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Rebecca DeYoung
Calvin University
  1. The Roots of Despair.Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung - 2015 - Res Philosophica 92 (4):829-854.
    This paper is an exploration of the Thomistic vice of despair, one of two vices opposed to the theological virtue of hope. Aquinas's conception of despair as a vice, and a theological vice in particular, distances him from contemporary use of the term "despair" to describe an emotional state. His account nonetheless yields a compelling psychological portrait of moral degeneration, which I explain via despair's link to its "root," the capital vice of sloth. Cases in which sloth and its offspring (...)
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  2. Practicing Hope.Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung - 2014 - Res Philosophica 91 (3):387-410.
    In this essay, I consider how the theological virtue of hope might be practiced. I will first explain Thomas Aquinas’s account of this virtue, including its structural relation to the passion of hope, its opposing vices, and its relationship to the friendship of charity. Then, using narrative and character analysis from the film The Shawshank Redemption, I examine a range of hopeful and proto-hopeful practices concerning both the goods one hopes for and the power one relies on to attain those (...)
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  3.  10
    Aquinas's Ethics: Metaphysical Foundations, Moral Theory, and Theological Context.Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung, Colleen McCluskey & Christina van Dyke - 2009 - University of Notre Dame Press. Edited by Colleen McCluskey & Christina van Dyke.
    The purpose of __Aquinas's Ethics__ is to place Thomas Aquinas's moral theory in its full philosophical and theological context and to do so in a way that makes Aquinas readily accessible to students and interested general readers, including those encountering Aquinas for the first time. Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung, Colleen McCluskey, and Christina Van Dyke begin by explaining Aquinas's theories of the human person and human action, since these ground his moral theory. In their interpretation, Aquinas's theological commitments crucially shape his (...)
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  4.  9
    Vainglory: The Forgotten Vice.Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung - 2014 - Grand Rapids: Eerdmans.
    Julia Roberts on the red carpet at the Oscars. Lady Gaga singing “Applause” to worshipful fans at one of her sold-out concerts. And you and me in our Sunday best in the front row at church. What do we have in common? Chances are, says Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung, that we all suffer from vainglory -- a keen desire for attention and approval. Although contemporary culture has largely forgotten about vainglory, it was on the original list of seven capital vices and (...)
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  5. Aquinas’s Virtues of Acknowledged Dependence.Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung - 2004 - Faith and Philosophy 21 (2):214-227.
    This paper compares Aristotle’s and Aquinas’s accounts of the virtue of magnanimity specifically as a corrective to the vice of pusillanimity. After definingpusillanimity and underscoring key features of Aristotelian magnanimity, I explain how Aquinas’s account of Christian magnanimity, by making humandependence on God fundamental to this virtue, not only clarifies the differences between the vice of pusillanimity and the virtue of humility, but also showswhy only Christian magnanimity can free us from improper and damaging forms of dependence on the opinions (...)
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  6. What are You Guarding? Virtuous Anger and Lifelong Formation.Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung - 2021 - In Adam C. Pelser & W. Scott Cleveland (eds.), Faith and Virtue Formation: Christian Philosophy in Aid of Becoming Good. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 20-47.
    A reconciliation of different approaches to anger in the Christian moral tradition, with cautions and recommendations for virtuous anger formation.
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  7. Moral Education in the Classroom: A Lived Experiment.Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung & Rebecca DeYoung - 2020 - Expositions: An Interdisciplinary Study in the Humanities 1 (14).
    What would a course on ethics look like if it took into account Alasdair MacIntyre’s concerns about actually teaching students ethical practices? How could professors induct students into practices that prompt both reflection on their cultural formation and self-knowledge of the ways they have been formed by it? According to MacIntyre, such elements are prerequisites for an adequate moral education. His criticism of what he terms “Morality” includes the claim that most courses don’t even try to teach the right things. (...)
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  8. Virtue.Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung & Rebecca DeYoung - 2017 - In Daniel Treir & Walter Elwell (eds.), Evangelical Dictionary of Theology, 3rd edition. Grand Rapids, MI, USA:
    Virtue in Scripture What is a Virtue? The History of Virtue and the Human Good (Plato, Aristotle, Stoics, medieval Christians, Hume, Kant, Foot, MacIntyre) Challenges to Virtue (situationism) Bibliography.
     
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  9.  11
    Book Review: Courage as a Christian Virtue. [REVIEW]Rebecca Konyndyk Deyoung - 2013 - Journal of Spiritual Formation and Soul Care 6 (2):301-312.
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  10.  5
    Aquinas on Virtue: A Causal Reading. [REVIEW]Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung - 2017 - Review of Metaphysics 71 (4).
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  11. Review of Love of self and love of God in thirteenth century ethics. [REVIEW]Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (2):329-330.
    Thomas Osborne's study is doubly successful—first, as a careful account of the historical sources and multiple layers of concerns shaping thirteenth-century debates about whether God can be naturally loved more than oneself. Second, it is also an excellent articulation of the metaphysical and conceptual gaps between ancient and medieval eudaimonistic ethical theories and contemporary morality. Both thirteenth-century..
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  12.  15
    Review of The Psychology of Character and Virtue. [REVIEW]Rebecca Konyndyk Deyoung - 2012 - Faith and Philosophy 29 (3):366-8.
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