Problem.Richard Arthur - 1998 - The Leibniz Review 8:25-45.
  44.  1
    Leibniz’s Syncategorematic Infinitesimals.Richard T. W. Arthur - 2013 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 67 (5):553-593.
    In contrast with some recent theories of infinitesimals as non-Archimedean entities, Leibniz’s mature interpretation was fully in accord with the Archimedean Axiom: infinitesimals are fictions, whose treatment as entities incomparably smaller than finite quantities is justifiable wholly in terms of variable finite quantities that can be taken as small as desired, i.e. syncategorematically. In this paper I explain this syncategorematic interpretation, and how Leibniz used it to justify the calculus. I then compare it with the approach of Smooth Infinitesimal Analysis, (...)
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  45.  19
    Leibniz’s Syncategorematic Infinitesimals II: Their Existence, Their Use and Their Role in the Justification of the Differential Calculus.David Rabouin & Richard T. W. Arthur - 2020 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 74 (5):401-443.
    In this paper, we endeavour to give a historically accurate presentation of how Leibniz understood his infinitesimals, and how he justified their use. Some authors claim that when Leibniz called them “fictions” in response to the criticisms of the calculus by Rolle and others at the turn of the century, he had in mind a different meaning of “fiction” than in his earlier work, involving a commitment to their existence as non-Archimedean elements of the continuum. Against this, we show that (...)
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  46. Beeckman, Descartes and the Force of Motion.Richard Arthur - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):1-28.
    In this reassessment of Descartes' debt to his mentor Isaac Beeckman, I argue that they share the same basic conception of motion: the force of a body's motion—understood as the force of persisting in that motion, shorn of any connotations of internal cause—is conserved through God's direct action, is proportional to the speed and magnitude of the body, and is gained or lost only through collisions. I contend that this constitutes a fully coherent ontology of motion, original with Beeckman and (...)
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  47. Noel Carroll (1947-).Richard Wollheim & Arthur Danto - 2007 - In Diarmuid Costello & Jonathan Vickery (eds.), Art: Key Contemporary Thinkers. Berg. pp. 106.
     
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  48.  38
    Sophisticated Voting Under the Plurality Procedure: A Test of a New Definition. [REVIEW]Richard G. Niemi & Arthur Q. Frank - 1985 - Theory and Decision 19 (2):151-162.
  49.  17
    Infinite Aggregates and Phenomenal Wholes: Leibniz’s Theory of Substance as a Solution to the Continuum Problem.Richard Arthur - 1998 - The Leibniz Review 8:25-45.
  50.  7
    On the Significance of A. A. Robb’s Philosophy of Time, Especially in Relation to Bertrand Russell's.Richard T. W. Arthur - forthcoming - British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-23.
    The aim of this paper is to explain the significance of Alfred A. Robb’s philosophy of time stemming from his interpretation of relativity theory; and at the same time, to investigate the reasons f...
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