Results for 'Rachel Hall Buck'

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  1. Moving From Plagiarism Police to Integrity Coaches: Assisting Novice Students in Understanding the Relationship Between Research and Ownership.Rachel Hall Buck & Silvia Vaccino-Salvadore - 2021 - International Journal for Educational Integrity 17 (1).
    Much of the discourse surrounding plagiarism is one of fear—a fear of being caught and punished, but many plagiarism examples happen unintentionally as students struggle with a new language, new ideas, and new communities in tertiary education. Specifically, many students are challenged with the task of writing a research paper, which involves finding academic sources, reading those sources to answer a research question, and integrating direct quotations and paraphrasing. Because novice writers often struggle with these skills, what is a developmental (...)
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  2. “It Can Happen to You”: Rape Prevention in the Age of Risk Management.Rachel Hall - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (3):1-19.
    : This essay provides a critical analysis of rape prevention since the 1980s. I argue that we must challenge rape prevention's habitual reinforcement of the notion that fear is a woman's best line of defense. I suggest changes that must be made in the anti-rape movement if we are to move past fear. Ultimately, I raise the question of what, if not vague threats and scare tactics, constitutes prevention.
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  3.  11
    “It Can Happen to You”: Rape Prevention in the Age of Risk Management.Rachel Hall - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (3):1-19.
    This essay provides a critical analysis of rape prevention since the 1980s. I argue that we must challenge rape prevention's habitual reinforcement of the notion that fear is a woman's best line of defense. I suggest changes that must be made in the anti-rape movement if we are to move past fear. Ultimately, I raise the question of what, if not vague threats and scare tactics, constitutes prevention.
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  4.  15
    Cognitive Constraints on Constituent Order: Evidence From Elicited Pantomime.Matthew L. Hall, Rachel I. Mayberry & Victor S. Ferreira - 2013 - Cognition 129 (1):1-17.
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  5.  11
    “It Can Happen to You”: Rape Prevention in the Age of Risk Management.Rachel Hall - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (3):1-18.
    This essay provides a critical analysis of rape prevention since the 1980s. I argue that we must challenge rape prevention's habitual reinforcement of the notion that fear is a woman's best line of defense. I suggest changes that must be made in the anti-rape movement if we are to move past fear. Ultimately, I raise the question of what, if not vague threats and scare tactics, constitutes prevention.
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  6.  9
    “It Can Happen to You”: Rape Prevention in the Age of Risk Management.Rachel Hall - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (3):1-19.
  7.  39
    Investigating Constituent Order Change With Elicited Pantomime: A Functional Account of SVO Emergence.Matthew L. Hall, Victor S. Ferreira & Rachel I. Mayberry - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (5):943-972.
    One of the most basic functions of human language is to convey who did what to whom. In the world's languages, the order of these three constituents (subject [S], verb [V], and object [O]) is uneven, with SOV and SVO being most common. Recent experiments using experimentally elicited pantomime provide a possible explanation of the prevalence of SOV, but extant explanations for the prevalence of SVO could benefit from further empirical support. Here, we test whether SVO might emerge because (a) (...)
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  8.  32
    Telling the Patient's Story: Using Theatre Training to Improve Case Presentation Skills.Rachel R. Hammer, Johanna D. Rian, Jeremy K. Gregory, J. Michael Bostwick, Candace Barrett Birk, Louise Chalfant, Paul D. Scanlon & Daniel K. Hall-Flavin - 2011 - Medical Humanities 37 (1):18-22.
    A medical student's ability to present a case history is a critical skill that is difficult to teach. Case histories presented without theatrical engagement may fail to catch the attention of their intended recipients. More engaging presentations incorporate ‘stage presence’, eye contact, vocal inflection, interesting detail and succinct, well organised performances. They convey stories effectively without wasting time. To address the didactic challenge for instructing future doctors in how to ‘act’, the Mayo Medical School and The Mayo Clinic Center for (...)
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  9.  7
    “Make the Education of the Youths Our Own Education”: Plato's Laches, a Dialogue for Educators.Brandon Buck & Rachel Longa - 2020 - Educational Theory 70 (2):199-213.
  10. The Causal Economy Approach to Scientific Explanation.Laura Franklin-Hall - forthcoming - Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science.
    This paper sketches a causal account of scientific explanation designed to sustain the judgment that high-level, detail-sparse explanations—particularly those offered in biology—can be at least as explanatorily valuable as lower-level counterparts. The motivating idea is that complete explanations maximize causal economy: they cite those aspects of an event’s causal run-up that offer the biggest-bang-for-your-buck, by costing less (in virtue of being abstract) and delivering more (in virtue making the event stable or robust).
