Results for 'Rebecca Kaufman'

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  1.  38
    Ode to positive constructive daydreaming.Rebecca L. McMillan, Scott Barry Kaufman & Jerome L. Singer - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
  2.  9
    What Do We Owe to Baby Jane?Rebecca L. Burke, Grace Powers Monaco & Rick Kaufman - 1984 - Hastings Center Report 14 (4):49-50.
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  3.  65
    Clarifying the discussion on brain death.T. Forcht Dagi & Rebecca Kaufman - 2001 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (5):503 – 525.
    Definitions of death are based on subjective standards, priorities, and social conventions rather than on objective facts about the state of human physiology. It is the meaning assigned to the facts that determines whensomeone may be deemed to have died, not the facts themselves. Even though subjective standards for the diagnosis of death show remarkable consistency across communities, they are extrinsic. They are driven, implicitly or explicitly, by ideas about what benefits the community rather than what benefits the indidvidual. The (...)
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  4. Working virtue: virtue ethics and contemporary moral problems.Rebecca L. Walker & Philip J. Ivanhoe (eds.) - 2007 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    In Working Virtue: Virtue Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems, leading figures in the fields of virtue ethics and ethics come together to present the first ...
  5. Trust, Testimony, and Reasons for Belief.Rebecca Wallbank & Andrew Reisner - 2020 - In Kevin McCain & Scott Stapleford (eds.), Epistemic Duties: New Arguments, New Angles. Routledge.
    This chapter explores two kinds of testimonial trust, what we call ‘evidential trust’ and ‘non-evidential trust’ with the aim of asking how testimonial trust could provide epistemic reasons for belief. We argue that neither evidential nor non-evidential trust can play a distinctive role in providing evidential reasons for belief, but we tentatively propose that non-evidential trust can in some circumstances provide a novel kind of epistemic reason for belief, a reason of epistemic facilitation. The chapter begins with an extensive discussion (...)
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  6.  83
    Karma, rebirth, and the problem of evil.Whitley Kaufman - 2009 - In Kevin Timpe (ed.), Arguing about religion. New York: Routledge. pp. 222.
    The doctrine of karma and rebirth is often praised for its ability to offer a successful solution to the Problem of Evil. This essay evaluates such a claim by considering whether the doctrine can function as a systematic theodicy, as an explanation of all human suffering in terms of wrongs done in either this or past lives. This purported answer to the Problem of Evil must face a series of objections, including the problem of anylackofmemoryofpastlives,the lack of proportionality between wrongdoing (...)
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  7.  23
    Diesing and Piccone on Kaufman.Arnold S. Kaufman - 1967 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 10 (1-4):211-216.
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  8. Performative Force, Convention, and Discursive Injustice.Rebecca Kukla - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (2):440-457.
    I explore how gender can shape the pragmatics of speech. In some circumstances, when a woman deploys standard discursive conventions in order to produce a speech act with a specific performative force, her utterance can turn out, in virtue of its uptake, to have a quite different force—a less empowering force—than it would have if performed by a man. When members of a disadvantaged group face a systematic inability to produce a specific kind of speech act that they are entitled (...)
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  9.  81
    Is there a “right” to self‐defense?Whitley Kaufman - 2004 - Criminal Justice Ethics 23 (1):20-32.
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  10. Working Virtue. Virtue Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems.Rebecca L. Walker & Philip J. Ivanhoe - 2007 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 69 (4):779-780.
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  11.  6
    Augustine and Corruption.Peter Lver Kaufman - 2009 - History of Political Thought 30:1.
  12. To be Real: Telling the Truth and Changing the Face of Feminism.Rebecca Walker - 1995 - Doubleday.
    Controversial and provocative, To Be Real is a blueprint for the creation of a new political force.
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  13.  20
    Simultaneous segmentation and generalisation of non-adjacent dependencies from continuous speech.Rebecca L. A. Frost & Padraic Monaghan - 2016 - Cognition 147 (C):70-74.
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  14.  79
    James Hillman's A Terrible Love of War Chris Hedges' War Is A Force That Gives Us Meaning and Barbara Ehrenreich's Blood Rites.Whitley Kaufman - 2006 - Journal of Military Ethics 5 (1):67-73.
    (2006). James Hillman's A Terrible Love of War Chris Hedges’ War Is A Force That Gives Us Meaning and Barbara Ehrenreich's Blood Rites. Journal of Military Ethics: Vol. 5, No. 1, pp. 67-73.
