Results for 'Recognition'

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  1. Difference'.Recognition Equality - 2006 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 9 (1):23-46.
     
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  2. Recognition and reality.Andrew W. Young - 1994 - In Edmund Michael R. Critchley (ed.), The Neurological Boundaries of Reality. Farrand. pp. 83--100.
     
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  3. Emotion Recognition as a Social Skill.Gen Eickers & Jesse J. Prinz - 2020 - In Ellen Fridland & Carlotta Pavese (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Skill and Expertise. New York, NY: Routledge. pp. 347-361.
    This chapter argues that emotion recognition is a skill. A skill perspective on emotion recognition draws attention to underappreciated features of this cornerstone of social cognition. Skills have a number of characteristic features. For example, they are improvable, practical, and flexible. Emotion recognition has these features as well. Leading theories of emotion recognition often draw inadequate attention to these features. The chapter advances a theory of emotion recognition that is better suited to this purpose. It (...)
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  4.  50
    Recognition and the perception–cognition divide.Greyson Abid - 2021 - Mind and Language 37 (5):770-789.
    Recent discussions have fixated on the distinction between perception and cognition. How should recognition be understood in light of this distinction? The relevant sense of recognition involves a sensitivity to particulars from one's past. Recognizing the face of a familiar friend is one instance of this phenomenon, as is recognizing an object or place that one has viewed before. In this article, I argue that recognition is an interface capacity that straddles the border between perception and cognition.
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  5. Recognition and Power: Axel Honneth and the Tradition of Critical Social Theory.Bert van den Brink & David Owen (eds.) - 2007 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    The topic of recognition has come to occupy a central place in debates in social and political theory. Developed by George Herbert Mead and Charles Taylor, it has been given expression in the program for Critical Theory developed by Axel Honneth in his book The Struggle for Recognition. Honneth's research program offers an empirically insightful way of reflecting on emancipatory struggles for greater justice and a powerful theoretical tool for generating a conception of justice and the good that (...)
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  6.  9
    Face Recognition Depends on Specialized Mechanisms Tuned to View‐Invariant Facial Features: Insights from Deep Neural Networks Optimized for Face or Object Recognition.Naphtali Abudarham, Idan Grosbard & Galit Yovel - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (9):e13031.
    Face recognition is a computationally challenging classification task. Deep convolutional neural networks (DCNNs) are brain‐inspired algorithms that have recently reached human‐level performance in face and object recognition. However, it is not clear to what extent DCNNs generate a human‐like representation of face identity. We have recently revealed a subset of facial features that are used by humans for face recognition. This enables us now to ask whether DCNNs rely on the same facial information and whether this human‐like (...)
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  7.  11
    Recognition.Cillian McBride - 2013 - Malden, MA, USA: Polity Press.
    Everyone cares about recognition: no one wants to be treated with disrespect, insulted, humiliated, or simply ignored. In this compelling new book, McBride examines how a basic need for recognition is the motivation behind struggles for inclusion and equality in contemporary society.
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  8. Mutual Recognition and Well-Being: What Is It for Relational Selves to Thrive?Arto Laitinen - forthcoming - In Onni Hirvonen & Heikki J. Koskinen (eds.), Theory and Practice of Recognition. New York, London: pp. ch 3..
    This paper argues that relations of mutual recognition (love, respect, esteem, trust) contribute directly and non-reductively to our flourishing as relational selves. -/- Love is important for the quality of human life. Not only do everyday experiences and analyses of pop culture and world literature attest to this; scientific research does as well. How exactly does love contribute to well-being? This chapter discusses the suggestion that it not only matters for the experiential quality of life, or for successful agency, (...)
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  9.  79
    Tragedy, Recognition, and the Death of God: Studies in Hegel and Nietzsche.Robert R. Williams - 2012 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    Robert R. Williams offers a bold new account of divergences and convergences in the work of Hegel and Nietzsche. He explores four themes - the philosophy of tragedy; recognition and community; critique of Kant; and the death of God - and explicates both thinkers' critiques of traditional theology and metaphysics.
