Results for 'Riachard J. Regan'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  4
    Compendium of Theology by Thomas Aquinas.Riachard J. Regan - 2009 - Oup Usa.
    Towards the end of his life St. Thomas Aquinas produced a brief, nontechnical work summarizing some of the main points of his massive Summa Theologiae. This 'compendium' was intended as an introductory handbook for students and scholars who might not have access to the larger work. It remains the best concise introduction to Aquinas's thought. Richard Regan is a highly respected Aquinas translator, who here relies on the definitive Leonine edition of the Latin text. His work will be received (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Discussion of J. Kevin O’Regan’s “Why Red Doesn’T Sound Like a Bell: Understanding the Feel of Consciousness”.J. Kevin O’Regan & Ned Block - 2012 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (1):89-108.
    Discussion of J. Kevin O’Regan’s “Why Red Doesn’t Sound Like a Bell: Understanding the Feel of Consciousness” Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-20 DOI 10.1007/s13164-012-0090-7 Authors J. Kevin O’Regan, Laboratoire Psychologie de la Perception, CNRS - Université Paris Descartes, Centre Biomédical des Saints Pères, 45 rue des Sts Pères, 75270 Paris cedex 06, France Ned Block, Departments of Philosophy, Psychology and Center for Neural Science, New York University, 5 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003, USA Journal Review of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  3.  85
    Sartre, Woody Allen, and Authenticity.S. J. Thomas J. Regan - 1991 - Teaching Philosophy 14 (4):409-419.
  4.  72
    Animating Rawls's Original Position.S. J. Thomas J. Regan - 1996 - Teaching Philosophy 19 (4):357-370.
    This paper presents a design for a social and political philosophy course for fourth- and fifth-year undergraduates. The theoretical foundation of the courses is based upon Rawls' theory of original position as a starting point to engage with the history of political thought. Students are able to approach problems in the history philosophy through a practical investigation of contemporary structural issues in public policy. The success of the course lies in students’ engagement with an in-class theoretical and hands-on research project (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  25
    Supreme Court Roundup.S. Richard J. Regan - 1989 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 64 (2):176-187.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  23
    Supreme Court Roundup.S. Richard J. Regan - 1987 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 62 (2):234-246.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. The 'Feel'of Seeing:: An Interview with J. Kevin O'Regan.J. Kevin O'Regan - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (6):278-279.
  8.  6
    What Would the Robots Play? Interview with J. Kevin O’Regan.J. Kevin O’Regan, Włodzisław Duch, Przemysław Nowakowski & Witold Wachowski - 2011 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 2 (2).
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  12
    The Moral Dimensions of Politics. By Richard J. Regan.John A. Gueguen - 1991 - Modern Schoolman 68 (2):175-176.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  8
    The Power of God. By Thomas Aquinas. Translated and Abridged by Richard J. Regan. Pp. Xxiv, 323, Oxford/NY, Oxford University Press, 2012, $36.95. [REVIEW]Douglas McDermid - 2016 - Heythrop Journal 57 (2):425-426.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. On Law, Morality, and Politics.William P. Thomas, Richard J. Baumgarth & Regan - 1988
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  2
    Just War: Principles and Cases.Richard J. Regan - 1996 - Catholic University of America Press.
    Most individuals realise that we have a moral obligation to avoid the evils of war. But this realization raises a host of difficult questions when we, as responsible individuals, witness harrowing injustices such as ""ethnic cleansing"" in Bosnia or starvation in Somalia. With millions of lives at stake, is war ever justified? And, if so, for what purpose? In this book, Richard J. Regan confronts these controversial questions by first considering the basic principles of just-war theory and then applying (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  13.  83
    Why Red Doesn't Sound Like a Bell: Understanding the Feel of Consciousness.J. K. O'Regan - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    The catastrophe of the eye -- A new view of seeing -- Applying the new view of seeing -- The illusion of seeing everything -- Some contentious points -- Towards consciousness -- Types of consciousness -- Phenomenal consciousness, raw feel, and why they're hard -- Squeeze a sponge, drive a porsche : a sensorimotor account of feel -- Consciously experiencing a feel -- The sensorimotor approach to color -- Sensory substitution -- The localization of touch -- The phenomenality plot -- (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  14. A Sensorimotor Account of Vision and Visual Consciousness.J. Kevin O’Regan & Alva Noë - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):883-917.
    Many current neurophysiological, psychophysical, and psychological approaches to vision rest on the idea that when we see, the brain produces an internal representation of the world. The activation of this internal representation is assumed to give rise to the experience of seeing. The problem with this kind of approach is that it leaves unexplained how the existence of such a detailed internal representation might produce visual consciousness. An alternative proposal is made here. We propose that seeing is a way of (...)
