Results for 'R. X. Magic Rock'

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  1.  2
    R. Kieckhefer Magic in the Middle Ages. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989. Pp. X + 219. ISBN 0-521-31202-7. Hardback, £20, $39.50; Paperback, £6.95, $9.95. [REVIEW]Roger French - 1990 - British Journal for the History of Science 23 (4):484-485.
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  2.  13
    E. R. Truitt. Medieval Robots: Mechanism, Magic, Nature, and Art. X + 255 Pp., Figs., Bibl., Index. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015. $55. [REVIEW]Wenrui Zhao - 2016 - Isis 107 (4):830-831.
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  3.  15
    E. R. Truitt, Medieval Robots: Mechanism, Magic, Nature, and Art. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015. Pp. X, 255; Many Color Plates. $55. ISBN: 978-0-8122-4697-1. [REVIEW]Ayhan Aytes - 2018 - Speculum 93 (3):918-919.
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  4.  21
    William R. Shea, The Magic of Numbers and Motion: The Scientific Career of René Descartes. Canton, Mass.: Science History Publications, 1991. Pp. X + 371. ISBN 0-88135-098-2. $54.95. [REVIEW]Andrew Pyle - 1993 - British Journal for the History of Science 26 (2):242-243.
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  5.  4
    Characterization of Rock Material by Point Load Strength Index Test and Direct Cut.Ernesto Patricio Feijoo Calle & Paúl Andrés Almache Rodríguez - 2021 - Minerva 2 (4):11-22.
    The objective of this work is to establish a relationship between the cutting time in rocks, determining a speed and the point load strength index test, Is, to characterize the rock in terms of resistance and avoid sending samples to laboratories. As a first stage, on andesite samples, 5 x 5 x 10 cm test tubes were made. After the elaboration they were subjected to cutting, using an electric floor cutter and the time was evaluated. This cut was made (...)
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  6.  33
    A Model with No Magic Set.Krzysztof Ciesielski & Saharon Shelah - 1999 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 64 (4):1467-1490.
    We will prove that there exists a model of ZFC+"c = ω 2 " in which every $M \subseteq \mathbb{R}$ of cardinality less than continuum c is meager, and such that for every $X \subseteq \mathbb{R}$ of cardinality c there exists a continuous function f: R → R with f[X] = [0, 1]. In particular in this model there is no magic set, i.e., a set $M \subseteq \mathbb{R}$ such that the equation f[M] = g[M] implies f = g (...)
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  7. The Problem of Fake News.M. R. X. Dentith - 2016 - Public Reason 8 (1-2):65-79.
    Looking at the recent spate of claims about “fake news” which appear to be a new feature of political discourse, I argue that fake news presents an interesting problem in epistemology. Te phenomena of fake news trades upon tolerating a certain indiference towards truth, which is sometimes expressed insincerely by political actors. Tis indiference and insincerity, I argue, has been allowed to fourish due to the way in which we have set the terms of the “public” epistemology that maintains what (...)
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  8. The Problem of Conspiracism.Matthew R. X. Dentith - 2018 - Argumenta 3 (2):327-343.
    Belief in conspiracy theories is typically considered irrational, and as a consequence of this, conspiracy theorists––those who dare believe some conspiracy theory––have been charged with a variety of epistemic or psychological failings. Yet recent philosophical work has challenged the view that belief in conspiracy theories should be considered as typically irrational. By performing an intra-group analysis of those people we call “conspiracy theorists”, we find that the problematic traits commonly ascribed to the general group of conspiracy theorists turn out to (...)
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  9. When Inferring to a Conspiracy Might Be the Best Explanation.Matthew R. X. Dentith - 2016 - Social Epistemology 30 (5-6):572-591.
    Conspiracy theories are typically thought to be examples of irrational beliefs, and thus unlikely to be warranted. However, recent work in Philosophy has challenged the claim that belief in conspiracy theories is irrational, showing that in a range of cases, belief in conspiracy theories is warranted. However, it is still often said that conspiracy theories are unlikely relative to non-conspiratorial explanations which account for the same phenomena. However, such arguments turn out to rest upon how we define what gets counted (...)
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  10. Expertise and Conspiracy Theories.M. R. X. Dentith - 2018 - Social Epistemology 32 (3):196-208.
    Judging the warrant of conspiracy theories can be difficult, and often we rely upon what the experts tell us when it comes to assessing whether particular conspiracy theories ought to be believed. However, whereas there are recognised experts in the sciences, I argue that only are is no such associated expertise when it comes to the things we call `conspiracy theories,' but that the conspiracy theorist has good reason to be suspicious of the role of expert endorsements when it comes (...)
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  11. Clearing Up Some Conceptual Confusions About Conspiracy Theory Theorizing.Martin Orr & M. R. X. Dentith - 2018 - In M. R. X. Dentith (ed.), Taking Conspiracy Theories Seriously. London: Rowman and Littlefield. pp. 141-153.
    Orr and Dentith argue that a recurrent problem in much of the wider academic literature on conspiracy theories is either conceptual confusion or a refusal to put theory before practice. Orr and Dentith show that a naive empiricism pervades much of the social science literature when it comes to these things called ‘conspiracy theories’ which not only runs at odds with the philosophical literature but also the general tenor of the social sciences over the latter part of the 20th Century (...)
     