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  10. Globalizing Recognition. Global Justice and the Dialectic of Recognition.Gottfried Schweiger - 2012 - Public Reason 4 (1-2):78-91.
    The question I want to answer is if and how the recognition approach, taken from the works of Axel Honneth, could be an adequate framework for addressing the problems of global justice and poverty. My thesis is that such a globalization of the recognition approach rests on the dialectic of relative and absolute elements of recognition. (1) First, I will discuss the relativism of the recognition approach, that it understands recognition as being relative to a (...)
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  11.  32
    Recognition theory and contemporary French moral and political philosophy: reopening the dialogue.Miriam Bankovsky & Alice Le Goff (eds.) - 2012 - New York: distributed exclusively in the USA by Palgrave Macmillan.
    The revival of recognition theory has brought new energy to critical theory. In general terms, recognition theory aims to critically evaluate social structures against a standard of social freedom identified with norms of interaction which are freely recognized by all parties. Until now, attention has primarily focused on the categories and forms of recognition theory. However, the influence of contemporary French theory upon the development of theories of recognition has not yet received the consideration it merits. (...)
  12. Recognition and Social Exclusion. A recognition-theoretical Exploration of Poverty in Europe.Gottfried Schweiger - 2013 - Ethical Perspectives 20 (4):529-554.
    Thus far, the recognition approach as described in the works of Axel Honneth has not systematically engaged with the problem of poverty. To fill this gap, the present contribution will focus on poverty conceived as social exclusion in the context of the European Union and probe its moral significance. It will show that this form of social exclusion is morally harmful and wrong from the perspective of the recognition approach. To justify this finding, social exclusion has to fulfil (...)
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  13.  89
    Perceptual recognition as a function of meaningfulness of stimulus material.Gerald M. Reicher - 1969 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (2):275.
  14. Mutual Recognition in Human-Robot Interaction: a Deflationary Account.Ingar Brinck & Christian Balkenius - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (1):53-70.
    Mutually adaptive interaction involves the robot as a partner as opposed to a tool, and requires that the robot is susceptible to similar environmental cues and behavior patterns as humans are. Recognition, or the acknowledgement of the other as individual, is fundamental to mutually adaptive interaction between humans. We discuss what recognition involves and its behavioral manifestations, and describe the benefits of implementing it in HRI.
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  15.  56
    Freedom, recognition and non-domination: a republican theory of (global) justice.Fabian Schuppert (ed.) - 2014 - New York: Springer.
    This book offers an original account of a distinctly republican theory of social and global justice. The book starts by exploring the nature and value of Hegelian recognition theory. It shows the importance of that theory for grounding a normative account of free and autonomous agency. It is this normative account of free agency which provides the groundwork for a republican conception of social and global justice, based on the core-ideas of freedom as non-domination and autonomy as non-alienation. As (...)
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  16.  91
    Recognition: Fichte and Hegel on the Other.Robert R. Williams - 1992 - State University of New York Press.
    Investigates the concept of recognition (anerkennen) under which term the German idealists discussed the Other, intersubjectivity, the interhuman.
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  17. Face recognition with and without awareness.Andrew W. Young - 2003 - In Axel Cleeremans (ed.), The Unity of Consciousness: Binding, Integration, and Dissociation. Oxford University Press.
  18.  9
    Recognition Theory as Social Research: Investigating the Dynamics of Social Conflict.Nicholas H. Smith & Shane O'Neill (eds.) - 2012 - Palgrave MacMillan.
    This edited collection presents the case for a research program (in Lakatos's sense) in the social sciences based on the theory of recognition developed by Axel Honneth and others in recent years. The cumulative argument of the book is that recognition theory provides both a plausible framework for explaining social conflict and a normative compass for reaching just resolutions.
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  19. Recognition, Vulnerability and Trust.Danielle Petherbridge - 2021 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 29 (1):1-23.
    ABSTRACT This paper examines the question of whether recognition relations are based on trust. Theorists of recognition have acknowledged the ways in which recognition relations make us vulnerable to others but have largely neglected the underlying ‘webs of trust’ in which such relations are embedded. In this paper, I consider the ways in which the theories of recognition developed by Jürgen Habermas and Axel Honneth, not only point to our mutual vulnerability but also implicitly rely upon (...)
