Results for 'Radical Evil'

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  1. Radical Evil: A Philosophical Interrogation.Richard J. Bernstein - 2002 - Malden, MA: Polity.
    At present, there is an enormous gulf between the visibility of evil and the paucity of our intellectual resources for coming to grips with it. We have been flooded with images of death camps, terrorist attacks and horrendous human suffering. Yet when we ask what we mean by radical evil and how we are to account for it, we seem to be at a loss for proper responses. Bernstein seeks to discover what we can learn about the (...)
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  2. Is radical evil banal? Is banal evil radical?Paul Formosa - 2007 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (6):717-735.
    There has been much recent debate concerning how Hannah Arendt's concepts of radical evil and the banality of evil `fit together', if at all. I argue that the first of these concepts deals with a certain type of evil, in particular the evil that occurred in the Nazi death camps. The second deals with a certain type of perpetrator of evil, in particular the banal `nobody', Eichmann. As such, bar a localized incompatibility in regard (...)
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  3.  76
    Radical Evil As A Regulative Idea.Markus Kohl - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):641-673.
    Kant's doctrine of the radical evil in human nature invites at least two serious worries: first, it is unclear how Kant could establish the claim that all human beings adopt an evil maxim; second, this claim seems to conflict with central features of Kant's doctrine of freedom. I argue, via criticisms of various charitable interpretations, that these problems are indeed insuperable if we read Kant as trying to establish that all human beings are evil as a (...)
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  4.  37
    Radical evil and the invisibility of moral worth in Kant's die religion.Carlos Manrique - 2007 - Ideas Y Valores 56 (135):3-27.
    There is an aporia in Kant’s analysis of evil: he defines radical evil as an invisible disposition of the will, but he also demands an inferential connection between visible evil actions and this invisible disposition. This inference, however, undermines the radical invisibility of ra..
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  5. Kant on the radical evil of human nature.Paul Formosa - 2007 - Philosophical Forum 38 (3):221–245.
    In ‘Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason’ Kant presents his thesis that human nature is ‘radically evil’. To be radically evil is to have a propensity toward moral frailty, impurity and even perversity. Kant claims that all humans are ‘by nature’ radically evil. By presenting counter-examples of moral saints, I argue that not all humans are morally corrupt, even if most are. Even so, the possibility of moral failure is central to what makes us human.
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  6.  7
    Radical Evil, Social Contracts and the Idea of the Church in Kant.Jacqueline Mariña - 2022 - Kantian Review 27 (1):71-79.
    In this article I argue that Kant’s understanding of the universality of radical evil is best understood in the context of human sociality. Because we are inherently social beings, the nature of the human community we find ourselves in has a determinative influence on the sorts of persons we are, and the kinds of choices we can make. We always begin in evil. This does not vitiate responsibility, since through reflection we can become aware of our situation (...)
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  7. Kant, radical evil, and crimes against humanity.Sharon Anderson-Gold - 2009 - In Sharon Anderson-Gold & Pablo Muchnik (eds.), Kant's Anatomy of Evil. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  8.  13
    Radical Evil and the Scarcity of Hope: Postsecular Meditations.Martin Beck Matuštík - 2008 - Indiana University Press.
    No one will deny that we live in a world where evil exists. But how are we to come to grips with human atrocity and its diabolical intensity? Martin Beck Matuštík considers evil to be even more radically evil than previously thought and to have become all too familiar in everyday life. While we can name various moral wrongs and specific cruelties, Matuštík maintains that radical evil understood as a religious phenomenon requires a religious response (...)
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  9.  95
    Atheism, Radical Evil, and Kant.Dennis Vanden Auweele - 2010 - Philosophy and Theology 22 (1-2):155-176.
    This paper investigates the link between (radical) evil and the existence of God. Arguing with contemporary atheist thinkers, such as Richard Dawkins and Victor Stenger, I hold that one can take the existence of evil as a sign of the existence of God rather than its opposite. The work of Immanuel Kant, especially his thought on evil, is a fertile source to enliven this intuition. Kant implicitly seems to argue that because man is unable to overcome (...)