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  12. The Applied Epistemology of Conspiracy Theories: An Overview.M. R. X. Dentith & Brian L. Keeley - 2018 - In David Coady & James Chase (eds.), Routledge Handbook on Applied Epistemology. Abingdon: Routledge. pp. 284-294.
    An overview of the current epistemic literature concerning conspiracy theories, as well as indications for future research avenues on the topic.
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  13. Secrecy and Conspiracy.Matthew R. X. Dentith & Martin Orr - 2017 - Episteme 15 (4):433-450.
    In the literature on conspiracy theories, the least contentious part of the academic discourse would appear to be what we mean by a “conspiracy”: a secretive plot between two or more people toward some end. Yet what, exactly, is the connection between something being a conspiracy and it being secret? Is it possible to conspire without also engaging in secretive behavior? To dissect the role of secrecy in con- spiracies – and thus contribute to the larger debate on the epistemology (...)
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  14.  5
    Relationships Between Lineal Fracture Intensity and Chemical Composition in the Marcellus Shale, Appalachian Basin.Keithan G. Martin, Liaosha Song, Payam Kavousi & Timothy R. Carr - 2019 - Interpretation 7 (4):SJ33-SJ43.
    Within mudrock reservoirs, brittle zones undergo failure during hydraulic stimulation, creating numerous artificial fractures which enable hydrocarbons to be liberated from the reservoir. Natural fractures in mudrock reduce the tensile strength of the host rock, creating planes of weaknesses that are hypothesized to be reactivated during hydraulic stimulation. Combined, brittleness and natural fractures contribute to creating more abundant and complex fracture networks during hydraulic stimulation. Research efforts toward quantifying rock brittleness have resulted in numerous mineral-/compositional-based indices, which are (...)
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  15. New Books. [REVIEW]R. X. Ware, C. V. Borst & C. H. Whiteley - 1972 - Mind 81 (323):469-479.
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  16. CAMPBELL, K. - "Body and Mind". [REVIEW]R. X. Ware - 1972 - Mind 81:469.
     
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  17. What is Fake News?M. R. X. Dentith - 2018 - University of Bucharest Review (2):24-34.
    Talk of fake news is rife in contemporary politics, but what is fake news, and how, if anything, does it differ from news which is fake? I argue that in order to make sense of the phenomenon of fake news, it is necessary to first define it and then show what does and does not fall under the rubric of ‘fake news’. I then go on to argue that fake news is not a new problem. Rather, if there is problem (...)
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  18. Taking Conspiracy Theories Seriously and Investigating Them.M. R. X. Dentith - 2018 - In Taking Conspiracy Theories Seriously. London: Rowman and Littlefield. pp. 217-225.
    In this concluding chapter Dentith presents a synthesis of the views on offer, arguing that the various philosophical, sociological and psychology theses defended in this section point towards a necessary reorientation of the literature, one which requires we purge public discourse of the pejorative aspects of the terms ‘conspiracy theory’ and ‘conspiracy theorist’ and, rather, engage with conspiracy theories as theories (like we do with theories in the Sciences and the Social Sciences) appraising them on their particular merits. Not just (...)
     
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  19. The Conspiracy Theory Theorists and Their Attitude Towards Conspiracy Theory—Introduction to Section Two.M. R. X. Dentith - 2018 - In Taking Conspiracy Theories Seriously. London: Rowman and Littlefield. pp. 73-77.
    An introduction to section two, which introduces and summarises two recent critiques of belief in conspiracy theories by social scientists, as well as introducing the various arguments in the section.
     
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  20. The Iniquity of the Conspiracy Inquirers.M. R. X. Dentith - 2019 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 8 (8):1-11.
    A reply to “Why ‘Healthy Conspiracy Theories’ Are (Oxy)morons” by Pascal Wagner-Egger, Gérald Bronner, Sylvain Delouvée, Sebastian Dieguez and Nicolas Gauvrit.
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  21.  16
    David R. Montgomery. The Rocks Don't Lie: A Geologist Investigates Noah's Flood. Xiv + 302 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. New York: W. W. Norton, 2012. $26.95. [REVIEW]Kennard B. Bork - 2013 - Isis 104 (4):828-829.
  22. In Defence of Particularism: A Reply to Stokes.Matthew R. X. Dentith - 2016 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 5 (11):27-33.
    A reply to Patrick Stokes' “Between Generalism and Particularism About Conspiracy Theory".
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  23. The Philosophy of Conspiracy Theory: Bringing the Epistemology of a Freighted Term Into the Social Sciences.M. R. X. Dentith - 2018 - In Joseph Uscinski (ed.), Conspiracy Theories and the People Who Believe Them. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 94-108.
    An analysis of the recent efforts to define what counts as a "conspiracy theory", in which I argue that the philosophical and non-pejorative definition best captures the phenomenon researchers of conspiracy theory wish to interrogate.
     