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  20.  30
    Capabilities, Recognition and the Philosophical Evaluation of Poverty: A Discussion of Issues of Justification and the Role of subjective Experiences.Gunter Graf & Gottfried Schweiger - 2013 - International Critical Thought 3 (3):282--296.
    Both the capability and the recognition approach are influential and substantial theories in social philosophy. In this contribution, we outline their main assumptions in their assessment of poverty. The two approaches are set in relation to each other, focusing mainly on (a) their moral evaluation of poverty, (b) issues of justification of their central normative claims, and (c) the role that is attributed to subjective experiences, feelings and emotions in these theories. This comparison reveals that in spite of significant (...)
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  21. The Displacement of Recognition by Coercion in Fichte's Grundlage des Naturrechts'.Robert R. Williams - 2002 - In Daniel Breazeale & Tom Rockmore (eds.), New essays on Fichte's later Jena Wissenschaftslehre. Evanston, Ill.: Northwestern University Press.
     
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  22. Reciprocal Recognition and Epistemic Virtue.Celia Edell - 2019 - Ithaque 25:1-21.
    Using the concepts of epistemic virtue and vice as defined by José Medina, and reciprocal recognition as outlined by Glen Coulthard, I argue that the Canadian state is currently in a non-reciprocal relationship with Indigenous peoples as a result of epistemic failure on the part of the state. This failure involves a surfacelevel recognition of Indigenous peoples at the same time as the manifestation of the epistemic vices of arrogance, laziness and closed-mindedness. The epistemic injustice framework alongside a (...)
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  23.  30
    Recognition Beyond French-German Divides: Engaging Axel Honneth.Miriam Bankovsky & Danielle Petherbridge - 2021 - Critical Horizons 22 (1):1-4.
    ABSTRACT What does it mean to practice a theory of recognition within the discipline of philosophy? Across an initially acrimonious French-German divide, Axel Honneth’s effort to recognise the value of contemporary French philosophy and social theory suggests that philosophy is a self-critical, outwardly oriented, and cooperative discipline. First, mobilising the idea of recognition in his own philosophical practise has permitted Honneth to notice non-deliberative aspects of social interaction that Habermas had overlooked, including the need for self-confidence and the (...)
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  24. Perceptual-recognitional abilities and perceptual knowledge.Alan Millar - 2008 - In Adrian Haddock & Fiona Macpherson (eds.), Disjunctivism: perception, action, knowledge. Oxford University Press. pp. 330--47.
    A conception of recognitional abilities and perceptual-discriminative abilities is deployed to make sense of how perceptual experiences enable us to make cognitive contact with objects and facts. It is argued that accepting the emerging view does not commit us to thinking that perceptual experiences are essentially relational, as they are conceived to be in disjunctivist theories. The discussion explores some implications for the theory of knowledge in general and, in particular, for the issue of how we can shed light on (...)
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  25.  9
    Recognition and Religion: A Historical and Systematic Study.Risto Saarinen - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Recognition and Religion: A Historical and Systematic Study outlines the first intellectual history of religious recognition, stretching from the New Testament to present day. Risto Saarinen connects the history of religion with philosophical approaches, arguing that philosophers owe a considerable historical and conceptual debt to the religious processes of recognition. At the same time, religious recognition has a distinctive profile that differs from philosophy in some important respects. Saarinen undertakes a systematic elaboration of the insights provided (...)
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  26. Recognition and Social Ontology.Heikki Ikaheimo & Arto Laitinen (eds.) - 2011 - Leiden: Brill.
    This unique collection examines the connections between two complementary approaches to philosophical social theory: Hegel-inspired theories of recognition, and analytical social ontology.
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  27. Emotion Recognition as Pattern Recognition: The Relevance of Perception.Albert Newen, Anna Welpinghus & Georg Juckel - 2015 - Mind and Language 30 (2):187-208.