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  15.  22
    What is the Scope of Civilian Immunity in Wartime?Whitley Kaufman - 2003 - Journal of Military Ethics 2 (3):186-194.
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  16.  3
    Human nature and the limits of Darwinism.Whitley R. P. Kaufman - 2016 - New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    This book compares two competing theories of human nature: the more traditional theory espoused in different forms by centuries of western philosophy and the newer, Darwinian model. In the traditional view, the human being is a hybrid being, with a lower, animal nature and a higher, rational or “spiritual” component. The competing Darwinian account does away with the idea of a higher nature and attempts to provide a complete reduction of human nature to the evolutionary goals of survival and reproduction. (...)
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  17.  42
    Serial Participation and the Ethics of Phase 1 Healthy Volunteer Research.Rebecca L. Walker, Marci D. Cottingham & Jill A. Fisher - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (1):83-114.
    Phase 1 healthy volunteer clinical trials—which financially compensate subjects in tests of drug toxicity levels and side effects—appear to place pressure on each joint of the moral framework justifying research. In this article, we review concerns about phase 1 trials as they have been framed in the bioethics literature, including undue inducement and coercion, unjust exploitation, and worries about compromised data validity. We then revisit these concerns in light of the lived experiences of serial participants who are income-dependent on phase (...)
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  18. The Philosophy of Creativity.Elliot Samuel Paul & Scott Barry Kaufman (eds.) - 2014 - New York: Oxford University Press.
  19.  69
    Motivated proofs: What they are, why they matter and how to write them.Rebecca Lea Morris - 2020 - Review of Symbolic Logic 13 (1):23-46.
    Mathematicians judge proofs to possess, or lack, a variety of different qualities, including, for example, explanatory power, depth, purity, beauty and fit. Philosophers of mathematical practice have begun to investigate the nature of such qualities. However, mathematicians frequently draw attention to another desirable proof quality: being motivated. Intuitively, motivated proofs contain no "puzzling" steps, but they have received little further analysis. In this paper, I begin a philosophical investigation into motivated proofs. I suggest that a proof is motivated if and (...)
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  20. In Defense of Transracialism.Rebecca Tuvel - 2017 - Hypatia 32 (2):263-278.
    Former NAACP chapter head Rachel Dolezal's attempted transition from the white to the black race occasioned heated controversy. Her story gained notoriety at the same time that Caitlyn Jenner graced the cover of Vanity Fair, signaling a growing acceptance of transgender identity. Yet criticisms of Dolezal for misrepresenting her birth race indicate a widespread social perception that it is neither possible nor acceptable to change one's race in the way it might be to change one's sex. Considerations that support transgenderism (...)
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  21.  78
    Re‐Thinking Relations in Human Rights Education: The Politics of Narratives.Rebecca Adami - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (2):293-307.
    Human Rights Education (HRE) has traditionally been articulated in terms of cultivating better citizens or world citizens. The main preoccupation in this strand of HRE has been that of bridging a gap between universal notions of a human rights subject and the actual locality and particular narratives in which students are enmeshed. This preoccupation has focused on ‘learning about the other’ in order to improve relations between plural ‘others’ and ‘us’ and reflects educational aims of national identity politics in citizenship (...)
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  22.  40
    The Unfinished Business of Respect for Autonomy: Persons, Relationships, and Nonhuman Animals.Rebecca L. Walker - 2020 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 45 (4-5):521-539.
    This essay explores three issues in respect for autonomy that pose unfinished business for the concept. By this, I mean that the dialogue over them is ongoing and essentially unresolved. These are: whether we ought to respect persons or their autonomous choices; the role of relational autonomy; and whether nonhuman animals can be autonomous. In attending to this particular set of unfinished business, I highlight some critical moral work left aside by the concept of respect for autonomy as understood in (...)
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  23.  51
    Public expectations for return of results from large-cohort genetic research.Juli Murphy, Joan Scott, David Kaufman, Gail Geller, Lisa LeRoy & Kathy Hudson - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (11):36 – 43.
    The National Institutes of Health and other federal health agencies are considering establishing a national biobank to study the roles of genes and environment in human health. A preliminary public engagement study was conducted to assess public attitudes and concerns about the proposed biobank, including the expectations for return of individual research results. A total of 141 adults of different ages, incomes, genders, ethnicities, and races participated in 16 focus groups in six locations across the country. Focus group participants voiced (...)
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  24. Human and animal subjects of research: The moral significance of respect versus welfare.Rebecca L. Walker - 2006 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (4):305-331.