    Direct download (16 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   698 citations  
  15. Solving the "Real" Mysteries of Visual Perception: The World as an Outside Memory.Kevin J. O'Regan - 1992 - Canadian Journal of Psychology 46:461-88.
  16. Picture Changes During Blinks: Looking Without Seeing and Seeing Without Looking.J. Kevin O'Regan, H. Deubel, James J. Clark & Ronald A. Rensink - 2000 - Visual Cognition 7:191-211.
    Observers inspected normal, high quality color displays of everyday visual scenes while their eye movements were recorded. A large display change occurred each time an eye blink occurred. Display changes could either involve "Central Interest" or "Marginal Interest" locations, as determined from descriptions obtained from independent judges in a prior pilot experiment. Visual salience, as determined by luminance, color, and position of the Central and Marginal interest changes were equalized. -/- The results obtained were very similar to those obtained in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  17.  48
    The De Malo of Thomas Aquinas: With Facing-Page Translation by Richard Regan.Saint Thomas, van Aquino Thomas, Thomas Aquinas & Richard J. Regan - 2001 - Oxford University Press, Usa.
    The De Malo represents some of St. Thomas Aquinas' most mature thinking on goodness, badness, and human agency. Together with the second part of the Summa Theologiae, it is one of his most sustained contributions to moral philosophy and theology. Aquinas examines the full range of questions associated with evil: its origin, its nature, its variety, its relation to good, and its compatibility with the existence of an omnipotent, benevolent God. This edition offers the Leonine Commission's authoritative edition of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  50
    Change Blindness as a Result of Mudsplashes.Kevin J. O'Regan, Ronald A. Rensink & James J. Clark - 1999 - Nature 398 (6722):34-34.
    Change-blindness occurs when large changes are missed under natural viewing conditions because they occur simultaneously with a brief visual disruption, perhaps caused by an eye movement, a flicker, a blink, or a camera cut in a film sequence. We have found that this can occur even when the disruption does not cover or obscure the changes. When a few small, high-contrast shapes are briefly spattered over a picture, like mudsplashes on a car windscreen, large changes can be made simultaneously in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  19.  29
    The Cardinal Virtues: Prudence, Justice, Fortitude, and Temperance.Thomas Aquinas & Richard J. Regan - 2005 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    Richard J. Regan's new translation of texts from Thomas Aquinas' _Summa Theologica_ II–II--on the virtues prudence, justice, fortitude, and temperance--combines accuracy with an accessibility unmatched by previous presentations of these texts. While remaining true to Aquinas' Latin and preserving a question-and-answer format, the translation judiciously omits references and citations unessential to the primary argument. It thereby clears a path through the original especially suitable for beginning students of Aquinas. Regan's Introduction carefully situates Aquinas' analysis of these virtues within (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. What It is Like to See: A Sensorimotor Theory of Perceptual Experience.J. Kevin O’Regan - 2001 - Synthese 129 (1):79-103.
    The paper proposes a way of bridging the gapbetween physical processes in the brain and the ''''felt''''aspect of sensory experience. The approach is based onthe idea that experience is not generated by brainprocesses themselves, but rather is constituted by theway these brain processes enable a particular form of''''give-and-take'''' between the perceiver and theenvironment. From this starting-point we are able tocharacterize the phenomenological differences betweenthe different sensory modalities in a more principledway than has been done in the past. We are also (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   77 citations  
  21. The de Malo of Thomas Aquinas.Brian Davies & Richard J. Regan - 2001
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  68
    Skill, Corporality and Alerting Capacity in an Account of Sensory Consciousness.J. Kevin O'Regan, Erik Myin & Alva Noë - 2006 - In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  23. A Sensorimotor Account of Vision and Visual Consciousness-Authors' Response-Acting Out Our Sensory Experience.J. Kevin O'Regan & A. Noe - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):1011.
  24.  10
    On Law, Morality, and Politics.William P. Baumgarth & Richard J. Regan (eds.) - 2003 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    The second edition of Aquinas, _On Law, Morality, and Politics _ retains the selection of texts presented in the first edition but offers them in new translations by Richard J. Regan--including that of his Aquinas, _Treatise on Law_. A revised Introduction and glossary, an updated select bibliography, and the inclusion of summarizing headnotes for each of the units--Conscience, Law, Justice, Property, War and Killing, Obedience and Rebellion, and Practical Wisdom and Statecraft—further enhance its usefulness.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  8
    How the Sensorimotor Approach to Consciousness Bridges Both Comparative and Absolute Explanatory Gaps: And Some Refinements of the Theory.J. K. O'Regan - 2016 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 23 (5-6):39-65.