    We develop a version of a direct perception account of emotion recognition on the basis of a metaphysical claim that emotions are individuated as patterns of characteristic features. On our account, emotion recognition relies on the same type of pattern recognition as is described for object recognition. The analogy allows us to distinguish two forms of directly perceiving emotions, namely perceiving an emotion in the absence of any top-down processes, and perceiving an emotion in a way (...)
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  28.  37
    Recognition, Acknowledgement, and Acceptance.Arto Laitinen - 2011 - In Heikki Ikaheimo & Arto Laitinen (eds.), Recognition and Social Ontology. Leiden: Brill. pp. 309-347.
    In this chapter I distinguish between a) recognition of persons, b) normative acknowledgement and c) institution-creating acceptance. All of these go beyond a fourth, merely descriptive sense of the word “recognition,” namely identification or re-identification of something as something. I distinguish four aspects of "taking someone as a person": R1 A Belief that the other is a person, and can engage in agency-regarding relations.R2 Moral Opinion that the choice whether and when to engage with persons is ethically significant.R3 (...)
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  29.  45
    Recognition Across French-German Divides: The Social Fabric of Freedom in French Theory.Axel Honneth & Miriam Bankovsky - 2021 - Critical Horizons 22 (1):5-28.
    In his recent book, Recognition: A Chapter in the History of European ideas (2021), Honneth has explained how he understands the French concept of recognition. This article places Honneth's latest interpretation in the context of his long-standing and evolving engagement with French theory over several decades. Honneth acknowledges his significant debt to a French tendency to view recognition as a problem for self-realisation (and not an opportunity). Bourdieu's and Boltanski's account of how ambitions become limited by the (...)
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  30.  53
    Recognition memory for nouns as a function of abstractness and frequency.Aloysia M. Gorman - 1961 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 61 (1):23.
  31.  26
    Recognition memory of neutral words can be impaired by task-irrelevant emotional encoding contexts: behavioral and electrophysiological evidence.Qin Zhang, Xuan Liu, Wei An, Yang Yang & Yinan Wang - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9:123638.
    Previous studies on the effects of emotional context on memory for centrally presented neutral items have obtained inconsistent results. And in most of those studies subjects were asked to either make a connection between the item and the context at study or retrieve both the item and the context. When no response for the contexts is required, how emotional contexts influence memory for neutral items is still unclear. Thus, the present study attempted to investigate the influences of four types of (...)
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  32. Recognition and Social Ontology: An Introduction.Heikki Ikäheimo & Arto Laitinen - 2011 - In Heikki Ikaheimo & Arto Laitinen (eds.), Recognition and Social Ontology. Leiden: Brill. pp. 1-24.
    A substantial article length introduction to a collection on social ontology and mutual recognition.
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  33. Recognition rights, mental health consumers and reconstructive cultural semantics.Jennifer H. Radden - 2012 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7:1-8.
    IntroductionThose in mental health-related consumer movements have made clear their demands for humane treatment and basic civil rights, an end to stigma and discrimination, and a chance to participate in their own recovery. But theorizing about the politics of recognition, 'recognition rights' and epistemic justice, suggests that they also have a stake in the broad cultural meanings associated with conceptions of mental health and illness.ResultsFirst person accounts of psychiatric diagnosis and mental health care (shown here to represent 'counter (...)
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  34. Recognition and Feminist Thought.Kristina Lepold - 2018 - Handbuch Anerkennung.
    In this article, we give an overview over both past and present as well as possible future debates around recognition in and in connection with feminist thought. In principle, recognition can involve persons, collectives, and institutions, but here we are primarily concerned with the recognition of persons by other persons. In the first section, we start with a discussion of care as a form of recognition and the recognition of care work. In the second section, (...)
     
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  35. Machine Learning and Irresponsible Inference: Morally Assessing the Training Data for Image Recognition Systems.Owen C. King - 2019 - In Matteo Vincenzo D'Alfonso & Don Berkich (eds.), On the Cognitive, Ethical, and Scientific Dimensions of Artificial Intelligence. Springer Verlag. pp. 265-282.
