7 found
Order:
See also
Rachel Cristy
King's College London
  1.  68
    What Is ‘The Meaning of Our Cheerfulness’? Philosophy as a Way of Life in Nietzsche and Montaigne.R. Lanier Anderson & Rachel Cristy - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):1514-1549.
    Robert Pippin has recently raised what he calls ‘the Montaigne problem’ for Nietzsche's philosophy: although Nietzsche advocates a ‘cheerful’ mode of philosophizing for which Montaigne is an exemplar, he signally fails to write with the obvious cheerfulness attained by Montaigne. We explore the moral psychological structure of the cheerfulness Nietzsche values, revealing unexpected complexity in his conception of the attitude. For him, the right kind of cheerfulness is radically non-naïve; it expresses the overcoming of justified revulsion at calamitous aspects of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  8
    The Postulated Author of Art and Nature: Kant on Spinoza in the Third Critique.Rachel Cristy - 2018 - In Violetta L. Waibel, Margit Ruffing & David Wagner (eds.), Natur Und Freiheit. Akten des Xii. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses. De Gruyter. pp. 1599-1606.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  74
    “Being Just Is Always a Positive Attitude”: Justice in Nietzsche's Virtue Epistemology.Rachel Cristy - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (1):33-57.
    In the second of the UM, "On the Uses and Disadvantages of History for Life", Nietzsche delivers a rare and lengthy encomium to the traditional Platonic-Aristotelian virtue of justice. "In truth," he says, "no one has a greater claim to our veneration than he who possesses the drive to and strength for justice. For the highest and rarest virtues are united and concealed in justice as in an unfathomable ocean that receives streams and rivers from all sides and takes them (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  11
    Virtue and Community in Mark Alfano's Nietzsche's Moral Psychology.Rachel Cristy - 2020 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 51 (2):250.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  15
    Nietzsche's Culture of Humanity: Beyond Aristocracy and Democracy in the Early Period by Jeffrey Church. [REVIEW]Rachel Cristy - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):336-342.
    Jeffrey Church's book Nietzsche's Culture of Humanity is a flawed but nonetheless significant contribution to the still fairly scant Anglophone literature on Nietzsche's early works. The book argues for two major intertwined theses and a third, less central one. The first thesis is that Nietzsche distinguishes between two types or layers of culture: national culture, which Nietzsche characterizes in §1 of the first essay of UM as "unity of artistic style in all the expressions of the life of a people," (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  34
    Does Wine Have a Place in Kant’s Theory of Taste?Rachel Cristy - 2016 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 2 (1):36--54.
    Kant claims in the third Critique that one can make about wine the merely subjective judgment that it is agreeable but never the universally valid judgment that it is beautiful. This follows from his views that judgments of beauty can be made only about the formal (spatiotemporal) features of a representation and that aromas and flavors consist of formless sensory matter. However, I argue that Kant's theory permits judgments of beauty about wine because the experience displays a temporal structure: the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. The Will to Truth and the Will to Believe: Friedrich Nietzsche and William James Against Scientism.Rachel Cristy - 2018 - Dissertation, Princeton University
    My dissertation brings into conversation two thinkers who are seldom considered together and highlights previously unnoticed similarities in their critical responses to scientism, which was just as prevalent in the late nineteenth century as it is today. I analyze this attitude as consisting of two linked propositions. The first, which Nietzsche calls “the unconditional will to truth,” is that the aims of science, discovering truth and avoiding error, are the most important human aims; and the second is that no practice (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark