Results for 'Rebecca Nast'

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  1.  19
    Trust trumps comprehension, visceral factors trump all: A psychological cascade constraining informed consent to clinical trials: A qualitative study with stable patients.Michael Rost, Rebecca Nast, Bernice S. Elger & David Shaw - 2021 - Research Ethics 17 (1):87-102.
    This paper addresses psychological factors that might interfere with informed consent on the part of stable patients as potential early-phase clinical trial participants. Thirty-six semistructured interviews with patients who had either diabetes or gout were conducted. We investigated stable patients’ attitudes towards participating in a fictitious first-in-human trial of a novel intervention. We focused on an in-depth analysis of those statements and explanations that indicated the existence of psychological factors impairing decision-making capacity. Three main themes emerged: insufficient comprehension of the (...)
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  2.  28
    The Vulnerability of the Individual Benefit Argument.Domnita O. Badarau, Rebecca L. Nast & David M. Shaw - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (12):17-18.
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  3.  39
    Autonomy and Fear of Synthetic Biology: How Can Patients’ Autonomy Be Enhanced in the Field of Synthetic Biology? A Qualitative Study with Stable Patients.Milenko Rakic, Isabelle Wienand, David Shaw, Rebecca Nast & Bernice S. Elger - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (2):375-388.
    We analyzed stable patients’ views regarding synthetic biology in general, the medical application of synthetic biology, and their potential participation in trials of synthetic biology in particular. The aim of the study was to find out whether patients’ views and preferences change after receiving more detailed information about synthetic biology and its clinical applications. The qualitative study was carried out with a purposive sample of 36 stable patients, who suffered from diabetes or gout. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, translated and fully (...)
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  4. Working virtue: virtue ethics and contemporary moral problems.Rebecca L. Walker & Philip J. Ivanhoe (eds.) - 2007 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    In Working Virtue: Virtue Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems, leading figures in the fields of virtue ethics and ethics come together to present the first ...
  5. Merleau-Ponty and Standpoint Theory.Rebecca Harrison - 2023 - In Patrick Londen, Jeffrey Yoshimi & Philip Walsh (eds.), Horizons of Phenomenology: Essays on the State of the Field and Its Applications. Springer Verlag. pp. 231-244.
    Over the course of its history, feminist standpoint theory has encountered a number of problems which reveal divisions among its supporters over certain fundamental philosophical commitments. This chapter sketches a phenomenological account of perception that can begin to address these problems, drawn largely from Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s Phenomenology of Perception. Merleau-Ponty can help us resolve these issues by providing an account of perspectival perception wherein a multiplicity of different perceptual standpoints all nonetheless put us in touch with a single external world, (...)
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  6. Performative Force, Convention, and Discursive Injustice.Rebecca Kukla - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (2):440-457.
    I explore how gender can shape the pragmatics of speech. In some circumstances, when a woman deploys standard discursive conventions in order to produce a speech act with a specific performative force, her utterance can turn out, in virtue of its uptake, to have a quite different force—a less empowering force—than it would have if performed by a man. When members of a disadvantaged group face a systematic inability to produce a specific kind of speech act that they are entitled (...)
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  7. Trust, Testimony, and Reasons for Belief.Rebecca Wallbank & Andrew Reisner - 2020 - In Kevin McCain & Scott Stapleford (eds.), Epistemic Duties: New Arguments, New Angles. Routledge.
    This chapter explores two kinds of testimonial trust, what we call ‘evidential trust’ and ‘non-evidential trust’ with the aim of asking how testimonial trust could provide epistemic reasons for belief. We argue that neither evidential nor non-evidential trust can play a distinctive role in providing evidential reasons for belief, but we tentatively propose that non-evidential trust can in some circumstances provide a novel kind of epistemic reason for belief, a reason of epistemic facilitation. The chapter begins with an extensive discussion (...)
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  8. Empirische Wissenschaften zur Gleichheitslehre.Rudolf Künast - 1981 - In Pierre Krebs (ed.), Das Unvergängliche Erbe: Alternativen zum Prinzip der Gleichheit. Tübingen: Grabert.
     
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  9.  6
    Residency Requirements for Medical Aid in Dying.Rebecca Dresser - 2024 - Hastings Center Report 54 (3):3-5.
