Results for 'Rebekah Nahai'

174 found
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  1.  12
    Higher education in a state of crisis: a perspective from a Students' Quality Circle. [REVIEW]Rebekah Nahai & Sophie Österberg - 2012 - AI and Society 27 (3):387-398.
    This article introduces a Students’ Quality Circle in higher education, in the context of current debates. With increasing numbers of students entering the university and constrained financial resources in the sector, new approaches are needed, with new partnership between lecturers and students. The first Students’ Quality Circle at Kingston is located in a wider international context.
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  2.  11
    An Emotional Call to Action: Integrating Affective Neuroscience in Models of Motor Control.Rebekah L. Blakemore & Patrik Vuilleumier - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (4):299-309.
    Intimate relationships between emotion and action have long been acknowledged, yet contemporary theories and experimental research within affective and movement neuroscience have not been linked into a coherent framework bridging these two fields. Accumulating psychological and neuroimaging evidence has, however, brought new insights regarding how emotions affect the preparation, execution, and control of voluntary movement. Here we review main approaches and findings on such emotion–action interactions. To assimilate key emotion concepts of action tendencies and motive states with fundamental constructs of (...)
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  3.  2
    Science and Sociability: Women as Audience at the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1831–1901.Rebekah Higgitt & Charles Withers - 2008 - Isis 99:1-27.
  4. Aristotle on Wittiness.Rebekah Johnston - 2020 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (2):323-336.
    Aristotle claims, in his Nicomachean Ethics, that in addition to being, for example, just and courageous, and temperate, the virtuous person will also be witty. Very little sustained attention, however, has been devoted to explicating what Aristotle means when he claims that virtuous persons are witty or to justifying the plausibility of the claim that wittiness is a virtue. It becomes especially difficult to see why Aristotle thinks that being witty is a virtue once it becomes clear that Aristotle’s witty (...)
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  5.  11
    The Anatomy of a Philosophical Hoax.Rebekah Spera & David M. Peña-Guzmán - 2019 - Metaphilosophy 50 (1-2):156-174.
    This article reflects upon the state of the philosophical profession vis‐à‐vis a close reading of the hoax perpetrated against the International Journal of Badiou Studies in 2016. This hoax is not a subversive act of disciplinary criticism (as the hoaxers contend). Rather, it is a poorly disguised attempt to enforce a partisan and myopic conception of philosophy and to delegitimize an entire subfield of philosophical production—namely, continental philosophy. The hoax is symptomatic of a deeper problem that plagues the profession today: (...)
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  6. Dred: how kinging and illusion queer the audience.Rebekah Delaney - 2013 - In Kathleen O'Mara & Liz Morrish (eds.), Queering paradigms III: queer impact and practices. Bern, Switzerland: Peter Lang.
  7.  4
    Nietzsche for the 21st century and beyond.Rebekah S. Peery - 2010 - New York: Algora.
    This book concentrates on Nietzsche's major legacy as a philosopher.
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  8.  22
    Tactile expectations and the perception of self-touch: An investigation using the rubber hand paradigm.Rebekah C. White, Anne M. Aimola Davies, Terri J. Halleen & Martin Davies - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (2):505-519.
    The rubber hand paradigm is used to create the illusion of self-touch, by having the participant administer stimulation to a prosthetic hand while the Examiner, with an identical stimulus , administers stimulation to the participant’s hand. With synchronous stimulation, participants experience the compelling illusion that they are touching their own hand. In the current study, the robustness of this illusion was assessed using incongruent stimuli. The participant used the index finger of the right hand to administer stimulation to a prosthetic (...)
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  9.  18
    Dualism Revisited: Body vs. Mind vs. Soul.Rebekah Richert & Paul Harris - 2008 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 8 (1-2):99-115.
    A large, diverse sample of adults was interviewed about their conception of the ontological and functional properties of the mind as compared to the soul. The existence of the mind was generally tied to the human lifecycle of conception, birth, growth and death, and was primarily associated with cognitive as opposed to spiritual functions. In contrast, the existence of the soul was less systematically tied to the lifecycle and frequently associated with spiritual as opposed to cognitive functions. Participants were also (...)
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  10. Reasons and Divine Action: A Dilemma.Rebekah L. H. Rice - 2016 - In Kevin Timpe Dan Speak (ed.), Free Will and Theism: Connections, Contingencies, and Concerns. Oxford University Press.