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  11.  10
    Plant Chromatin: Development and Gene Control.Guofu Li, Timothy C. Hall & Rachel Holmes-Davis - 2002 - Bioessays 24 (3):234-243.
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  12.  21
    Acceptability Judgments Still Matter: Deafness and Documentation.Matthew L. Hall, Rachel I. Mayberry & Victor S. Ferreira - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  13. Localization and Identification of Brain Microstructural Abnormalities in Paediatric Concussion.David Stillo, Ethan Danielli, Rachelle A. Ho, Carol DeMatteo, Geoffrey B. Hall, Nicholas A. Bock, John F. Connolly & Michael D. Noseworthy - 2021 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 15.
    In the United States, approximately 2.53 million people sustain a concussion each year. Relative to adults, youth show greater cognitive deficits following concussion and a longer recovery. An accurate and reliable imaging method is needed to determine injury severity and symptom resolution. The primary objective of this study was to characterize concussions with diffusion tensor imaging. This was performed through a normative Z-scoring analysis of DTI metrics, fractional anisotropy, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity, to quantify patient-specific injuries and identify commonly (...)
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  14.  27
    Evolution of the Stewardship Idea in American Country Life.Gene Wunderlich - 2004 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (1):77-93.
    Theological and secular concepts ofstewardship evolved markedly in the 20thcentury. During this period of evolution, theAmerican Country Life Association through itschurch, academic, farm organization, andgovernmental affiliations, served as a bridgingand bonding agent in developing the stewardshipidea. As in any evolutionary process, thestewardship concept was subjected to a broadarray of influences and characterized bynotable highlights such as the Lynn Smithcritique of the Judaeo-Christian ethic, theman-in-nature statement of Douglas John Hall,and the environmental concerns of ecologistsand philosophers of the post-Rachel Carson (...)
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  15.  12
    Martyrs on Commission: A Reformation Essay. [REVIEW]Lyle Estill - 1988 - Journal of Business Ethics 7 (10):797 - 799.
    Fiction. Although this story contains a measure of historical accuracy, any resemblance between the central character and a real person, or between the events of the story and real events, is entirely coincidental. The main purpose of this piece is to expand upon the notion of overload as one reason business people should not be burdened with moral responsibility. The overload argument is presented in a chapter of Business Ethics in Canada, edited by Deborah Poff and Wilfrid Waluchow (Prentice-Hall (...)
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  16.  36
    A Reverse Index of Greek Nouns and Adjectives. By C. D. Buck and W. Petersen. Pp. Xvii + 765. Chicago: University Press , 1945. £3. [REVIEW]L. J. D. Richardson, C. D. Buck & W. Petersen - 1948 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 68:163-163.
  17.  43
    God and Human Attitudes: James Rachels.James Rachels - 1971 - Religious Studies 7 (4):325-337.
    Kneeling down or grovelling on the ground, even to express your reverence for heavenly things, is contrary to human dignity.
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  18. Buck-Passing and the Right Kind of Reasons.Wlodek Rabinowicz & Toni Rønnow-Rasmussen - 2006 - Philosophical Quarterly 56 (222):114–120.
    The ‘buck-passing’ account equates the value of an object with the existence of reasons to favour it. As we argued in an earlier paper, this analysis faces the ‘wrong kind of reasons’ problem: there may be reasons for pro-attitudes towards worthless objects, in particular if it is the pro-attitudes, rather than their objects, that are valuable. Jonas Olson has recently suggested how to resolve this difficulty: a reason to favour an object is of the right kind only if its (...)
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  19. Buck-Passing About Goodness.John Skorupski - 2007 - In J. Josefsson D. Egonsson (ed.), Hommage à Wlodek. Philosophical Papers Dedicated to Wlodek Rabinowicz.
    Defends the buck-passing account of value from the wrong kind of reason objection by arguing that in the cases proposed there are no reasons to value the intuitively worthless object, but there are practical reasons to bring it about that one values it. Also extends the account to other evaluative concepts.
     
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  20.  44
    Rachel Laudan. Reviewed Work: The Rejection of Continental Drift Theory and Method in American Earth Science by Naomi Oreskes. [REVIEW]Rachel Laudan - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (2):343-345.