    Just as humans can draw conclusions responsibly or irresponsibly, so too can computers. Machine learning systems that have been trained on data sets that include irresponsible judgments are likely to yield irresponsible predictions as outputs. In this paper I focus on a particular kind of inference a computer system might make: identification of the intentions with which a person acted on the basis of photographic evidence. Such inferences are liable to be morally objectionable, because of a way in which they (...)
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  36.  12
    Recognition of English speech – using a deep learning algorithm.Shuyan Wang - 2023 - Journal of Intelligent Systems 32 (1).
    The accurate recognition of speech is beneficial to the fields of machine translation and intelligent human–computer interaction. After briefly introducing speech recognition algorithms, this study proposed to recognize speech with a recurrent neural network (RNN) and adopted the connectionist temporal classification (CTC) algorithm to align input speech sequences and output text sequences forcibly. Simulation experiments compared the RNN-CTC algorithm with the Gaussian mixture model–hidden Markov model and convolutional neural network-CTC algorithms. The results demonstrated that the more training samples (...)
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  37. Recognition in Feuerbach.Jean-Philippe Deranty - 2019 - Handbuch Recognition.
    Ludwig Feuerbach is famous for his critical hermeneutics of religion. At the heart of it lie arguments of philosophical anthropology that directly anticipate contemporary developments in the theory of recognition. He counts amongst the great philosophers who, immediately following Kant, emphasised the constitutive importance for human beings of interpersonal and social relations. Indeed, his theory of intersubjectivity contains features that are highly original, notably the link between individual and community, and between recognition and recollection.
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  38. Recognition and Ambivalence: Judith Butler, Axel Honneth, and Beyond.Heikki Ikäheimo, Kristina Lepold & Titus Stahl (eds.) - 2021 - New York: Columbia University Press.
    Recognition is one of the most debated concepts in contemporary social and political thought. Its proponents, such as Axel Honneth, hold that to be recognized by others is a basic human need that is central to forming an identity, and the denial of recognition deprives individuals and communities of something essential for their flourishing. Yet critics including Judith Butler have questioned whether recognition is implicated in structures of domination, arguing that the desire to be recognized can motivative (...)
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  39.  33
    Recognition: A Chapter in the History of European Ideas.Axel Honneth - 2020 - New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
    The idea that we are mutually dependent on the recognition of our peers is at least as old as modernity. Across Europe, this idea has been understood in different ways from the very beginning, according to each country's different cultural and political conditions. This stimulating study explores the complex history and multiple associations of the idea of 'Recognition' in Britain, France and Germany. Demonstrating the role of 'recognition' in the production of important political ideas, Axel Honneth explores (...)
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  40.  30
    Communal recognition and human flourishing: a Kierkegaardian account.Dylan S. Bailey - 2022 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 83 (1):64-78.
    Recent debates over the role of recognition by the community for one’s development and flourishing generally discuss community in a univocal sense: the way that recognition functions in particular communities is not fundamentally different from the way it functions in the larger community. They also tend to logically prioritize a fundamental human identity over particular religious, ethnic, or societal identities, which are understood to be secondary to, and derivative of, this basic identity. In his depiction of how communal (...)
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  41. Analyzing Recognition: Identification, Acknowledgement and Recognitive Attitudes Towards Persons.Heikki Ikäheimo & Arto Laitinen - 2007 - In Bert van den Brink & David Owen (eds.), Recognition and Power. Cambridge University Press. pp. 33-56.
    There is today a wide consensus that ‘recognition’ is something that we need a clear grasp of in order to understand the dynamics of political struggles, and, perhaps the constitution and dynamics of social reality more generally. Yet, the discussions on ‘recognition’ have so far often been conceptually rather inexplicit, in the sense that the very key concepts have remained largely unexplicated or undefined. Since the English word ‘recognition’ is far from unambiguous, it is possible, and to (...)
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  42.  56
    CAPTCHA Recognition Method Based on CNN with Focal Loss.Zhong Wang & Peibei Shi - 2021 - Complexity 2021:1-10.
