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Rekha Nath
University of Alabama
  1.  82
    Relational Egalitarianism.Rekha Nath - 2020 - Philosophy Compass 15 (7):1-12.
    In the past few decades, there has been a growing literature on relational egalitarianism. Relational egalitarianism is a view on the nature and value of equality. In contrast to the dominant view in recent debates on equality—distributive egalitarianism, on which equality is about ensuring people have or fare the same in some respect—on the relational view, equality is a matter of the terms on which relationships are structured. But what exactly does it mean for people to relate as equals? And (...)
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  2. Equal Standing in the Global Community.Rekha Nath - 2011 - The Monist 94 (4):593-614.
    What bearing does living in an increasingly globalized world have upon the moral assessment of global inequality? This paper defends an account of global egalitarianism that differs from standard accounts with respect to both the content of and the justification for the imperative to reduce global inequality. According to standard accounts of global egalitarianism, the global order unjustly allows a person’s relative life prospects to track the morally arbitrary trait of where she happens to be born. After raising some worries (...)
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  3.  78
    The Injustice of Fat Stigma.Rekha Nath - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (5):577-590.
    Fatness stigma is pervasive. Being fat is widely regarded a bad thing, and fat persons suffer numerous social and material disadvantages in virtue of their weight being regarded that way. Despite the seriousness of this problem, it has received relatively little attention from analytic philosophers. In this paper, I set out to explore whether there is a reasoned basis for stigmatizing fatness, and, if so, what forms of stigmatiza‐ tion could be justified. I consider two lines of reasoning that might (...)
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  4. Against Institutional Luck Egalitarianism.Rekha Nath - 2014 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 8 (1):1-19.
    Kok-Chor Tan has recently defended a novel theory of egalitarian distributive justice, institutional luck egalitarianism (ILE). On this theory, it is unjust for institutions to favor some individuals over others based on matters of luck. Tan takes his theory to preserve the intuitive appeal of luck egalitarianism while avoiding what he regards as absurd implications that face other versions of luck egalitarianism. Despite the centrality of the concept of institutional influence to his theory, Tan never spells out precisely what it (...)
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  5.  45
    Individual Responsibility, Large-Scale Harms, and Radical Uncertainty.Rekha Nath - 2021 - The Journal of Ethics 25 (3):267-291.
    Some consequentialists argue that ordinary individuals are obligated to act in specific, concrete ways to address large-scale harms. For example, they argue that we should each refrain from meat-eating and avoid buying sweatshop-made clothing. The case they advance for such prescriptions can seem intuitive and compelling: by acting in those ways, a person might help prevent serious harms from being produced at little or no personal cost, and so one should act in those ways. But I argue that such reasoning (...)
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  6. Two Wrongs Don't Make a Right: A Critique of Virginia Held’s Deontological Justification of Terrorism.Rekha Nath - 2011 - Social Theory and Practice 37 (4):679-696.
    Virginia Held argues that terrorism can be justified in some instances. But unlike standard, consequentialist justifications, hers is deontological. This paper critically examines her argument. It explores how the values of fairness, responsibility, and desert can serve to justify acts of terrorism. In doing so, two interpretations of her account are considered: a responsibility-insensitive and a responsibility-sensitive interpretation. On the first, her argument collapses into a consequentialist justification. On the second, it relies on an implausible conception of responsibility. Either way, (...)
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  7. The Commitments of Cosmopolitanism.Rekha Nath - 2010 - Ethics and International Affairs 24 (3):319-333.
    Gillian Brock's "Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Account" and Darrel Moellendorf's "Global Inequality Matters" present carefully crafted accounts of the obligations we have to non-compatriots and offer practical proposals for how we might get closer to meeting these obligations.
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  8. On the Scope and Grounds of Social Equality.Rekha Nath - 2015 - In Fabian Schuppert and Ivo Wallimann-Helmer Edited by Carina Fourie (ed.), Social Equality: Essays on What It Means to be Equals. Oxford University Press. pp. 186-208.
    On social equality, individuals ought to relate on terms of equality. An important issue concerning this theory, which has not received much attention, is its scope: which individuals ought to relate on egalitarian terms? The answer depends on the theory’s grounds: the basis upon which demands of social equality arise when they do. In this chapter, I consider how we ought to construe the scope and the grounds of social equality. I argue that underlying the considerations social egalitarians advance for (...)
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  9.  10
    Rawls on Global Economic Justice: A Critical Examination.Rekha Nath - 2020 - In Jon Mandle & Sarah Roberts-Cady (eds.), Rawls on global economic justice: a critical examination. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 313-328.
    This chapter canvasses the debate between John Rawls and his cosmopolitan critics over the demands of economic justice that arise beyond state borders. In particular, it examines the merits of four defenses of the position Rawls advances in The Law of Peoples that justice does not call for a cross-society egalitarian distributive principle: first, that such a principle would fail to hold states responsible for their economic position; second, that because societies do not have a fundamental interest in wealth, they (...)
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  10.  90
    Equality for Inegalitarians, by George Sher: Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014, Pp. X + 182, £17.99. [REVIEW]Rekha Nath - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (2):408-411.
    What are society's distributive obligations to its members? The central contribution of this book lies in its novel response to this question. The response is hard to classify. In featuring a largely hands-off government and allowing for significant material inequality, Sher's vision of a just society has a distinctively (right-)libertarian flavour. However, he does not give an historical account of legitimate holdings. Indeed, he embraces a commitment that suggests an allegiance with liberal egalitarians: namely, that a society owes to its (...)
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  11.  96
    Strong Medicine: Creating Incentives for Pharmaceutical Research on Neglected Diseases, Michael Kremer and Rachel Glennerster , 152 Pp., $24.95 Cloth. [REVIEW]Rekha Nath - 2005 - Ethics and International Affairs 19 (3):103-106.
  12.  25
    Waldron, Jeremy. One Another’s Equals: The Basis of Human Equality. Cambridge, MA: Belknap, 2017. Pp. 280. $29.95. [REVIEW]Rekha Nath - 2018 - Ethics 128 (4):840-845.
  13.  58
    Global Institutionalism and Justice.Rekha Nath - 2010 - In Stan van Hooft & Wim Vandekerckhove (eds.), Questioning Cosmopolitanism. Springer. pp. 167-182.
    According to ‘global institutionalism,’ individuals who do not share a state have duties of justice to one another, and this is explained, in part, by the institutional connections that obtain between them. In this chapter, I defend this view against two challenges. First, I consider challenges raised by ‘non-institutionalists,’ who deny that facts about global institutional interaction bear on the nature of duties of justice that arise between particular individuals. Second, I address challenges posed by ‘domestic institutionalists,’ who accept the (...)
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  14.  14
    What is so Special About the State?Rekha Nath - 2010 - In Gabriele de Angelis & Diogo P. Aurelio (eds.), Sovereign Justice: Global Justice in a World of Nations. Walter de Gruyter. pp. 109-128.
    According to 'statism,' the distinctive nature of the state association gives rise to certain demands of distributive justice that exclusively obtain within the state and apply between fellow citizens. This chapter is devoted to critically examining the merits of the statist position. I consider three main strategies that statists employ in defense of their claim about the scope of egalitarian distributive justice—based on, respectively, the relevance of coercion, co-authorship of the state's terms, and the state's provision of basic goods. I (...)
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