  21. Buck-Passing and the Wrong Kind of Reasons.Jonas Olson - 2004 - Philosophical Quarterly 54 (215):295–300.
    According to T.M. Scanlon's buck-passing account of value, to be valuable is not to possess intrinsic value as a simple and unanalysable property, but rather to have other properties that provide reasons to take up an attitude in favour of their owner or against it. The 'wrong kind of reasons' objection to this view is that we may have reasons to respond for or against something without this having any bearing on its value. The challenge is to explain why (...)
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  22.  1
    Das Bild: Theorie - Geschichte - Praxis.Matthias Bruhn - 2009 - Akademie Verlag.
    Wissen erzeugen, reflektieren und Verstehen fördern – Bilder haben vielfältige Funktionen. Ihr informativer Wert ist stark gewachsen, bildliche Kommunikation ist in Kunst, Unterhaltung oder Werbung ebenso relevant wie in den Naturwissenschaften oder der Philosophie. Das Studienbuch „Das Bild“ diskutiert die Fragen, was ein Bild ist, wie es verstanden, betrachtet oder erforscht werden kann, aber auch, welche politischen und ökonomischen Implikationen mit ihm verbunden sein können. Begrifflichkeiten und Betrachtungsweisen – Themen und Perspektiven Geschichte der Bildmedien und Bildfunktionen Bildforschung zwischen Hochkunst und (...)
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  23. The Buck-Passing Account of Value: Lessons From Crisp.S. Matthew Liao - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 151 (3):421 - 432.
    T. M. Scanlon's buck-passing account of value (BPA) has been subjected to a barrage of criticisms. Recently, to be helpful to BPA, Roger Crisp has suggested that a number of these criticisms can be met if one makes some revisions to BPA. In this paper, I argue that if advocates of the buck-passing account accepted these revisions, they would effectively be giving up the buck-passing account as it is typically understood, that is, as an account concerned with (...)
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  24. Resisting Buck-Passing Accounts of Prudential Value.Guy Fletcher - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 157 (1):77-91.
    This paper aims to cast doubt upon a certain way of analysing prudential value (or good for ), namely in the manner of a ‘buck-passing’ analysis. It begins by explaining why we should be interested in analyses of good for and the nature of buck-passing analyses generally (§I). It moves on to considering and rejecting two sets of buck-passing analyses. The first are analyses that are likely to be suggested by those attracted to the idea of analysing (...)
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  25. Buck-Passers' Negative Thesis.Mark Schroeder - 2009 - Philosophical Explorations 12 (3):341-347.
    Buck-passers about value accept two theses about value, a negative thesis and a positive. The negative thesis is that the fact that something is valuable is not itself a reason to promote or appreciate it. The positive thesis is that the fact that something is valuable consists in the fact that there are other reasons to promote or appreciate it. Buck-passers suppose that the negative thesis follows from the positive one, and sometimes insist on it as if it (...)
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  26. The Buck Passing Theory of Art.James O. Young - 2016 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 3 (4): 421-433.
    In Beyond Art (2014), Dominic Lopes proposed a new theory of art, the buck passing theory. Rather than attempting to define art in terms of exhibited or genetic featured shared by all artworks, Lopes passes the buck to theories of individual arts. He proposes that we seek theories of music, painting, poetry, and other arts. Once we have these theories, we know everything there is to know about the theory of art. This essay presents two challenges to the (...)
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  27. The Buck Passing Account of Value: Assessing the Negative Thesis.Philip Stratton-Lake - unknown
    The buck-passing account of value involves a positive and a negative claim. The positive claim is that to be good is to have reasons for a pro-attitude. The negative claim is that goodness itself is not a reason for a pro-attitude. Unlike Scanlon, Parfit rejects the negative claim. He maintains that goodness is reason-providing, but that the reason provided is not an additional reason, additional, that is, to the reason provided by the good-making property. I consider various ways in (...)
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  28. Buck-Passing Accounts of Value.Jussi Suikkanen - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (5):768-779.
    This paper explores the so-called buck-passing accounts of value. These views attempt to use normative notions, such as reasons and ought to explain evaluative notions, such as goodness and value . Thus, according to Scanlon's well-known view, the property of being good is the formal, higher-order property of having some more basic properties that provide reasons to have certain kind of valuing attitudes towards the objects. I begin by tracing some of the long history of such accounts. I then (...)
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  29. Linguistic Interventions and Transformative Communicative Disruption.Rachel Katharine Sterken - 2020 - In Herman Cappelen, David Plunkett & Alexis Burgess (eds.), Conceptual Engineering and Conceptual Ethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 417-434.
