52 found
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  1. Situationism and Virtue Ethics on the Content of Our Character.Rachana Kamtekar - 2004 - Ethics 114 (3):458-491.
    In this article, I argue that the character traits conceived of and debunked by situationist social psychological studies have very little to do with character as it is conceived of in traditional virtue ethics. Traditional virtue ethics offers a conception of character far superior to the one under attack by situationism; in addition to clarifying the differences, I suggest ways in which social psychology might investigate character on the virtue ethics conception. Briefly, the so‐called character traits that the situationist experiments (...)
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  2.  29
    Plato's Moral Psychology: Intellectualism, the Divided Soul, and the Desire for Good.Rachana Kamtekar - 2017 - Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
    Rachana Kamtekar offers a new understanding of Plato's account of the soul and its impact on our living well or badly, virtuously or viciously. She argues that throughout the dialogues Plato maintains that human beings have a natural desire for our own good, and that actions and conditions contrary to this desire are involuntary.
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  3.  82
    Agent‐Regret and Accidental Agency.Rachana Kamtekar & Shaun Nichols - 2019 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 43 (1):181-202.
    Midwest Studies In Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  4.  81
    “False positive” emotions, responsibility, and moral character.Rajen A. Anderson, Rachana Kamtekar, Shaun Nichols & David A. Pizarro - 2021 - Cognition 214 (C):104770.
  5. Imperfect Virtue.Rachana Kamtekar - 1998 - Ancient Philosophy 18 (2):315-339.
  6.  76
    Plato's 'Republic': A Critical Guide.Mark L. Mcpherran, G. R. F. Ferrari, Rachel Barney, Julia Annas, Rachana Kamtekar & Nicholas D. Smith (eds.) - 2013 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Plato's Republic has proven to be of astounding influence and importance. Justly celebrated as Plato's central text, it brings together all of his prior works, unifying them into a comprehensive vision that is at once theological, philosophical, political and moral. The essays in this volume provide a picture of the most interesting aspects of the Republic, and address questions that continue to puzzle and provoke, such as: Does Plato succeed in his argument that the life of justice is the most (...)
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  7.  80
    The Soul’s (After-) Life.Rachana Kamtekar - 2016 - Ancient Philosophy 36 (1):115-132.
  8. A Companion to Socrates.Sara Ahbel-Rappe & Rachana Kamtekar (eds.) - 2006 - Malden, Mass.: Wiley-Blackwell.
    This volume presents a survey exploring the profound influence of Socrates on the history of Western philosophy. It also discusses the life of Socrates and key philosophical doctrines associated with him.
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  9.  93
    Aristotle contra Plato on the Voluntariness of Vice: The Arguments of Nicomachean Ethics 3.5.Rachana Kamtekar - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (1):57-83.
  10. Plato on the Attribution of Conative Attitudes.Rachana Kamtekar - 2006 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 88 (2):127-162.
    Plato’s Socrates famously claims that we want (bou9lesqai) the good, rather than what we think good (Gorgias 468bd). My paper seeks to answer some basic questions about this well-known but little-understood claim: what does the claim mean, and what is its philosophical motivation and significance? How does the claim relate to Socrates’ claim that we desire (e7piqumei=n)1 things that we think are good, which..
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  11. Speaking with the Same Voice as Reason: Personification in Plato's Psychology.Rachana Kamtekar - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 31:167-202.
  12. Knowing by likeness in empedocles.Rachana Kamtekar - 2009 - Phronesis 54 (3):215-238.
    Contrary to the Aristotelian interpretation of Empedocles' views about cognition, according to which all cognition, like perception, is due to the compositional likeness between subject and object of cognition, this paper argues that when Empedocles says that we know one thing 'by' another (e.g. earth by earth or love by love), he is characterizing analogical reasoning, an intellectual activity quite different from perception (which is explained by the fit between effluences and pores). The paper also explores the idea that strife (...)
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  13.  64
    Aidws in Epictetus.Rachana Kamtekar - 1998 - Classical Philology 93:136-160.
  14.  58
    What's the good of agreeing? Homonoia in Platonic politics.Rachana Kamtekar - 2004 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 26:131-70.