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  10. Radical evil in the Lockean state: The neglect of the political emotions.Martha Nussbaum - 2006 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (2):159-178.
    All modern liberal democracies have strong reasons to support an idea of toleration, understood as involving respect, not only grudging acceptance, and to extend it to all religious and secular doctrines, limiting only conduct that violates the rights of other citizens. There is no modern democracy, however, in which toleration of this sort is a stable achievement. Why is toleration, attractive in principle, so difficult to achieve? The normative case for toleration was well articulated by John Locke in his influential (...)
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  11.  4
    Adorno: Radical Evil as a Category of the Social.Peter Dews - 2008 - In The Idea of Evil. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 187–211.
    This chapter contains section titled: Notes.
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  12. Kant on Radical Evil and the Origin of Moral Responsibility.Irene McMullin - 2013 - Kantian Review 18 (1):49-72.
    The notion of radical evil plays a more important role in Kant's moral theory than is typically recognized. In Religion Within the Limits of Mere Reason, radical evil is both an innate propensity and a morally imputable act – a paradoxical status that has prompted commentators to reject it as inconsistent with the rest of Kant's moral theory. In contrast, I argue that the notion of radical evil accounts for the beginning of moral responsibility (...)
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  13.  7
    Kierkegaard and Kant on Radical Evil and the Highest Good: Virtue, Happiness, and the Kingdom of God.Roe Fremstedal - 2014 - Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.
    Kierkegaard and Kant on Radical Evil and the Highest Good is a major study of Kierkegaard's relation to Kant that gives a comprehensive account of radical evil and the highest good, two controversial doctrines with important consequences for ethics and religion.
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  14. Radical Evil: Between the Trivial and the Diabolical.Pablo Muchnik - 2001 - Contemporary Philosophy (3 & 4).
  15.  39
    Radical evil and banality of evil: Two faces of horror of totalitarian regimes from Hannah Arendt's perspective.Adolfo Jerónimo Botero & Yuliana Leal Granobles - 2013 - Universitas Philosophica 30 (60):99-126.
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  16. Radical Evil in Modernity: On Genocide, Totalitarian Terror and the Holocaust.Agnes Heller - 2010 - Thesis Eleven 101 (1):106-117.
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  17. 'Radical evil'revived-Hitler, Kant, Luther, neo-Lacanianism.Henry Staten - 1999 - Radical Philosophy 98:6-15.
  18.  77
    Fallen Freedom: Kant on Radical Evil and Moral Regeneration.Ronald M. Green - 1990 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    In this study Professor Michalson attempts to clarify the complex tangle of issues connected with Kant's doctrines of radical evil and moral regeneration, and to set the problems resulting from these doctrines in an interpretive framework that tries to make sense of the instability of his overall position. In his late work Religion Within the Limits of Reason Alone, Kant charts out these doctrines in a manner that represents a fresh development in his own thinking on moral and (...)
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  19.  21
    Radical Evil and Kant's Turn to Religion.Joseph P. Lawrence - 2002 - Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (2-3):319-335.
  20. RaDICal EvIl aND thE INvIsIBIlIty oF MoRal woRth IN KaNt's Die Religion.De Kant - 2007 - Ideas y Valores. Revista Colombiana de Filosofía 56 (135):3-27.
  21. Original Sin and Radical Evil: Kierkegaard and Kant.Roe Fremstedal - 2012 - Kantian Review 17 (2):197-225.
    By comparing the theories of evil found in Kant and Kierkegaard, this article aims to shed new light on Kierkegaard, as well as on the historical and conceptual relations between the two philosophers. The author shows that there is considerable overlap between Kant's doctrine of radical evil and Kierkegaard's views on guilt and sin and argues that Kierkegaard approved of the doctrine of radical evil. Although Kierkegaard's distinction between guilt and sin breaks radically with Kant, (...)
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  22.  1
    The Radical Evil in Human Nature.Charlene Haddock Seigfried - 1974 - In Gerhard Funke (ed.), Akten des 4. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses: Mainz, 6.–10. April 1974, Teil 2: Sektionen 1,2. De Gruyter. pp. 605-614.
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  23. Radical evil and the notion of conscience: a Buddhist meditation on Christian soteriology.Gananath Obeyesekere - 2019 - In William C. Olsen & Thomas J. Csordas (eds.), Engaging Evil: A Moral Anthropology. Berghahn Books.
     
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  24.  72
    Converting the Kantian Self: Radical Evil, Agency, and Conversion in Kant’s Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason.Samuel Loncar - 2013 - Kant Studien 104 (3):346-366.
    : This article argues that Kant’s doctrine of radical evil and the doctrine of conversion which is its consequent reflect developments in Kant’s thinking about moral agency and his realization that his theory of freedom was inadequate to the problem of moral evil; that the changes Kant makes to accommodate evil result in a significant though subterranean shift in his concept of agency, resulting in two incompatible concepts, one explicit but inadequate, the other implicit yet necessary; (...)
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  25.  15
    Radical Evil and the Ontological Difference Between Being and Beings.James Richard Mensch - 1988 - Philosophie Et Culture: Actes du XVIIe Congrès Mondial de Philosophie 4:487-492.
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  26.  35
    The reading of radical evil in Kant proposed by Italo Mancini.Andrea Ciceri - 2011 - Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 103 (4):691-705.
    The contribution examines Italo Mancini'suggestion to reread Kant's radical evil in the light of a reconsideration of the scope of reason in Kant's philosophy of religion.
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  27.  7
    Kant’s Theory of Radical Evil and its Franciscan Forebears.Lydia Schumacher - 2023 - Neue Zeitschrift für Systematicsche Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 65 (2):113-133.
    This article argues that Kant’s famous theory of ‘radical evil’, according to which there is a natural propensity for evil as well as good in all human beings, has precedent in the medieval Franciscan intellectual tradition. In the early thirteenth century, members of this tradition, inspired by its founder Alexander of Hales, developed a novel account of free will, according to which the will is capable of choosing between equally legitimate options of good and evil. In (...)
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  28.  40
    The concept of radical evil.Adriano Correia - 2005 - Trans/Form/Ação 28 (2):83-94.
    The concept of radical evil appears in Kant's theory when he discusses the religion in the limits of the mere reason and aims explain the complex relationship between respect for the moral law and the self-love, for establish the motive of the action. By aiming identify the basis of human inclination to evil, Kant is faced with the trouble of have to put nature and freedom in connection. Despite of the concept of radical evil retain (...)
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  29.  9
    Homonymy and Amphiboly, or Radical Evil in Translation.Barbara Cassin & Alex Ling - 2022 - Journal of Continental Philosophy 3 (1):51-60.
    By Aristotle’s own admission, homonymy and amphiboly, or syntactic homonymy, are unlikely to be accidental features of the Greek language (nor of any language, nor of language as such), but rather a radical evil that can at best be subdued, through recourse to categories, for example. Or we could choose to follow the sophists and exploit it by aiming at an essentially sonorous consensus. But then such texts would constitute a radical evil for translation.
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  30.  94
    Autonomy and radical evil: a Kantian challenge to constitutivism.Wolfram Gobsch - 2019 - Philosophical Explorations 22 (2):194-207.
    Properly understood, Kant’s moral philosophy is incompatible with constitutivism. According to the constitutivist, being subject to the moral law cannot be a matter of free choice, and failure to c...
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  31.  79
    Kant's argument for radical evil.Stephen R. Grimm - 2002 - European Journal of Philosophy 10 (2):160–177.
  32.  3
    Kant on Radical Evil: A Pragmatic Reading.Anthony Rimai - 2021 - Tattva Journal of Philosophy 13 (1):63-76.
    One of the primary concerns of Immanuel Kant in his major works on philosophy of religion is the doctrine of radical evil. He was greatly perplexed by the conundrums of this doctrine. Although Kant claimed it to be a universal trait, he failed to give a formal proof supporting it. However, he asserted that the conducts of human beings are enough to demonstrate the nature of radical evil. The complexity of the doctrine is further fuelled by (...)
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  33.  16
    Autonomy and Radical Evil: Kant’s Ethical Transformation of Sin.Ingolf U. Dalferth - 2022 - The Monist 105 (3):350-368.