    Many theistic philosophers conceive of God’s activity in agent-causal terms. That is, they view divine action as an instance of (perhaps the paradigm case of) substance causation. At the same time, many theists endorse the claim that God acts for reasons, and not merely wantonly. It is the aim of this paper to show that a commitment to both theses gives rise to a dilemma. I present the dilemma and then spend the bulk of the paper defending its premises. I (...)
     
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  11.  14
    The Ghost in My Body: Children's Developing Concept of the Soul.Rebekah Richert & Paul Harris - 2006 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 6 (3-4):409-427.
    Two experiments were conducted to explore whether children, who have been exposed to the concept of the soul, differentiate the soul from the mind. In the first experiment, 4- to 12-year-old children were asked about whether a religious ritual affects the mind, the brain, or the soul. The majority of the children claimed that only the soul was different after baptism. In a follow-up study, 6- to 12-year-old children were tested more explicitly on what factors differentiate the soul from the (...)
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  12.  7
    Two hands are better than one: A new assessment method and a new interpretation of the non-visual illusion of self-touch.Rebekah C. White, Anne M. Aimola Davies & Martin Davies - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):956-964.
    A simple experimental paradigm creates the powerful illusion that one is touching one’s own hand even when the two hands are separated by 15 cm. The participant uses her right hand to administer stimulation to a prosthetic hand while the Examiner provides identical stimulation to the participant’s receptive left hand. Change in felt position of the receptive hand toward the prosthetic hand has previously led to the interpretation that the participant experiences self-touch at the location of the prosthetic hand, and (...)
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  13.  15
    Dignity and Its Violation Examined within the Context of Animal Ethics.Rebekah Humphreys - 2016 - Ethics and the Environment 21 (2):143-162.
    The word ‘dignity’ may be used in a presentational sense, for example, one might say “she presents herself with dignity”, or in a social sense, for example, one might say “she fulfilled her duty with dignity, or honour.” However, in this paper I will not be using ‘dignity’ in either of these senses. Rather, the sense of dignity I will be concerned with is one that is related to ideas about the value or worth of a being. This latter sense (...)
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  14.  4
    Maintaining Research Integrity While Balancing Cultural Sensitivity: A Case Study and Lessons From the Field.Rebekah Sibbald, Bethina Loiseau, Benedict Darren, Salem A. Raman, Helen Dimaras & Lawrence C. Loh - 2015 - Developing World Bioethics 16 (1):55-60.
    Contemporary emphasis on creating culturally relevant and context specific knowledge increasingly drives researchers to conduct their work in settings outside their home country. This often requires researchers to build relationships with various stakeholders who may have a vested interest in the research. This case study examines the tension between relationship development with stakeholders and maintaining study integrity, in the context of potential harms, data credibility and cultural sensitivity. We describe an ethical breach in the conduct of global health research by (...)
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  15.  8
    Personal Autonomy, Social Identity, and Oppressive Social Contexts.Rebekah Johnston - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (2):312-328.
    Attempts to articulate the ways in which membership in socially subordinated social identities can impede one's autonomy have largely unfolded as part of the debate between different types of internalist theories in relation to the problem of internalized oppression. The different internalist positions, however, employ a damage model for understanding the role of social subordination in limiting autonomy. I argue that we need an externalist condition in order to capture the ways in which membership in a socially subordinated identity can (...)
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  16.  11
    Ethics, zoonoses, and human-nonhuman conflict: Covid-19 and beyond.Rebekah Humphreys, Rhyddhi Chakraborty & Nithin Varghese - 2022 - Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 22:69-74.
    While the causes of human-animal conflict are numerous, many are intertwined with food production systems and the wildlife trade. The emergence and spread of Covid-19 exemplify this. Indeed, the wildlife population in South Asian countries has seen an increase in the risk of both human and nonhuman death in recent months, and as the economy slows, the search for food and extra income will intensify, negatively impacting wildlife. This paper aims to address some of the ethical issues concerning our treatment (...)
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  17.  33
    Exploding Individuals: Engaging Indigenous Logic and Decolonizing Science.Rebekah Sinclair - 2020 - Hypatia 35 (1):58-74.
    Despite emerging attention to Indigenous philosophies both within and outside of feminism, Indigenous logics remain relatively underexplored and underappreciated. By amplifying the voices of recent Indigenous philosophies and literatures, I seek to demonstrate that Indigenous logic is a crucial aspect of Indigenous resurgence as well as political and ethical resistance. Indigenous philosophies provide alternatives to the colonial, masculinist tendencies of classical logic in the form of paraconsistent—many-valued—logics. Specifically, when Indigenous logics embrace the possibility of true contradictions, they highlight aspects of (...)