    The problem of understanding how physical processes in the brain could give rise to consciousness has been identified with the 'comparative explanatory gap', the problem of explaining why different experiences have the differing qualities they do, and the 'absolute explanatory gap', the problem of explaining why anything can be conscious at all. The main innovation of the sensorimotor theory is that it provides a very appealing way of closing the comparative gap by postulating that the quality of experiences corresponds to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26.  51
    Experience is Not Something We Feel but Something We Do: A Principled Way of Explaining Sensory Phenomenology, with Change Blindness and Other Empirical Consequences.J. Kevin O'Regan - unknown
    Any theory of experience which postulates that brain mechanisms generate "raw feel" encounters the impassable "explanatory gap" separating physics from phenomenology.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27. How to Build a Robot That is Conscious and Feels.J. Kevin O’Regan - 2012 - Minds and Machines 22 (2):117-136.
    Following arguments put forward in my book (Why red doesn’t sound like a bell: understanding the feel of consciousness. Oxford University Press, New York, USA, 2011), this article takes a pragmatic, scientist’s point of view about the concepts of consciousness and “feel”, pinning down what people generally mean when they talk about these concepts, and then investigating to what extent these capacities could be implemented in non-biological machines. Although the question of “feel”, or “phenomenal consciousness” as it is called by (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  28.  18
    Phenomenal Consciousness Explained (Better) in Terms of Bodiliness and Grabbiness.J. Kevin O’Regan, Erik Myin & Alva NOë - 2005 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (4):369-387.
    How could neural processes be associated with phenomenal consciousness? We present a way to answer this question by taking the counterintuitive stance that the sensory feel of an experience is not a thing that happens to us, but a thing we do: a skill we exercise. By additionally noting that sensory systems possess two important, objectively measurable properties, corporality and alerting capacity, we are able to explain why sensory experience possesses a sensory feel, but thinking and other mental processes do (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  29.  20
    For Peer Review.J. Kevin O'Regan - unknown
    Call u the triplet of cone quantum catch for the light that is incident on a surface, and v the triplet of cone quantum catch for the light that is reflected off that surface. Philipona & O'Regan (2006) present results from numerical calculations showing that: 1. each surface can be associated with a 3 by 3 matrix A such that the relation v = A u to a very high degree of accuracy for any natural illuminant, 2. the vast (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  36
    Skill, Corporality and Alerting Capacity in an Account of Sensory Consciousness.Kevin J. O'Regan - 2005
  31.  92
    Toward an Analytic Phenomenology: The Concepts of "Bodiliness" and "Grabbiness".Kevin J. O'Regan, Erik Myin & No - 2001 - In A. Carsetti (ed.), Seeing and Thinking. Reflections on Kanizsa's Studies in Visual Cognition. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    In this paper, we present an account of phenomenal con- sciousness. Phenomenal consciousness is experience, and the _problem _of phenomenal consciousness is to explain how physical processes.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32.  97
    Explaining What People Say About Sensory Qualia.J. Kevin O'Regan - 2010 - In N. Gangopadhay, M. Madary & F. Spicer (eds.), Perception, Action, and Consciousness. Oxford University Press. pp. 31--50.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  77
    Acting Out Our Sensory Experience.J. Kevin O'Regan & Alva Noë - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):1011-1021.
    The most important clarification we bring in our reply to commentators concerns the problem of the “explanatory gap”: that is, the gulf that separates physical processes in the brain from the experienced quality of sensations. By adding two concepts (bodiliness and grabbiness) that were not stressed in the target article, we strengthen our claim and clarify why we think we have solved the explanatory gap problem, – not by dismissing qualia, but, on the contrary, by explaining why sensations have a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  34.  45
    Perceptual Consciousness, Access to Modality and Skill Theories: A Way to Naturalize Phenomenology?Erik Myin & J. Kevin O'Regan - 2002 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (1):27-45.
    We address the thesis recently proposed by Andy Clark, that skill-mediated access to modality implies phenomenal feel. We agree that a skill theory of perception does indeed offer the possibility of a satisfactory account of the feel of perception, but we claim that this is not only through explanation of access to modality but also because skill actually provides access to perceptual property in general. We illustrate and substantiate our claims by reference to the recently proposed 'sensorimotor contingency' theory of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   46 citations  
  35. Sensorimotor Theory and Enactivism.Jan Degenaar & J. Kevin O’Regan - 2017 - Topoi 36 (3):393-407.
    The sensorimotor theory of perceptual consciousness offers a form of enactivism in that it stresses patterns of interaction instead of any alleged internal representations of the environment. But how does it relate to forms of enactivism stressing the continuity between life and mind? We shall distinguish sensorimotor enactivism, which stresses perceptual capacities themselves, from autopoietic enactivism, which claims an essential connection between experience and autopoietic processes or associated background capacities. We show how autopoiesis, autonomous agency, and affective dimensions of experience (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  36. Why Red Looks Red Rather Than Sounding Like a Bell.J. O’Regan - 2010 - Humana Mente 4 (14).