    What words we use, and what meanings they have, is important. We shouldn't use slurs; we should use 'rape' to include spousal rape (for centuries we didn’t); we should have a word which picks out the sexual harassment suffered by people in the workplace and elsewhere (for centuries we didn’t). Sometimes we need to change the word-meaning pairs in circulation, either by getting rid of the pair completely (slurs), changing the meaning (as we did with 'rape'), or adding brand new (...)
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  30. Still Rainin' Still Dreamin': Hall Anderson's Ketchikan.Hall Anderson - 2010 - University of Alaska Press.
  31.  81
    Epistemic Buck-Passing and the Interpersonal View of Testimony.Judith Baker & Philip Clark - 2018 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 48 (2):178-199.
    Two ideas shape the epistemology of testimony. One is that testimony provides a unique kind of knowledge. The other is that testimonial knowledge is a social achievement. In traditional terms, those who affirm these ideas are anti-reductionists, and those who deny them are reductionists. There is increasing interest, however, in the possibility of affirming these ideas without embracing anti-reductionism. Thus, Sanford Goldberg uses the idea of epistemic buck-passing to argue that even reductionists can accept the uniqueness of testimonial knowledge, (...)
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  32.  69
    Passing the Deontic Buck.Matt Bedke - 2011 - In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics, Volume 6. Oxford University Press. pp. 128.
    In this paper I explore buck passing analyses of deontic properties in terms of reasons. The preferred analysis is that the permissibility/impermissibility/optionality/requiredness/etc. of some agent's acting is to be couched in terms of reasons to respond in some way to that agent's action, or the prospect thereof. Along the way I try to accommodate supererogation, wrong kinds of reasons objections, and commonly accepted inferences in deontic logic.
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  33.  87
    Kant on Beauty and Biology: An Interpretation of the 'Critique of Judgment'.Rachel Zuckert - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Kant's Critique of Judgment has often been interpreted by scholars as comprising separate treatments of three uneasily connected topics: beauty, biology, and empirical knowledge. Rachel Zuckert's book interprets the Critique as a unified argument concerning all three domains. She argues that on Kant's view, human beings demonstrate a distinctive cognitive ability in appreciating beauty and understanding organic life: an ability to anticipate a whole that we do not completely understand according to preconceived categories. This ability is necessary, moreover, for (...)
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  34. Epistemic Injustice.Rachel McKinnon - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (8):437-446.
    There's been a great deal of interest in epistemology regarding what it takes for a hearer to come to know on the basis of a speaker's say-so. That is, there's been much work on the epistemology of testimony. However, what about when hearers don't believe speakers when they should? In other words, what are we to make of when testimony goes wrong? A recent topic of interest in epistemology and feminist philosophy is how we sometimes fail to believe speakers due (...)
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  35. Resisting the Buck-Passing Account of Value.Pekka Vayrynen - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 1:295-324.
    I first distinguish between different forms of the buck-passing account of value and clarify my target in other respects on buck-passers' behalf. I then raise a number of problems for the different forms of the buck-passing view that I have distinguished.
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  36. Brentano and the Buck-Passers.Sven Danielsson & Jonas Olson - 2007 - Mind 116 (463):511 - 522.
    According to T. M. Scanlon's 'buck-passing' analysis of value, x is good means that x has properties that provide reasons to take up positive attitudes vis-à-vis x. Some authors have claimed that this idea can be traced back to Franz Brentano, who said in 1889 that the judgement that x is good is the judgement that a positive attitude to x is correct ('richtig'). The most discussed problem in the recent literature on buckpassing is known as the 'wrong kind (...)
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  37.  51
    Hume's Morality: Feeling and Fabrication.Rachel Cohon - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    Rachel Cohon offers an original interpretation of the moral philosophy of David Hume, focusing on two areas.
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  38. Abandoning the Buck Passing Analysis of Final Value.Andrew E. Reisner - 2009 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (4):379 - 395.
    In this paper it is argued that the buck-passing analysis (BPA) of final value is not a plausible analysis of value and should be abandoned. While considering the influential wrong kind of reason problem and other more recent technical objections, this paper contends that there are broader reasons for giving up on buck-passing. It is argued that the BPA, even if it can respond to the various technical objections, is not an attractive analysis of final value. It is (...)
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  39.  89
    Repertoires: A Post-Kuhnian Perspective on Scientific Change and Collaborative Research.Rachel A. Ankeny & Sabina Leonelli - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 60:18-28.
  40.  19
    We Can Have Our Buck and Pass It, Too.Zöe Johnson King - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 14.