  15.  18
    Plato’s Scientific Feminism: Collection and Division in Republic V’s "First Wave".John Proios & Rachana Kamtekar - 2024 - In Sara Brill & Catherine McKeen (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Women and Ancient Greek Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 217-234.
    In Plato’s Republic, Socrates argues that in the ideal city women and men in the guardian class should receive the same education (451e–52a, 456d–57a) and do the same work (453b–56b); indeed, Socrates emphasizes that the highest office in the ideal city, of philosopher-rulers, will include philosopher-queens and not just philosopher-kings (540c). Socrates’ conclusions might be thought to recognize equality as a value, but in this chapter, we argue that the basis for assigning men and women the same work is a (...)
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  16.  55
    Studying Ancient Political Thought Through Ancient Philosophers: The Case of Aristotle and Natural Slavery.Rachana Kamtekar - 2016 - Polis 33 (1):150-171.
    This paper examines Aristotle’s view that there are natural slaves, able-bodied people who lack the capacity to deliberate about the good and bad in life, who are ideally suited to be ‘tools of action’ for practically intelligent masters. After reconstructing Aristotle’s reasoning for the view that there are natural slaves in Politics i, and proposing a philosophical motivation for his interest in natural slavery, the paper reflects on what this case suggests about scholarly engagement with the political views of ancient (...)
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  17. Plato on Education and Art.Rachana Kamtekar - 2008 - In Gail Fine (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Plato. Oxford University Press. pp. 336--359.
    The article resonates Plato's ideas on education and art. In the Apology, Socrates describes his life's mission of practicing philosophy as aimed at getting the Athenians to care for virtue; in the Gorgias, Plato claims that happiness depends entirely on education and justice; in the Protagoras and the Meno, he puzzles about whether virtue is teachable or how else it might be acquired; in the Phaedrus, he explains that teaching and persuading require knowledge of the soul and its powers, which (...)
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  18.  18
    Philosophical Rule from the Republic to the Laws 1 : Commentary on Schofield.Rachana Kamtekar - 1997 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 13 (1):242-254.
  19.  66
    Marcus Aurelius.Rachana Kamtekar - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  20.  77
    The Profession of Friendship.Rachana Kamtekar - 2005 - Ancient Philosophy 25 (2):319-339.
  21.  33
    The presuppositions of a skeptic.Rachana Kamtekar - 2019 - Comparative Philosophy 10 (2).
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  22.  22
    Plato's Euthyphro, Apology, and Crito: Critical Essays.Rachana Kamtekar, Mark McPherran, P. T. Geach, S. Marc Cohen, Gregory Vlastos, E. De Strycker, S. R. Slings, Donald Morrison, Terence Irwin, M. F. Burnyeat, Thomas C. Brickhouse, Nicholas D. Smith, Richard Kraut, David Bostock & Verity Harte - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Plato's Euthyrphro, Apology, andCrito portray Socrates' words and deeds during his trial for disbelieving in the Gods of Athens and corrupting the Athenian youth, and constitute a defense of the man Socrates and of his way of life, the philosophic life. The twelve essays in the volume, written by leading classical philosophers, investigate various aspects of these works of Plato, including the significance of Plato's characters, Socrates's revolutionary religious ideas, and the relationship between historical events and Plato's texts.
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  23. The Powers of Plato's Tripartite Psychology.Rachana Kamtekar - unknown
    There is a mystery right at the heart of Plato ’s famous doctrine of the three parts of the soul, as this doctrine is presented in the Republic, Phaedrus and Timaeus: just what is a soul ‘part’? Republic IV tells us a way to distinguish soul parts, namely by the Principle of Opposites : since ‘the same thing will not do or undergo opposites in the same respect, in relation to the same thing, at the same time’, whenever we find (...)
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  24.  8
    Relativization and Explanation: Two Responses to the Compresence of Opposites.Rachana Kamtekar - 2024 - In David Keyt & Christopher Shields (eds.), Principles and Praxis in Ancient Greek Philosophy: Essays in Ancient Greek Philosophy in Honor of Fred D. Miller, Jr. Springer Verlag. pp. 159-173.