    The paper examines Kant’s idea of autonomy as well as his conception of radical evil against the background of the theological tradition relevant to him. It is shown that both of them can be understood as ethical secularizations of theological concepts—the freedom of God and the concept of original sin—and that in both cases the problems of the theological tradition reoccur.
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  34.  59
    Original Sin, Radical Evil and Moral Identity.Philip L. Quinn - 1984 - Faith and Philosophy 1 (2):188-202.
  35.  29
    Reflective Judgment and Radical Evil in Kant’s Religion.Samuel A. Stoner & Paul T. Wilford - 2021 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 60 (2):277-303.
    The Southern Journal of Philosophy, Volume 60, Issue 2, Page 277-303, June 2022.
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  36.  21
    Kant’s Argument for Radical Evil.Stephen R. Grimm - 2002 - European Journal of Philosophy 10 (2):160-177.
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  37.  14
    Chapter one. Terror and radical evil.Dana Villa - 1999 - In Politics, Philosophy, Terror: Essays on the Thought of Hannah Arendt. Princeton University Press. pp. 11-38.
  38. On Evils, Evil, Radical Evil and the Demonic.Agnes Heller - 2011 - Critical Horizons 12 (1):15-27.
    This article explores the problem of evil from a post-metaphysical position. Distinguishing between good and evil remains no less a pressing task in a world after the "death of God".
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  39. Radical Evil, Religion And Politics In Kant’s And Tischner’s Philosophy. [REVIEW]Adam Chmielewski - 2007 - Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia 2 (2):233-235.
  40.  55
    The foe, radical evil: Political theology in Immanuel Kant and Carl Schmitt.Wolfram Malte Fues - 2010 - Philosophical Forum 41 (1-2):181-204.
  41.  10
    Suicidal Terror, Radical Evil, and the Distortion of Politics and Law.Leora Bilsky - 2004 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 5 (1):131-161.
    One of the main characteristics of this phase of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is the resort by Palestinian groups to suicidal terror. This paper focuses on the unique nature of suicidal terror, since, I believe, it is this kind of terror that presents the most immanent threat to the foundations of politics and law in the free world. The article begins with a phenomenological exploration of the effect of suicidal terror on politics in Israel, inspired by the work of Hannah Arendt. (...)
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  42.  5
    2. Kant and Radical Evil.John W. Burbidge - 1996 - In The God Within: Kant, Schelling, and Historicity. University of Toronto Press. pp. 20-33.
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  43.  5
    Expansionist Interpretations of Radical Evil.Laura Papish - 2018 - In Violetta L. Waibel, Margit Ruffing & David Wagner (eds.), Natur Und Freiheit. Akten des Xii. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses. De Gruyter. pp. 2021-2028.
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  44. Immanuel Kant: Radical Evil.Erik M. Hanson - 2012 - In J. Feiser & B. Dowden (eds.), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  45.  3
    “Free Choice and Radical Evil: The Irrationalism of Kant's Moral Philosophy”.George di Giovanni - 1989 - Proceedings of the Sixth International Kant Congress, Eds. G. Funke and Th. M. Seebohm (The Pennsylvania State University, 1989) Vol. II/2, Pp. 311-325 2 (2):311-325.
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  46.  2
    The Literary Image of Radical Evil: A Philosophical Reading of Roberto Bolaño.Juan Carlos Donado - 2017 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 2017 (179):72-88.
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    Fallen Freedom: Kant on Radical Evil and Moral Regeneration.Mary Midgley - 1992 - Philosophical Quarterly 42 (166):114-118.
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  48.  4
    Fallen Freedom: Kant on Radical Evil and Moral Regeneration.Ronald M. Green - 1991 - Religious Studies 27 (4):563-565.
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  49.  3
    Conclusion: Between Evil and Radical Evil.Avishai Margalit - 2009 - In On Compromise and Rotten Compromises. Princeton University Press. pp. 175-198.
  50. Dialectic triumph over radical evil in Hegel philosophy of religion.S. Semplici - 1986 - Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 78 (4):595-605.
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