    In 1997, when Oregon became the first U.S. jurisdiction authorizing medical aid in dying (MAID), its law included a requirement that patients be legal residents of the state. Other U.S. jurisdictions legalizing MAID followed Oregon in adopting residency requirements. Recent litigation challenges the legality, as well as the justification, for such requirements. Facing such challenges, Oregon and Vermont eliminated their MAID residency requirements. More states could follow this move, for, in certain circumstances, the U.S. Constitution's privileges and immunities clause protects (...)
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  10. Re-corporealizing vision.Heidi Nast & Audrey Kobayashi - 1996 - In Nancy Duncan (ed.), BodySpace: destabilizing geographies of gender and sexuality. New York: Routledge. pp. 75--93.
     
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  11.  17
    Translating psoriasis treatment guidelines into clinical practice – the need for educational interventions and strategies for broad dissemination.Alexander Nast, Ricardo Erdmann, Delano Pathirana & Berthold Rzany - 2008 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (5):803-806.
  12. Police launch the first investigation into ’virtual rape’.Rebecca Camber - forthcoming - Mail Online.
    The girl under the age of 16 is said to have been left distraught after her avatar - her digital character - was gang raped by the online strangers.
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  13.  37
    Unrequited.Rebecca Bamford - 2015 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (3):355-360.
    Abstract:I raise several concerns with Earp and colleagues' analysis of enhancement through neurochemical modulation of love as a key issue in contemporary neuroethics. These include: (i) strengthening their deflation of medicalization concerns by showing how the objection that love should be left outside of the scope of medicine would directly undermine the goal of medicine; (ii) developing stronger analysis of the social and political concerns relevant to neurochemical modulation of love, by exploring and suggesting possible counters to ways in which (...)
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  14.  17
    Charting ELSI’s Future Course: Lessons from the Recent Past.Rebecca Walker & Clair Morrissey - 2012 - Genetics in Medicine 14 (2):259-267.
    Purpose: We sought to examine the ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) literature research and scholarship types, topics, and contributing community fields of training as a first step to charting the broader ELSI community’s future priorities and goals. Methods: We categorized 642 articles and book chapters meeting inclusion criteria for content in both human genetics or genomics and ethics or ELSI during a 5-year period (2003–2008) according to research and scholarship types, topics, and the area of advanced training of the (...)
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  15. Toward an ethic of intimacy : touring and trophy hunting for elephants in Africa.Rebecca Hardin - 2008 - In Christen M. Wemmer & Catherine A. Christen (eds.), Elephants and ethics: toward a morality of coexistence. Baltimore, Md.: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 419.
     
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  16.  82
    Re‐Thinking Relations in Human Rights Education: The Politics of Narratives.Rebecca Adami - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (2):293-307.
    Human Rights Education (HRE) has traditionally been articulated in terms of cultivating better citizens or world citizens. The main preoccupation in this strand of HRE has been that of bridging a gap between universal notions of a human rights subject and the actual locality and particular narratives in which students are enmeshed. This preoccupation has focused on ‘learning about the other’ in order to improve relations between plural ‘others’ and ‘us’ and reflects educational aims of national identity politics in citizenship (...)
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  17. Working Virtue. Virtue Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems.Rebecca L. Walker & Philip J. Ivanhoe - 2007 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 69 (4):779-780.
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  18. To be Real: Telling the Truth and Changing the Face of Feminism.Rebecca Walker - 1995 - Doubleday.
    Controversial and provocative, To Be Real is a blueprint for the creation of a new political force.
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  19. Normative Practices of Other Animals.Sarah Vincent, Rebecca Ring & Kristin Andrews - 2018 - In Aaron Zimmerman, Karen Jones & Mark Timmons (eds.), Routledge Handbook on Moral Epistemology. New York: Routledge. pp. 57-83.
    Traditionally, discussions of moral participation – and in particular moral agency – have focused on fully formed human actors. There has been some interest in the development of morality in humans, as well as interest in cultural differences when it comes to moral practices, commitments, and actions. However, until relatively recently, there has been little focus on the possibility that nonhuman animals have any role to play in morality, save being the objects of moral concern. Moreover, when nonhuman cases are (...)
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  20. Two Kinds of Unknowing.Rebecca Mason - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (2):294-307.