    Human beings with diminished decision-making capacities are usually thought to require greater protections from the potential harms of research than fully autonomous persons. Animal subjects of research receive lesser protections than any human beings regardless of decision-making capacity. Paradoxically, however, it is precisely animals’ lack of some characteristic human capacities that is commonly invoked to justify using them for human purposes. In other words, for humans lesser capacities correspond to greater protections but for animals the opposite is true. Without explicit (...)
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  25.  18
    L’Antiquité politique de Jean-Jacques Rousseau: entre exemples et modèles L’Antiquité politique de Jean-Jacques Rousseau: entre exemples et modèles, by Flora Champy. Paris, Classiques Garnier, 2022, 632 pp., 32€(pb), ISBN 978-2-406-12530-3. [REVIEW]Rebecca Wilkin - 2024 - Intellectual History Review 34 (2):506-509.
    Flora Champy shows how Rousseau developed his political philosophy by reference to ancient examples, intertexts, and interlocutors. Her literary methodology involves close readings of published tex...
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  26. The fallacy of the principle of procreative beneficence.Rebecca Bennett - 2008 - Bioethics 23 (5):265-273.
    The claim that we have a moral obligation, where a choice can be made, to bring to birth the 'best' child possible, has been highly controversial for a number of decades. More recently Savulescu has labelled this claim the Principle of Procreative Beneficence. It has been argued that this Principle is problematic in both its reasoning and its implications, most notably in that it places lower moral value on the disabled. Relentless criticism of this proposed moral obligation, however, has been (...)
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  27.  47
    Character and object.Rebecca Morris & Jeremy Avigad - 2016 - Review of Symbolic Logic 9 (3):480-510.
    In 1837, Dirichlet proved that there are infinitely many primes in any arithmetic progression in which the terms do not all share a common factor. Modern presentations of the proof are explicitly higher-order, in that they involve quantifying over and summing over Dirichlet characters, which are certain types of functions. The notion of a character is only implicit in Dirichlet’s original proof, and the subsequent history shows a very gradual transition to the modern mode of presentation. In this essay, we (...)
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  28.  19
    Ethics briefing.Rebecca Mussell, Sophie Brannan, Caroline Ann Harrison, Veronica English & Julian C. Sheather - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (8):575-576.
    Legal battles continue in the UK over the Government’s plans to transport asylum seekers arriving on British shores to Rwanda in East Africa. Originally announced as a system for ‘processing’ asylum seekers, the Government has subsequently made it clear that there would not be an option for asylum seekers to return to the UK. The arrangement forms part of a deal between the UK and Rwanda, with the UK promising to invest £120 m in economic growth and development in Rwanda, (...)
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  29.  82
    Generation Y’s Ethical Ideology and Its Potential Workplace Implications.Rebecca A. VanMeter, Douglas B. Grisaffe, Lawrence B. Chonko & James A. Roberts - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):93-109.
    Generation Y is a cohort of the population larger than the baby boom generation. Consisting of approximately 80 million people born between 1981 and 2000, Generation Y is the most recent cohort to enter the workforce. Workplaces are being redefined and organizations are being pressed to adapt as this new wave of workers is infused into business environments. One critical aspect of this phenomenon not receiving sufficient research attention is the impact of Gen Y ethical beliefs and ethical conduct in (...)
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  30.  36
    Artificial grammar learning by 1-year-olds leads to specific and abstract knowledge.Rebecca L. Gomez & LouAnn Gerken - 1999 - Cognition 70 (2):109-135.
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  31.  20
    Ethics briefings.Rebecca Mussell, Natalie Michaux & Molly Gray - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (10):721-722.
    The Nuffield Council on Bioethics (NCOB) is delighted to pick up the mantel of the Ethics briefings. For readers less familiar with the NCOB’s work, we are a leading independent policy and research centre, and the foremost bioethics body in the UK. We identify, analyse and advise on ethical issues in biomedicine and health so that decisions in these areas benefit people and society.1 Established in 1991, the NCOB has tackled a wide range of bioethics and medical ethics issues over (...)
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  32.  75
    Do mathematical explanations have instrumental value?Rebecca Lea Morris - 2019 - Synthese (2):1-20.
    Scientific explanations are widely recognized to have instrumental value by helping scientists make predictions and control their environment. In this paper I raise, and provide a first analysis of, the question whether explanatory proofs in mathematics have analogous instrumental value. I first identify an important goal in mathematical practice: reusing resources from existing proofs to solve new problems. I then consider the more specific question: do explanatory proofs have instrumental value by promoting reuse of the resources they contain? In general, (...)