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  18.  10
    A ‘Game’ Bird? On Why Hunting is Not a Game and Thus Not a Sport.Rebekah Humphreys - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 17 (4):432-442.
    This paper aims to provide a conceptual analysis of blood-sport as a concept. Through utilising a generalised notion of sport as well as the concept of fair-play, the objective will be to examine whether blood-sports are games and analyse to what extent, if any, blood-sports can be properly called ‘sports’. For the purposes of application and because of the sheer numbers of birds used in the sports-shooting industry, the paper will focus on a discussion of game-birding, but the findings will (...)
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  19. Materials in tension : assemblage and the art of revelation.Rebekah Pryor - 2024 - In Samer Akkach, John Powell & Jeff Malpas (eds.), Numinous fields: perceiving the sacred in nature, landscape, and art. Boston: Brill.
     
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  20.  17
    Death and Persistence.Rebekah L. H. Rice - 2022 - Cambridge:: Cambridge University Press.
    The idea that physical death may not mark the end of an individual's existence has long been a source of fascination. It is perhaps unsurprising that we are apt to wonder what it is that happens to us when we die. Is death the end of me and all the experiences that count as mine? Or might I exist, and indeed have experiences, beyond the time of my death? And yet, deep metaphysical puzzles arise at the very suggestion that persons (...)
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  21. Divine simplicity.Rebekah L. H. Rice - 2022 - In Mark A. Lamport (ed.), The Rowman & Littlefield Handbook of Philosophy and Religion. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
  22.  10
    Community Engagement and the Protection-Inclusion Dilemma.Rebekah McWhirter, Azure Hermes, Sharon Huebner & Alex Brown - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (6):100-102.
    In articulating the protection-inclusion dilemma, Friesen et al. (2023) identify an important issue facing institutional review boards (IRBs) and elucidate historical factors contributing to its de...
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  23.  7
    Belief as a non-epistemic adaptive benefit.Rebekah Gelpi, William Andrew Cunningham & Daphna Buchsbaum - 2020 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 43.
    Although rationalization about one's own beliefs and actions can improve an individual's future decisions, beliefs can provide other benefits unrelated to their epistemic truth value, such as group cohesion and identity. A model of resource-rational cognition that accounts for these benefits may explain unexpected and seemingly irrational thought patterns, such as belief polarization.
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  24.  15
    Special issue: approaches to faith: Guest editorial preface.Rebekah L. H. Rice, Daniel McKaughan & Daniel Howard-Snyder - 2017 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 81 (1-2):1-6.
    According to many accounts of faith—where faith is thought of as something psychological, e.g., an attitude, state, or trait—one cannot have faith without belief of the relevant propositions. According to other accounts of faith, one can have faith without belief of the relevant propositions. Call the first sort of account doxasticism since it insists that faith requires belief; call the second nondoxasticism since it allows faith without belief. The New Testament may seem to favor doxasticism over nondoxasticism. For it may (...)
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  25.  7
    Author Reply: Emotion in Action – From Theories and Boxologies to Brain Circuits.Rebekah L. Blakemore & Patrik Vuilleumier - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (4):356-357.
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  26.  6
    Challenging Tropes: Genius, Heroic Invention, and the Longitude Problem in the Museum.Rebekah Higgitt - 2017 - Isis 108 (2):371-380.
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  27.  18
    Inattentional blindness on the full-attention trial: Are we throwing out the baby with the bathwater?Rebekah C. White, Martin Davies & Anne M. Aimola Davies - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 59:64-77.
  28.  10
    A/parecernos: Rethinking the Multiplicitous Self as “Haunted” with Anzaldúa, La Malinche, and Other Ghosts.Rebekah Sinclair & Margaret Newton - 2021 - The Pluralist 16 (1):49-57.
    Unlike many theories of the self found in Western philosophy, Maria Lugones and Mariana Ortega argue that subjectivity is multiplicitous in ways that defy the either/or logic of colonial Western thought. They also center liminal subjects, take embodiment seriously, and position multiplicitous subjects as always already in the borderlands. Their accounts of multiplicity are grounded in their lived experiences. Nevertheless, Lugones and Ortega disagree on the ontological and existential statuses of the multiplicitous self. While Lugones defends ontological pluralism and the (...)