    Miranda Fricker claims that a “gap” in collective hermeneutical resources with respect to the social experiences of marginalized groups prevents members of those groups from understanding their own experiences (Fricker 2007). I argue that because Fricker misdescribes dominant hermeneutical resources as collective, she fails to locate the ethically bad epistemic practices that maintain gaps in dominant hermeneutical resources even while alternative interpretations are in fact offered by non-dominant discourses. Fricker's analysis of hermeneutical injustice does not account for the possibility that (...)
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  21. The metaphysics of social kinds.Rebecca Mason - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (12):841-850.
    It is a truism that humans are social animals. Thus, it is no surprise that we understand the world, each other, and ourselves in terms of social kinds such as money and marriage, war and women, capitalists and cartels, races, recessions, and refugees. Social kinds condition our expectations, inform our preferences, and guide our behavior. Despite the prevalence and importance of social kinds, philosophy has historically devoted relatively little attention to them. With few exceptions, philosophers have given pride of place (...)
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  22.  15
    Darwin's ghosts: the secret history of evolution.Rebecca Stott - 2012 - New York: Spiegel & Grau.
    Evolution was not discovered single-handedly, Rebecca Stott argues, contrary to what has become standard lore, but is an idea that emerged over many centuries, advanced by daring individuals across the globe who had the imagination to speculate on nature's extraordinary ways, and who had the courage to articulate such speculations at a time when to do so was often considered heresy.
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  23.  44
    Serial Participation and the Ethics of Phase 1 Healthy Volunteer Research.Rebecca L. Walker, Marci D. Cottingham & Jill A. Fisher - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (1):83-114.
    Phase 1 healthy volunteer clinical trials—which financially compensate subjects in tests of drug toxicity levels and side effects—appear to place pressure on each joint of the moral framework justifying research. In this article, we review concerns about phase 1 trials as they have been framed in the bioethics literature, including undue inducement and coercion, unjust exploitation, and worries about compromised data validity. We then revisit these concerns in light of the lived experiences of serial participants who are income-dependent on phase (...)
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  24.  9
    A Creative Storytelling Project with Women Migrants in Johannesburg, South Africa.Rebecca Walker & Elsa Oliveira - 2020 - Studies in Social Justice 2020 (14):188-209.
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  25. Bridges & Barriers to Development: Communication Modes, Media, and Devices.Rebecca Walton - forthcoming - Topoi.
     
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  26. Cosmopolitan Ethics: The Home and the World.Rebecca L. Walkowitz - 2000 - In Marjorie B. Garber, Beatrice Hanssen & Rebecca L. Walkowitz (eds.), The Turn to Ethics. Routledge. pp. 221--230.
  27.  57
    Intellectual generosity and the reward structure of mathematics.Rebecca Lea Morris - 2020 - Synthese (1-2):1-23.
    Prominent mathematician William Thurston was praised by other mathematicians for his intellectual generosity. But what does it mean to say Thurston was intellectually generous? And is being intellectually generous beneficial? To answer these questions I turn to virtue epistemology and, in particular, Roberts and Wood's (2007) analysis of intellectual generosity. By appealing to Thurston's own writings and interviewing mathematicians who knew and worked with him, I argue that Roberts and Wood's analysis nicely captures the sense in which he was intellectually (...)
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  28.  15
    The Neural Basis of Individual Face and Object Perception.Rebecca Watson, Elisabeth M. J. Huis in ’T. Veld & Beatrice de Gelder - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10:171072.
    We routinely need to process the identity of many faces around us, and how the brain achieves this is still the subject of much research in cognitive neuroscience. To date, insights on face identity processing have come from both healthy and clinical populations. However, in order to directly compare results across and within participant groups, and across different studies, it is crucial that a standard task is utilised which includes different exemplars (for example, non-face stimuli along with faces), is memory-neutral, (...)
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  29.  96
    Passport to freedom? Immunity passports for COVID-19.Rebecca C. H. Brown, Julian Savulescu, Bridget Williams & Dominic Wilkinson - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (10):652-659.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has led a number of countries to introduce restrictive ‘lockdown’ policies on their citizens in order to control infection spread. Immunity passports have been proposed as a way of easing the harms of such policies, and could be used in conjunction with other strategies for infection control. These passports would permit those who test positive for COVID-19 antibodies to return to some of their normal behaviours, such as travelling more freely and returning to work. The introduction of (...)