    This paper describes two ways in which Plato addresses the compresence of opposites in appearances and shows how his treatment of the phenomenon is a response to Protagoras: (1) by relativizing the opposites so as to avoid making the contradictory claims that the same thing is characterized by F and not-F, and (2) by seeking the cause of the conflicting phenomena. Relativization, a rational strategy for avoiding contradiction which Plato inherits from Protagoras, enables the user to avoid refutation in a (...)
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  25. Law in Plato's Late Politics.Rachana Kamtekar & Rachel Singpurwalla - 2022 - In The Cambridge Companion to Plato. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 522-558.
    Throughout his political works, Plato takes the aim of politics to be the virtue and happiness of the citizens and the unity of the city. This paper examines the roles played by law in promoting individual virtue and civic unity in the Republic, Statesman, and Laws. Section 1 argues that in the Republic, laws regulate important institutions, such as education, property, and family, and thereby creating a way of life that conduces to virtue and unity. Section 2 argues that in (...)
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  26. What's the Good of Agreeing? Homonoia in Platonic Politics.Rachana Kamtekar - 2004 - In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Xxvi: Summer 2004. Oxford University Press.
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  27. Social Justice and Happiness in the Republic: Plato's Two Principles.Rachana Kamtekar - 2001 - History of Political Thought 22 (2):189-220.
    rally best suited’. One would ordinarily suppose social justice to concern not only the allocation of duties but also the distribution of benefits. I argue that this expectation is fulfilled not by Plato’s conception of social justice, but by the normative basis for it, Plato’s requirement of aiming at the happiness of all the citizens. I argue that Plato treats social justice as a necessary but not sufficient means to happiness that guarantees only the production of the greatest goods; ensuring (...)
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  28.  38
    Ancient virtue ethics An overview with an emphasis on practical wisdom.Rachana Kamtekar - 2013 - In Daniel C. Russell (ed.), The Cambridge companion to virtue ethics. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 29-48.
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  29.  27
    Two Concepts of Cause in Antiphon’s Second Tetralogy.Rachana Kamtekar & Shaun Nichols - 2022 - Phronesis 67 (4):383-407.
    Using a framework from recent metaphysics and philosophy of science, according to which we have two concepts of cause, producer and necessary condition, we investigate causal notions in Antiphon’s Second Tetralogy, which concerns the unintentional homicide of a boy by a javelin-throwing youth. The prosecution maintains that the youth, having produced the boy’s death, is legally responsible; the defense argues, first, that the youth is patient, not agent, of a missing-the-target, and second, that the boy’s death depends on his running (...)
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  30.  11
    The Politics of Plato's Socrates.Rachana Kamtekar - 2005 - In Sara Ahbel‐Rappe & Rachana Kamtekar (eds.), A Companion to Socrates. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 214–227.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction The Constitutional Debate Professionalizing Political Rule Consequences for Political Thought.
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  31.  41
    Platonic Pity, or Why Compassion Is Not a Platonic Virtue.Rachana Kamtekar - 2020 - In Olivier Renaut & Laura Candiotto (eds.), Emotions in Plato. Brill. pp. 308–329.
    From Socrates’ claim in the Apology that a good person cannot be harmed to Plato’s characterizations of virtue as godlikeness in later dialogues like the Theaetetus and Timaeus, Platonic virtue seems to be an ideal of invulnerability. One might conclude that Plato would not count as virtues some of the qualities of character that we count as virtues, such as a compassionate disposition or disposition to pity, insofar as such qualities require their possessor to be vulnerable in ways that the (...)
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  32. Brill Online Books and Journals.Rachana Kamtekar - 2009 - Phronesis 54 (3).
  33.  79
    Comments on Robert Adams, A theory of virtue: excellence in being for the good.Rachana Kamtekar - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 148 (1):147-158.
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  34.  40
    Colloquium 4: The Powers of Plato’s Tripartite Psychology.Rachana Kamtekar - 2009 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):127-162.
  35. Friendship in Plato's Politics.Rachana Kamtekar - 1995 - Dissertation, The University of Chicago
    Why did Plato conceive of the ideal community as a friendship? To answer this question, my dissertation begins by locating Plato's view of the role of friendship in politics within the context of contemporary Athenian ideological uses of the notion of friendship. With this background, it presents an interpretation of civic friendship in the Republic as an objectively specifiable relationship of mutual benefit and recognition. Against the view that Plato introduces the idea of friendship to provide virtuous people with a (...)
