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  1. Cross-Situational Learning: An Experimental Study of Word-Learning Mechanisms.Kenny Smith, Andrew D. M. Smith & Richard A. Blythe - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (3):480-498.
    Cross-situational learning is a mechanism for learning the meaning of words across multiple exposures, despite exposure-by-exposure uncertainty as to the word's true meaning. We present experimental evidence showing that humans learn words effectively using cross-situational learning, even at high levels of referential uncertainty. Both overall success rates and the time taken to learn words are affected by the degree of referential uncertainty, with greater referential uncertainty leading to less reliable, slower learning. Words are also learned less successfully and more slowly (...)
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    Word learning under infinite uncertainty.Richard A. Blythe, Andrew D. M. Smith & Kenny Smith - 2016 - Cognition 151 (C):18-27.
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    Learning Times for Large Lexicons Through Cross‐Situational Learning.Richard A. Blythe, Kenny Smith & Andrew D. M. Smith - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (4):620-642.
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  4.  30
    Conceptual Similarity and Communicative Need Shape Colexification: An Experimental Study.Andres Karjus, Richard A. Blythe, Simon Kirby, Tianyu Wang & Kenny Smith - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (9):e13035.
    Colexification refers to the phenomenon of multiple meanings sharing one word in a language. Cross‐linguistic lexification patterns have been shown to be largely predictable, as similar concepts are often colexified. We test a recent claim that, beyond this general tendency, communicative needs play an important role in shaping colexification patterns. We approach this question by means of a series of human experiments, using an artificial language communication game paradigm. Our results across four experiments match the previous cross‐linguistic findings: all other (...)
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