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  33. Introducing THE PHILOSOPHY OF CREATIVITY.Elliot Samuel Paul & Scott Barry Kaufman - 2014 - In Elliot Samuel Paul & Scott Barry Kaufman (eds.), The Philosophy of Creativity. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 3-14.
    Creativity pervades human life. It is the mark of individuality, the vehicle of self-expression, and the engine of progress in every human endeavor. It also raises a wealth of neglected and yet evocative philosophical questions: What is the role of consciousness in the creative process? How does the audience for a work for art influence its creation? How can creativity emerge through childhood pretending? Do great works of literature give us insight into human nature? Can a computer program really be (...)
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  34.  52
    Intellectual generosity and the reward structure of mathematics.Rebecca Lea Morris - 2020 - Synthese (1-2):1-23.
    Prominent mathematician William Thurston was praised by other mathematicians for his intellectual generosity. But what does it mean to say Thurston was intellectually generous? And is being intellectually generous beneficial? To answer these questions I turn to virtue epistemology and, in particular, Roberts and Wood's (2007) analysis of intellectual generosity. By appealing to Thurston's own writings and interviewing mathematicians who knew and worked with him, I argue that Roberts and Wood's analysis nicely captures the sense in which he was intellectually (...)
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  35.  6
    The Ethics of Teaching Rhetorical Intertextuality.Rebecca Moore Howard & Sandra Jamieson - 2021 - Journal of Academic Ethics 19 (3):385-405.
    Three approaches to intertextual writing are available to college instructors: mechanical, ethical, and rhetorical. The mechanical approach, a staple of writing instruction, teaches the use of citation styles such as MLA or APA; methods of citing sources; and the conventions of quotation. The ethical approach is primarily concerned with the character of individual writers and their adherence to community standards categorized as “academic integrity.” The great majority of source-based writing instruction attends to one or both of these approaches. A third (...)
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  36.  85
    How can you patent genes?Rebecca S. Eisenberg - 2002 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (3):3 – 11.
    What accounts for the continued lack of clarity over the legal procedures for the patenting of DNA sequences? The patenting system was built for a "bricks-and-mortar" world rather than an information economy. The fact that genes are both material molecules and informational systems helps explain the difficulty that the patent system is going to continue to have.
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  37. Neo-Aristotelian Supererogation.Rebecca Stangl - 2016 - Ethics 126 (2):339-365.
    I develop and defend the following neo-Aristotelian account of supererogation: an action is supererogatory if and only if it is overall virtuous and either the omission of an overall virtuous action in that situation would not be overall vicious or there is some overall virtuous action that is less virtuous than it and whose performance in its place would not be overall vicious. I develop this account from within the virtue-ethical tradition. And I argue that it is intuitively defensible and (...)
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  38. Hermeneutical Injustice.Rebecca Mason - 2021 - In Justin Khoo & Rachel Sterken (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Social and Political Philosophy of Language. Routledge.
  39. Introduction.Rebecca L. Walker & Philip J. Ivanhoe - 2007 - In Rebecca L. Walker & Philip J. Ivanhoe (eds.), Working virtue: virtue ethics and contemporary moral problems. New York: Oxford University Press.
     
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  40.  6
    Artificial grammar learning by 1-year-olds leads to specific and abstract knowledge.Rebecca L. Gomez & LouAnn Gerken - 1999 - Cognition 70 (2):109-135.
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  41.  11
    Fetal–Maternal Intra-action: Politics of New Placental Biologies.Rebecca Scott Yoshizawa - 2016 - Body and Society 22 (4):79-105.
    Extensively employed in reproductive science, the term fetal–maternal interface describes how maternal and fetal tissues interact in the womb to produce the transient placenta, purporting a theory of pregnancy where ‘mother’, ‘fetus’, and ‘placenta’ are already-separate entities. However, considerable scientific evidence supports a different theory, which is also elaborated in feminist and new materialist literatures. Informed by interviews with placenta scientists as well as secondary sources on placental immunology and the developmental origins of health and disease, I explore evidence not (...)
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  42.  38
    Testimony and Narrative as a Political Relation: The Question of Ethical Judgment in Education.Rebecca Adami & Marie Hållander - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (1):1-13.
    In this article, we explore the role of film in educational settings and argue that testimony and narrative are dependent upon each other for developing ethical judgments. We use the film 12 Angry Men to enhance our thesis that the emotional response that sometimes is intended in using film as testimonies in classrooms requires a specific listening; a listening that puts pupils at risk when they relate testimonies to their own life narratives. The article raises the importance of listening in (...)