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  29.  24
    Omnia Vincit Amor.Rebekah Compton - 2012 - Mediaevalia 33 (33):229-260.
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  30. The Pastor as Moral Guide.Rebekah L. Miles - 1999
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  31. Agent Causation and Acting for Reasons.Rebekah L. H. Rice - 2011 - American Philosophical Quarterly 48 (4):333-346.
    The Agent-Causal Theory of Action claims that an event counts as an action when, and only when, it is caused by an agent. The central difference between the Causal Theory of Action (CTA) and the Agent-Causal view comes down to a disagreement about what sort of item (or items) occupies the left-hand position in the causal relation. For CTA, the left-hand position is occupied by mental items within the agent, typically construed in terms of mental events (e.g., belief/desire pairs or (...)
     
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  32.  15
    What is a Causal Theorist to Do about Omissions?Rebekah L. H. Rice - 2011 - Modern Schoolman 88 (1-2):123-144.
    Most philosophers concede that one can properly be held morally responsible for intentionally omitting to do something. If one maintains that omissions are actions (negative actions, perhaps), then assuming the requisite conditions regarding voluntariness are met, one can tell a familiar story about how/why this is. In particular, causal theorists can explain the etiology of an intentional omission in causal terms. However, if one denies that omissions are actions of any kind, then the familiar story is no longer available. Some (...)
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  33.  2
    ‘Greenwich near London’: the Royal Observatory and its London networks in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.Rebekah Higgitt - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Science 52 (2):297-322.
    Built in Greenwich in 1675–1676, the Royal Observatory was situated outside the capital but was deeply enmeshed within its knowledge networks and communities of practice. Scholars have tended to focus on the links cultivated by the Astronomers Royal within scholarly communities in England and Europe but the observatory was also deeply reliant on and engaged with London's institutions and practical mathematical community. It was a royal foundation, situated within one government board, taking a leading role on another, and overseen by (...)
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  34.  7
    “It's Like a Family”: Caring Labor, Exploitation, and Race in Nursing Homes.Rebekah M. Zincavage & Lisa Dodson - 2007 - Gender and Society 21 (6):905-928.
    This article contributes to carework scholarship by examining the nexus of gender, class, and race in long-term care facilities. We draw out a family ideology at work that promotes good care of residents and thus benefits nursing homes. We also found that careworkers value fictive kin relationships with residents, yet we uncover how the family model may be used to exploit these low-income careworkers. Reflecting a subordinate and racialized version of being “part of the family,” we call for an ethic (...)
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  35.  5
    The Sermon on the Mount and Moral Theology: A Virtue Perspective by William C. Mattison III.Rebekah Eklund - 2018 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 38 (2):207-208.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:The Sermon on the Mount and Moral Theology: A Virtue Perspective by William C. Mattison IIIRebekah EklundThe Sermon on the Mount and Moral Theology: A Virtue Perspective William C. Mattison III NEW YORK: CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS, 2017. 290 pp. £75.00Undergirding this book is a principle from the Catechism of the Catholic Church: the "analogy of faith" or "the coherence of the truths of faith among themselves" (241). the (...)
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  36.  11
    Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Modulates Corticospinal Excitability During Motor Training.Rebekah L. S. Summers, Mo Chen, Andrea Hatch & Teresa J. Kimberley - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  37.  8
    Genomics in research and health care with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.Rebekah McWhirter, Dianne Nicol & Julian Savulescu - 2015 - Monash Bioethics Review 33 (2-3):203-209.
    Genomics is increasingly becoming an integral component of health research and clinical care. The perceived difficulties associated with genetic research involving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people mean that they have largely been excluded as research participants. This limits the applicability of research findings for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients. Emergent use of genomic technologies and personalised medicine therefore risk contributing to an increase in existing health disparities unless urgent action is taken. To allow the potential benefits of genomics (...)
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  38.  11
    The labelled container: Conceptual development of social group representations.Rebekah A. Gelpi, Suraiya Allidina, Daniel Hoyer & William A. Cunningham - 2022 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 45.
    Pietraszewski contends that group representations that rely on a “containment metaphor” fail to adequately capture phenomena of group dynamics such as shifts in allegiances. We argue, in contrast, that social categories allow for computationally efficient, richly structured, and flexible group representations that explain some of the most intriguing aspects of social group behaviour.