    Chapter 8 argues against the view that the moral rightness of an act is not a reason to perform it, and our reasons are instead the features that make the act right. Philosophers typically defend this view by noting that it seems redundant to take rightness to be an additional reason, once it has been acknowledged that the right-making features are already reasons. The author shows that this argument dramatically overgeneralizes, ruling out all cases in which two or more reasons (...)
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  41. Compunction, Buck-Passing, and Moral Reasons: Reply to Darwall.Dale Miller - manuscript
    In “’But It Would Be Wrong,’” Stephen Darwall advances a mixed view regarding “deontic buck-passing.” He holds that a wrong action’s “wrong-making features” are our reasons for reactive attitudes like blame; with respect to these reasons, the action’s wrongness “passes the buck” to these features. Yet the action’s being wrong is itself an additional reason for the agent not to do the action, Darwall contends, a “second-personal” moral reason. So with respect to reasons for action, the buck (...)
     
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  42.  70
    Two Treatises of Government.Roland Hall - 1966 - Philosophical Quarterly 16 (65):365.
  43.  75
    “On Indirect Speech Acts and Linguistic Communication: A Response to Bertolet”1: McGowan, Tam and Hall.Mary Kate McGowan, Shan Shan Tam & Margaret Hall - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (4):495-513.
    Suppose a diner says, 'Can you pass the salt?' Although her utterance is literally a question (about the physical abilities of the addressee), most would take it as a request (that the addressee pass the salt). In such a case, the request is performed indirectly by way of directly asking a question. Accordingly this utterance is known as an indirect speech act. On the standard account of such speech acts, a single utterance constitutes two distinct speech acts. On this account (...)
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  44.  32
    The Buck Stops Here: Why Universities Must Reclaim Business Ethics Education. [REVIEW]Diane L. Swanson - 2004 - Journal of Academic Ethics 2 (1):43-61.
    Given the groundswell of corporate misconduct, the need for better business ethics education seems obvious. Yet many business schools continue to sidestep this responsibility, a policy tacitly approved by their accrediting agency, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). Some schools have even gone so far as to cut ethics courses in the wake of corporate scandals. In this essay I discuss some reasons for this failure of business school responsibility and argue that top university officials must go (...)
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  45. Do Acquaintance Theorists Have an Attitude Problem?Rachel Goodman - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 96 (1):67-86.
    ABSTRACTThis paper is about the relevance of attitude-ascriptions to debates about singular thought. It examines a methodology reject this methodology, the literature lacks a detailed examination of its implications and the challenges faced by proponents and critics. I isolate an assumption of the methodology, which I call the tracking assumption: that an attitude-ascription which states that s Φ's that P is true iff s has an attitude, of Φ-ing, which is an entertaining of the content P. I argue that the (...)
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  46. Trans*Formative Experiences.Rachel McKinnon - 2015 - Res Philosophica 92 (2):419-440.
    What happens when we consider transformative experiences from the perspective of gender transitions? In this paper I suggest that at least two insights emerge. First, trans* persons’ experiences of gender transitions show some limitations to L.A. Paul’s (forthcoming) decision theoretic account of transformative decisions. This will involve exploring some of the phenomenology of coming to know that one is trans, and in coming to decide to transition. Second, what epistemological effects are there to undergoing a transformative experience? By connecting some (...)
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  47. The Epistemology of Propaganda.Rachel McKinnon - 2018 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 96 (2):483-489.
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  48.  25
    A Systematic Review of Empirical Bioethics Methodologies.Rachel Davies, Jonathan C. S. Ives & Michael Dunn - 2015 - BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):15.
    Despite the increased prevalence of bioethics research that seeks to use empirical data to answer normative research questions, there is no consensus as to what an appropriate methodology for this would be. This review aims to search the literature, present and critically discuss published Empirical Bioethics methodologies.
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  49.  30
    Bibliography of James Rachels.David Rachels - 2005 - The Journal of Ethics 9 (3-4):573-578.
  50.  18
    Essays by Stuart Rachels.Stuart Rachels - unknown
    Over the last fifty years, traditional farming has been replaced by industrial farming. Unlike traditional farming, industrial farming is abhorrently cruel to animals, environmentally destructive, awful for rural America, and wretched for human health. In this essay, I document those facts, explain why the industrial system has become dominant, and argue that we should boycott industrially produced meat. Also, I argue that we should not even kill animals humanely for food, given our uncertainty about which creatures possess a right to (...)
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