     
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  36.  46
    Good Feelings and Motivation: Comments on John Cooper “The Emotional Life of the Wise”.Rachana Kamtekar - 2005 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (S1):219-229.
  37. Introduction.Rachana Kamtekar - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy:1-12.
  38.  60
    Levels of Argument: A Comparative Study of Plato’s Republic and Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics.Rachana Kamtekar - 2016 - Ancient Philosophy 36 (1):214-221.
  39.  19
    Philosopher-rulers.Rachana Kamtekar - 2013 - In Frisbee Sheffield & James Warren (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Ancient Philosophy. New York: Routledge. pp. 199.
  40. Plato and the Pleonectic Conception Of Human Nature.Rachana Kamtekar - 2022 - In Karolina Hübner (ed.), Human: A History. Oxford University Press.
     
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  41.  27
    Plato’s Moral Psychology (PMP) distinguishes two theses that might be taken as foundational to Plato’s psychologizing.Rachana Kamtekar - 2021 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 103 (1):217-220.
  42.  16
    Replies to Lear, Meyer and Vasiliou.Rachana Kamtekar - 2021 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 103 (1):240-250.
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  43.  73
    Sex and Social Justice; Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach.Rachana Kamtekar & Martha Nussbaum - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (2):262.
    Readers of Sex and Social Justice will find in its essays fresh insights and powerful arguments on such varied topics as pornography, prostitution, gay rights, the tensions between feminist imperatives and respect for cultural and religious differences, the importance to feminism of considering how desires adjust to socially formed expectations, the relationship between narrative, mercy and justice, Kenneth Dover’s memoirs, and Richard Posner’s economic and evolutionary account of sexual behaviour. In her discussions of these highly charged topics, Nussbaum never gives (...)
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  44.  49
    The Brute Within: Appetitive Desire in Plato and Aristotle.Rachana Kamtekar - 2009 - Philosophical Review 118 (1):103-107.
  45.  18
    Virtue and happiness: essays in honour of Julia Annas.Rachana Kamtekar & Julia Annas (eds.) - 2012 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This special volume of Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy presents sixteen specially written essays on virtue and happiness, and the treatment of these topics by thinkers from the fifth century BC to the third century AD. It is published in honour of Julia Annas--one of the leading scholars in the field.
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  46.  23
    Virtue and Law in Plato and Beyond, by Julia Annas.Rachana Kamtekar - 2019 - Mind 128 (510):576-584.
    Virtue and Law in Plato and Beyond, by AnnasJulia. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. pp. 234.
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  47. 10. Peter Singer, One World: The Ethics of Globalization Peter Singer, One World: The Ethics of Globalization (pp. 634-638). [REVIEW]Wlodek Rabinowicz, Toni Rønnow‐Rasmussen, Douglas Lavin, Rachana Kamtekar, Joshua Gert, Elijah Millgram, David Copp & Stephen M. Gardiner - 2004 - Ethics 114 (3).
     
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  48.  93
    James Warren, Facing Death: Epicurus and His Critics. [REVIEW]Rachana Kamtekar - 2007 - Philosophical Review 116 (4):650-653.
    James Warren, Facing Death, Epicurus and his Critics. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2004. Pp. viii, 240. ISBN 0-19-925289-0. $45.00. Reviewed by Thornton Lockwood, Sacred Heart University Word count: 2152 words ------------------------------- To modern ears, the word Epicurean indicates an interest in fine dining. But at least throughout the early modern period up until the 19th century, Epicureanism was known less for its relation to food preparation and more so, if not scandalously so, for its doctrine about the annihilation of the human (...)
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  49.  25
    Heinaman (R.) (ed.) Plato and Aristotle's Ethics. Pp. xx + 191. Aldershot and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2003. Cased, £37.50. ISBN: 978-0-7546-3403-. [REVIEW]Rachana Kamtekar - 2008 - The Classical Review 58 (1):70-71.
  50.  36
    Lucretius and the transformation of greek wisdom. [REVIEW]Rachana Kamtekar - 2004 - Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):228-232.
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