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  30.  23
    Thresholds in feminist geography: difference, methodology, and representation.John Paul Jones, Heidi J. Nast & Susan M. Roberts (eds.) - 1997 - Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Ever want to be famous? They didn't. It just sorta happened. Playing for friends at a pizzeria one day - full-on, massive world tour the next. Insane to a power of ten. Then, right in the middle the madness, they crash and burn. The reality of life is - stuff happens... Now, their fans are asking - what is it going to take to get pop music's latest 'phenomenon' back together? Can it even be done? In the fast paced, high-pressure (...)
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  31. Social kinds are essentially mind-dependent.Rebecca Mason - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 178 (12):3975-3994.
    I defend a novel view of how social kinds (e.g., money, women, permanent residents) depend on our mental states. In particular, I argue that social kinds depend on our mental states in the following sense: it is essential to them that they exist (partially) because certain mental states exist. This analysis is meant to capture the very general way in which all social kinds depend on our mental states. However, my view is that particular social kinds also depend on our (...)
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  32. Against Social Kind Anti-Realism.Rebecca Mason - forthcoming - Metaphysics 3 (1):55-67.
    The view that social kinds (e.g., money, migrant, marriage) are mind-dependent is a prominent one in the social ontology literature. However, in addition to the claim that social kinds are mind-dependent, it is often asserted that social kinds are not real because they are mind-dependent. Call this view social kind anti-realism. To defend their view, social kind anti-realists must accomplish two tasks. First, they must identify a dependence relation that obtains between social kinds and our mental states. Call this the (...)
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  33. Human and animal subjects of research: The moral significance of respect versus welfare.Rebecca L. Walker - 2006 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (4):305-331.
    Human beings with diminished decision-making capacities are usually thought to require greater protections from the potential harms of research than fully autonomous persons. Animal subjects of research receive lesser protections than any human beings regardless of decision-making capacity. Paradoxically, however, it is precisely animals’ lack of some characteristic human capacities that is commonly invoked to justify using them for human purposes. In other words, for humans lesser capacities correspond to greater protections but for animals the opposite is true. Without explicit (...)
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  34.  7
    Onward, Christian penguins: wildlife film and the image of scientific authority.Rebecca Wexler - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 39 (3):273-279.
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  35.  50
    Character and object.Rebecca Morris & Jeremy Avigad - 2016 - Review of Symbolic Logic 9 (3):480-510.
    In 1837, Dirichlet proved that there are infinitely many primes in any arithmetic progression in which the terms do not all share a common factor. Modern presentations of the proof are explicitly higher-order, in that they involve quantifying over and summing over Dirichlet characters, which are certain types of functions. The notion of a character is only implicit in Dirichlet’s original proof, and the subsequent history shows a very gradual transition to the modern mode of presentation. In this essay, we (...)
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  36. Social Ontology.Rebecca Mason & Katherine Ritchie - 2020 - In Ricki Bliss & James Miller (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Metametaphysics. New York, NY: Routledge.
    Traditionally, social entities (i.e., social properties, facts, kinds, groups, institutions, and structures) have not fallen within the purview of mainstream metaphysics. In this chapter, we consider whether the exclusion of social entities from mainstream metaphysics is philosophically warranted or if it instead rests on historical accident or bias. We examine three ways one might attempt to justify excluding social metaphysics from the domain of metaphysical inquiry and argue that each fails. Thus, we conclude that social entities are not justifiably excluded (...)
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  37.  26
    Temporizing after Spinal Cord Injury.Rebecca L. Volpe, Joshua S. Crites & Kristi L. Kirschner - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (2):8-10.
    Mr. C is a twenty‐two‐year‐old who was flown to a level‐1 trauma center after diving headfirst into shallow water. Prior to this accident, he was in excellent health. At the scene, he had been conscious but was paralyzed and had no sensation below his neck. The emergency medical services team immobilized Mr. C's neck with a cervical collar and intubated him for airway protection before transport. As Mr. C's medical care proceeds, he expresses a desire for extubation, although it was (...)
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  38. Women Are Not Adult Human Females.Rebecca Mason - 2024 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 102 (1):180-191.
    1 Some philosophers defend the thesis that women are adult human females. Call this the adult human female thesis (AHF). There are two versions of this thesis—one modal and one definitional. Accord...
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  39.  39
    Testimony and Narrative as a Political Relation: The Question of Ethical Judgment in Education.Rebecca Adami & Marie Hållander - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (1):1-13.