  37. The Moral Dimensions of Politics.Richard J. Regan - 1986 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    This book explores the moral dimensions of public policy from an Aristotelian-Thomistic perspective. Regan begins with a thorough exposition of natural law theory and proposes ways in which ethical conclusions can be drawn from it. He then goes on to link natural law theory to an analysis of particular areas of public policy as diverse as public morals, social justice, and the morality of warfare.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  2
    The Power of God: By Thomas Aquinas.Richard J. Regan (ed.) - 2012 - Oxford University Press USA.
    In the De potentia, Thomas Aquinas runs a series of disputations on the power of God. The treatise considers ten questions related to God's power to create external things, namely the universe, angels, and human beings. His explanation of creation here is the most developed treatment found in any of his writings, but the principal purpose of the work is to analyze the internal life of God--that is, the Trinity. According to Aquinas, we predicate the Persons of the Trinity as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  21
    Letter Legibility and Visual Word Recognition.J. Kevin O'Regan - unknown
    Word recognition performance varies systematically as a function of where the eyes fixate in the word. Performance is maximal with the eye slightly left of the center of the word, and decreases drastically to both sides of this 'Optimal Viewing Position'. While manipulations of lexical factors have only marginal effects on this phenomenon, previous studies have pointed to a relation between the viewing position effect and letter legibility: When letter legibility drops, the viewing position effect becomes more exaggerated. To further (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40. Sensorimotor Approach to (Phenomenal) Consciousness.J. Kevin O'Regan - 2009 - In Bayne Tim, Cleeremans Axel & Wilken Patrick (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Consciousness. Oxford University Press. pp. 588--593.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  31
    How to Build a Robot That Feels.J. Kevin O'Regan - unknown
    Overview. Consciousness is often considered to have a "hard" part and a not-so-hard part. With the help of work in artificial intelligence and more recently in embodied robotics, there is hope that we shall be able solve the not-so-hard part and make artificial agents that understand their environment, communicate with their friends, and most importantly, have a notion of "self" and "others". But will such agents feel anything? Building the feel into the agent will be the "hard" part.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  21
    Thoughts on Change Blindness.J. K. O'Regan - unknown
    Recent results showing that large changes in a scene are not noticed if they occur at the same time as a global visual disturbance caused by saccades, flicker, "mudsplashes", or film cuts, are generally explained in terms of a theory in which it is assumed that the observer's internal representation of the outside world is very sparse, containing only what the observer is currently processing. The present paper presents some clarifications of the theory, and some new implications and predictions that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  32
    Change Blindness.J. Kevin O'Regan - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
  44.  5
    Individual Differences and Hemispheric Asymmetries for Language and Spatial Attention.Louise O’Regan & Deborah J. Serrien - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  45. Sensorimotor Theory of Consciousness.Jan Degenaar & J. Kevin O’Regan - 2015 - Scholarpedia 10:4952.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46.  10
    The Matrix of Personality.Thomas J. Regan - 1990 - Process Studies 19 (3):189-198.
  47. To See or Not to See: The Need for Attention to Perceive Changes in Scenes.Ronald A. Rensink, J. Kevin O'Regan & James J. Clark - 1997 - Psychological Science 8:368-373.
    When looking at a scene, observers feel that they see its entire structure in great detail and can immediately notice any changes in it. However, when brief blank fields are placed between alternating displays of an original and a modified scene, a striking failure of perception is induced: identification of changes becomes extremely difficult, even when changes are large and made repeatedly. Identification is much faster when a verbal cue is provided, showing that poor visibility is not the cause of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   185 citations  
  48.  38
    Commentary on J.K O’Regan and A Noe: A Sensorimotor Account of Vision and Visual Consciousness.Andy Clark & Josefa Toribio - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):979-980.
    O'Regan and Noe present a wonderfully detailed and comprehensive defense of a position whose broad outline we absolutely and unreservedly endorse. They are right, it seems to us, to stress the intimacy of conscious content and embodied action, and to counter the idea of a Grand Illusion with the image of an agent genuinely in touch, via active exploration, with the rich and varied visual scene. This is an enormously impressive achievement, and we hope that the comments that follow (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  49.  25
    Phenomenal Consciousness Lite: No Thanks!J. Kevin O'Regan & Erik Myin - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5-6):520-521.
    The target article appeals to recent empirical data to support the idea that there is more to phenomenality than is available to access consciousness. However, this claim is based on an unwarranted assumption, namely, that some kind of cortical processing must be phenomenal. The article also considerably weakens Block's original distinction between a truly nonfunctional phenomenal consciousness and a functional access consciousness. The new form of phenomenal consciousness seems to be a poor-man's cognitive access.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50.  33
    Regulating Cult Activities: The Limits of Religious Freedom.Richard J. Regan - 1986 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 61 (2):185-196.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000