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  39.  5
    Critical examination of the moral status of animals, with particular reference to the practices of factory farming and animal experimentation.Rebekah Humphreys - unknown
    There is extensive literature that indicates animals suffer considerably in the practices of factory farming and animal experimentation. In the light of the evidence of this suffering there is an urgent need to answer the question whether our current use of animals is ever morally justifiable. The aim of this thesis is to provide a critical examination of the moral status of animals and of our treatment of animals in these practices. My objective is to assess whether these practices are (...)
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  40.  11
    The Association Between Experimentally Induced Stress, Performance Monitoring, and Response Inhibition: An Event-Related Potential (ERP) Analysis.Rebekah E. Rodeback, Ariana Hedges-Muncy, Isaac J. Hunt, Kaylie A. Carbine, Patrick R. Steffen & Michael J. Larson - 2020 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
  41.  2
    Aesthetic and technical strategies for networked music performance.Rebekah Wilson - forthcoming - AI and Society.
  42. Why must God show himself in disguise : A look at the role of the mirror in attar's the conference of the birds.Rebekah Zwanzig - 2009 - In Leslie Anne Boldt-Irons, Corrado Federici & Ernesto Virgulti (eds.), Disguise, Deception, Trompe-L'oeil: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Peter Lang.
  43.  6
    Why Must God Show Himself in Disguise? An Exploration of Sufism within Farid Attar's" The Conference of the Birds.Rebekah Zwanzig - 2009 - In Leslie Anne Boldt-Irons, Corrado Federici & Ernesto Virgulti (eds.), Disguise, Deception, Trompe-L'oeil: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Peter Lang. pp. 99--273.
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  44.  8
    Investigating the cost to ongoing tasks not associated with prospective memory task requirements.Rebekah E. Smith & Shayne Loft - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 27:1-13.
  45.  10
    Agua-Biographies: Derrida on Water, Ontopology, and Refugees.Rebekah Sinclair - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 34 (3):353-366.
    Western metaphysics has long privileged solidity, presence, fixity, and substance, over the fluid, moving, intangible, and diffuse, that is, over water.1 Emmanuel Levinas noted that Western philosophy seems so incapable of thinking the liquid, moving, and dispersed, that even when we try, we only reduce the elemental to a multiplicity of solids.2 The problem, he concludes, is that water and other elements are "content without form," denying our metaphysical preferences for solidity and fixed shape, even as they are not mere (...)
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  46. Mental Causation.Rebekah L. H. Rice - 2017 - In Kevin Timpe, Meghan Griffith & Neil Levy (eds.), Routledge Companion to Free Will. New York: Routledge.
  47.  9
    And Say the Animal Resisted? Derrida, Biopolitics, and the Problem with Species.Rebekah Sinclair - 2019 - Environmental Philosophy 16 (1):115-140.
    My article does two things: 1) tracks Derrida’s claim that biopolitical and sovereign power use species taxonomies to performatively depoliticize and ignore the reciprocity of creaturely perspectives; and 2) argues Derrida makes possible a deconstruction of species, and demonstrates its necessity for better political futures. To do this, I follow Derrida’s criticism of autopsic logics and the circularity of metaphysics and zoology, and his affirmation of embodied singularity. Finally, I start and end with analyses of cetacean suicide: by privileging how (...)
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  48.  6
    Prophecy in a Secular Age: An Introduction.Rebekah Miles - 2022 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 42 (2):443-444.
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  49.  10
    The Wholeness of Humanity: Coleridge, Cognition, and Holistic Perception.Rebekah Wallace - 2022 - Zygon 57 (3):656-674.
    Holistic perception is an antidote to the subject–object divide, a divide that leads to a mechanistic understanding of the world and can see human beings only in terms of parts, without a robust articulation of wholeness. In this piece, I argue that philosopher of science Henri Bortoft offers an empirically grounded theory, based on consciousness studies, which recasts the problem of the many and the one, offering insight into just such a holistic perception. I further argue that Samuel Taylor Coleridge's (...)
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  50.  12
    Magnifying Grains of Sand, Seeds, and Blades of Grass: Optical Effects in Robert Grosseteste’s De iride (On the Rainbow).Rebekah C. White, Giles E. M. Gasper, Tom C. B. McLeish, Brian K. Tanner, Joshua S. Harvey, Sigbjørn O. Sønnesyn, Laura K. Young & Hannah E. Smithson - 2021 - Isis 112 (1):93-107.
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