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  43. Being together, worlds apart: a virtual-worldly phenomenology.Rebecca A. Hardesty & Ben Sheredos - 2019 - Human Studies (3):1-28.
    Previous work in Game Studies has centered on several loci of investigation in seeking to understand virtual gameworlds. First, researchers have scrutinized the concept of the virtual world itself and how it relates to the idea of “the magic circle”. Second, the field has outlined various forms of experienced “presence”. Third, scholarship has noted that the boundaries between the world of everyday life and virtual worlds are porous, and that this fosters a multiplicity of identities as players identify both with (...)
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  44.  26
    Plato at the Googleplex: why philosophy won't go away.Rebecca Goldstein - 2014 - New York: Pantheon.
    From the acclaimed writer and thinker--whose award-winning books include both fiction and non-fiction--a dazzlingly original plunge into the drama of philosophy, revealing its hidden but essential role in today's debates on love, religion, politics, and science. Imagine that Plato came to life in the 21st century and set out on a multi-city speaking tour: How would he handle a host on Fox News who challenges him on religion and morality? How would he mediate a debate on the best way to (...)
  45. Respect for rational autonomy.Rebecca L. Walker - 2009 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (4):pp. 339-366.
    The standard notion of autonomy in medical ethics does not require that autonomous choices not be irrational. The paper gives three examples of seemingly irrational patient choices and discusses how a rational autonomy analysis differs from the standard view. It then considers whether a switch to the rational autonomy view would lead to overriding more patient decisions but concludes that this should not be the case. Rather, a determination of whether individual patient decisions are autonomous is much less relevant than (...)
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  46.  25
    Realism and children's early grasp of mental representation: belief-based judgements in the state change task.Rebecca Saltmarsh, Peter Mitchell & Elizabeth Robinson - 1995 - Cognition 57 (3):297-325.
  47.  11
    Genomic Research with the Newly Dead: A Crossroads for Ethics and Policy.Rebecca L. Walker, Eric T. Juengst, Warren Whipple & Arlene M. Davis - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (2):220-231.
    Research uses of human bodies maintained by mechanical ventilation after being declared dead by neurological criteria, were first published in the early 1980s with a renewed interest in research on the newly or nearly dead occurring in about last decade. While this type of research may take many different forms, recent technologic advances in genomic sequencing along with high hopes for genomic medicine, have inspired interest in genomic research with the newly dead. For example, the Genotype-Tissue Expression program through the (...)
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  48.  15
    Ethics briefing.Rebecca Mussell, Sophie Brannan, Veronica English, Caroline Ann Harrison & Julian C. Sheather - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (2):153-154.
    Health, ethics and COP27 On the 20 November 2022, the United Nations Climate Change COP27 announced a breakthrough agreement to provide ‘loss and damage’ funding for resource-poor countries seriously affected by climate change. 1 The establishment of the funding stream acknowledges, and attempts to address, one of many thorny ethical issues driven by climate change – to what extent countries that have benefited economically from past emissions of greenhouse gases owe reparative obligations to countries who have contributed minimally to climate (...)
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  49.  10
    Elisabeth of Bohemia (1618–1680): A Philosopher in her Historical Context Elisabeth of Bohemia (1618–1680): A Philosopher in her Historical Context, edited by Sabrina Ebbersmeyer and Sarah Hutton. Women in the History of Philosophy and Science, vol. 9. Springer Nature Switzerland AG, 2021, 218 pp., $64.99 (hb), ISBN 978-3-030-71526-7. [REVIEW]Rebecca Wilkin - 2024 - Intellectual History Review 34 (2):494-497.
    Sabrina Ebbersmeyer and Sarah Hutton have assembled a rich collection of essays on Elisabeth of Bohemia that were initially presented at a 2018 conference at the Center for the History of Women Phi...
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  50.  67
    To Tell the Truth, the Whole Truth, May Do Patients Harm: The Problem of the Nocebo Effect for Informed Consent.Rebecca Erwin Wells & Ted J. Kaptchuk - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (3):22-29.
    The principle of informed consent obligates physicians to explain possible side effects when prescribing medications. This disclosure may itself induce adverse effects through expectancy mechanisms known as nocebo effects, contradicting the principle of nonmaleficence. Rigorous research suggests that providing patients with a detailed enumeration of every possible adverse event—especially subjective self-appraised symptoms—can actually increase side effects. Describing one version of what might happen (clinical “facts”) may actually create outcomes that are different from what would have happened without this information (another (...)
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