    In order to distinguish between computers and humans, CAPTCHA is widely used in links such as website login and registration. The traditional CAPTCHA recognition method has poor recognition ability and robustness to different types of verification codes. For this reason, the paper proposes a CAPTCHA recognition method based on convolutional neural network with focal loss function. This method improves the traditional VGG network structure and introduces the focal loss function to generate a new CAPTCHA recognition model. (...)
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  43.  76
    The Struggle for Recognition: The Moral Grammar of Social Conflicts.Axel Honneth - 1996 - MIT Press.
    In this pathbreaking study, Axel Honneth argues that "the struggle for recognition" is, and should be, at the center of social conflicts. Moving smoothly between moral philosophy and social theory, Honneth offers insights into such issues as the social forms of recognition and nonrecognition, the moral basis of interaction in human conflicts, the relation between the recognition model and conceptions of modernity, the normative basis of social theory, and the possibility of mediating between Hegel and Kant.
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  44. Recognition and social freedom.Paddy McQueen - 2022 - European Journal of Political Theory (1).
    In this article I describe and defend an account of social freedom grounded in intersubjective recognition. I term this the ‘normative authorisation’ account. It holds that a person enjoys social freedom if she is recognised as a discursive equal able to engage in justificatory dialogue with other social agents about the appropriateness of her reasons for action. I contrast this with Axel Honneth’s theory of social freedom, which I term the ‘self-realisation’ account. According to this view, the affirmative (...) of others is necessary for obtaining a positive relation-to-self and hence freedom. I identify several problems with this account, which challenge the connection Honneth draws between social recognition and freedom. I show how the normative authorisation account avoids these problems and captures some basic features of our everyday, normative interactions. Finally, I suggest that the account fits well with recent work on epistemic injustice. Specifically, it shows that securing the social conditions of freedom requires ensuring epistemically-just social relations. Thus, the normative authorisation account is an explanatorily powerful, inclusive theory of social freedom that fits well with wider accounts of justice and freedom. Thus, it represents the most promising way of understanding social freedom in terms of interpersonal recognition. (shrink)
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  45.  21
    Migration, Recognition and Critical Theory.Gottfried Schweiger (ed.) - 2021 - Springer Verlag.
    This book brings together philosophical, social-theoretical and empirically oriented contributions on the philosophical and socio-theoretical debate on migration and integration, using the instruments of recognition as a normative and social-scientific category. Furthermore, the theoretical and practical implications of recognition theory are reflected through the case of migration. Migration movements, refugees and the associated tensions are phenomena that have become the focus of scientific, political and public debate in recent years. Migrants, in particular refugees, face many injustices and are (...)
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  46.  37
    Word recognition and morphemic structure.Graham A. Murrell & John Morton - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (6):963.
  47. Recognition, a study in the philosophy of artificial intelligence.Kenneth M. Sayre - 1965 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 22 (4):497-497.
     
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  48.  24
    Recognition and Redistribution.Jacinda Swanson - 2005 - Theory, Culture and Society 22 (4):87-118.
    Nancy Fraser has elaborated a framework for analyzing different forms of oppression using the categories of redistribution and recognition. This framework has come under criticism from Iris Marion Young and Judith Butler, despite the fact that all three theorists similarly insist that justice is not reducible solely to economic justice and that struggles against ‘cultural’ forms of oppression are equally important. Drawing on the debate between these theorists, in this article I examine the ways in which their respective theoretical (...)
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  49.  52
    Witnessing: Beyond Recognition.Kelly Oliver - 2001 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
    Challenging the fundamental tenet of the multicultural movement -- that social struggles turning upon race, gender, and sexuality are struggles for recognition -- this work offers a powerful critique of current conceptions of identity and ...
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  50. Recognition of struggle: Transcending the oppressive dynamics of desire.Magnus Hörnqvist - forthcoming - Constellations.
    The objective of this article is to see whether desire for recognition might contain an emancipatory aspect. Could this desire be a political ally? The argumentative strategy is to fully acknowledge the oppressive mechanisms at work before trying to find a way to other outcomes, including emancipation, with which desire for recognition has been associated in the tradition from Hegel. Through a re-interpretation of the master-and-slave dialectic, supplemented by sociological research on status expectations, I suggest a way out (...)
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