    In this article, we explore the role of film in educational settings and argue that testimony and narrative are dependent upon each other for developing ethical judgments. We use the film 12 Angry Men to enhance our thesis that the emotional response that sometimes is intended in using film as testimonies in classrooms requires a specific listening; a listening that puts pupils at risk when they relate testimonies to their own life narratives. The article raises the importance of listening in (...)
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  40. Neo-Aristotelian Supererogation.Rebecca Stangl - 2016 - Ethics 126 (2):339-365.
    I develop and defend the following neo-Aristotelian account of supererogation: an action is supererogatory if and only if it is overall virtuous and either the omission of an overall virtuous action in that situation would not be overall vicious or there is some overall virtuous action that is less virtuous than it and whose performance in its place would not be overall vicious. I develop this account from within the virtue-ethical tradition. And I argue that it is intuitively defensible and (...)
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  41.  17
    From Clientelism to Cooperation: Local Government, Participatory Policy, and Civic Organizing in Porto Alegre, Brazil.Rebecca Abers - 1998 - Politics and Society 26 (4):511-537.
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  42.  76
    To Tell the Truth, the Whole Truth, May Do Patients Harm: The Problem of the Nocebo Effect for Informed Consent.Rebecca Erwin Wells & Ted J. Kaptchuk - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (3):22-29.
    The principle of informed consent obligates physicians to explain possible side effects when prescribing medications. This disclosure may itself induce adverse effects through expectancy mechanisms known as nocebo effects, contradicting the principle of nonmaleficence. Rigorous research suggests that providing patients with a detailed enumeration of every possible adverse event—especially subjective self-appraised symptoms—can actually increase side effects. Describing one version of what might happen (clinical “facts”) may actually create outcomes that are different from what would have happened without this information (another (...)
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  43.  7
    Artificial grammar learning by 1-year-olds leads to specific and abstract knowledge.Rebecca L. Gomez & LouAnn Gerken - 1999 - Cognition 70 (2):109-135.
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  44.  26
    Plato at the Googleplex: why philosophy won't go away.Rebecca Goldstein - 2014 - New York: Pantheon.
    From the acclaimed writer and thinker--whose award-winning books include both fiction and non-fiction--a dazzlingly original plunge into the drama of philosophy, revealing its hidden but essential role in today's debates on love, religion, politics, and science. Imagine that Plato came to life in the 21st century and set out on a multi-city speaking tour: How would he handle a host on Fox News who challenges him on religion and morality? How would he mediate a debate on the best way to (...)
  45. Hermeneutical Injustice.Rebecca Mason - 2021 - In Justin Khoo & Rachel Sterken (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Social and Political Philosophy of Language. Routledge.
  46.  10
    Crossing thresholds.John Paul Jones Iii, Heidi Nast & Susan Roberts - 1997 - In John Paul Jones, Heidi J. Nast & Susan M. Roberts (eds.), Thresholds in feminist geography: difference, methodology, and representation. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
  47.  39
    Ode to positive constructive daydreaming.Rebecca L. McMillan, Scott Barry Kaufman & Jerome L. Singer - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
  48. Introduction.Rebecca L. Walker & Philip J. Ivanhoe - 2007 - In Rebecca L. Walker & Philip J. Ivanhoe (eds.), Working virtue: virtue ethics and contemporary moral problems. New York: Oxford University Press.
     
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  49. Glittering Vices: A New Look at the Seven Deadly Sins.Rebecca DeYoung - 2009 - Grand Rapids: Brazos Press.
    Contemporary culture trivializes the "seven deadly sins," or vices, as if they have no serious moral or spiritual implications. Glittering Vices clears this misconception by exploring the traditional meanings of gluttony, sloth, lust, and others. It offers a brief history of how the vices were compiled and an eye opening explication of how each sin manifests itself in various destructive behaviors. Readers gain practical understanding of how the vices shape our culture today and how to correctly identify and eliminate the (...)
     
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  50. Expressions of emotion as perceptual media.Rebecca Rowson - 2023 - Synthese 201 (6):1-23.
    Expressions of emotion pose a serious challenge to the view that we perceive other people’s emotions directly. If we must perceive expressions in order to perceive emotions, then it is only ever the expressions that we are directly aware of, not emotions themselves. This paper develops a new response to this challenge by drawing an analogy between expressions of emotion and perceptual media. It is through illumination and sound, the paradigmatic examples of perceptual media, that we can see and hear (...)
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