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  24.  83
    Debunking Conspiracy Theories.M. R. X. Dentith - 2021 - Synthese 198 (10):9897-9911.
    In this paper I interrogate the notion of `debunking conspiracy theories’, arguing that the term `debunk’ carries with it pejorative implications, given that the verb `to debunk’ is commonly understood as `to show the wrongness of a thing or concept’. As such, the notion of `debunking conspiracy theories’ builds in the notion that such theories are not just wrong but ought to be shown as being wrong. I argue that we should avoid the term `debunk’ and focus on investigating conspiracy (...)
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  25. Clearing Up Some Conceptual Confusions About Conspiracy Theory Theorising.Matthew R. X. Dentith & Martin Orr - 2017 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 6 (1):9-16.
    A reply to Gérald Bronner, Véronique Campion-Vincent, Sylvain Delouvée, Sebastian Dieguez, Nicolas Gauvrit, Anthony Lantian, and Pascal Wagner-Egger's piece, '“They” Respond: Comments on Basham et al.’s “Social Science’s Conspiracy-Theory Panic: Now They Want to Cure Everyone”.
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  26. Treating Conspiracy Theories Seriously: A Reply to Basham on Dentith.Matthew R. X. Dentith - 2016 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 5 (9):1-5.
    A response to Lee Basham's 'The Need for Accountable Witnesses: A Reply to Dentith'.
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  27.  55
    Conspiracy Theories, Quassim Cassam, 2019. Cambridge, Polity Press, Vii + 127 Pp, USD45 (Hb) USD12.95. [REVIEW]M. R. X. Dentith - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 37 (5):895-897.
  28. I'm Not a Conspiracy Theorist, But...Matthew R. X. Dentith - 2015 - Fortean Times (324):36-39.
    Typical analyses of belief in conspiracy theories have it that identifying as a conspiracy theorist is irrational. However, given that we know conspiracies occur, and theories about said conspiracies can be warranted, should we really be scared of the locution 'I'm a conspiracy theorist...'?
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  29. Conspiracy Theories and Their Investigator(S).R. X. Dentith Matthew - 2017 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 6 (4):4-11.
    A reply to Patrick Stokes' 'Reluctance and Suspicion'—itself a reply to an early piece by myself replying to Stokes—in which I clarify what it is I intend when talking about how we should investigate conspiracy theories.
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  30. Between Forteana and Skepticism. [REVIEW]M. R. X. Dentith - 2018 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 7 (11):48-52.
    A review of Bernard Will's "Believing Weird Things".
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  31. Politics, Deception, and Being Self-Deceived. [REVIEW]M. R. X. Dentith - 2019 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 8 (4):38-43.
    A review of Anna Elisabeth Galeotti's "Political Self-Deception".
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  32.  44
    Taking Account of Conspiracy Theorising.M. R. X. Dentith - 2019 - Colloquium.
    In this paper I both summarise the recent volume "Taking Conspiracy Theories Seriously" (Rowman and Littlefield, 2018) and argue as to why we should investigate conspiracy theories rather than assume they are false or irrational by definition.
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  33.  53
    C P R X - M. Hasitzka, M. Müller, B. Rom, W. Hameter, B. Palme, H. Täuber, J. Diethart, H. Harrauer, K. A. Worp: Corpus Papyrorum Raineri, Band X: Griechische Texte VII. 2 Vols. Pp. 181 ; 60 Black and White Plates . Vienna: Hollinek, 1986. Paper. [REVIEW]J. David Thomas - 1988 - The Classical Review 38 (01):125-126.
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  34.  14
    Taking Conspiracy Theories Seriously.Matthew R. X. Dentith (ed.) - 2018 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    The contributors to this volume argue that whilst there is a commonplace superstition conspiracy theories are examples of bad beliefs (and that the kind of people who believe conspiracy theories are typically irrational), many conspiracy theories are rational to believe: the members of the Dewey Commission were right to say that the Moscow Trials of the 1930s were a sham; Woodward and Bernstein were correct to think that Nixon was complicit in the conspiracy to deny any wrongdoing in the Watergate (...)
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  35.  39
    C P R X.J. David Thomas - 1988 - The Classical Review 38 (01):125-.
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  36. Mohan Matthen and R.X. Ware, Eds., Biology and Society. [REVIEW]Arthur Miller - 1996 - Philosophy in Review 16:115-117.
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  37. A (Naive) View of Conspiracy as Collective Action.M. R. X. Dentith - 2018 - Filosofia E Collettività 22:61-71.
    Conspiracies are, by definition, a group activity; to conspire requires two or more people working together towards some end, typically in secret. -/- Conspirators have intentions; this is borne out by the fact they want some end and are willing to engage in action to achieve. Of course, what these intentions are can be hard to fathom: historians have written a lot about the intentions of the assassins of Julius Caesar, for example; did they want to restore the Republic; was (...)
     
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  38. Introduction.M. R. X. Dentith - 2018 - In Taking Conspiracy Theories Seriously. London: Rowman and Littlefield.
    An introduction to section one, introducing the various arguments in the section, and the common features of the critique of Dentith’s paper, When inferring to a conspiracy theory might be the best explanation.
     
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  39. The Psychologists’ Conspiracy Panic: They Seek to Cure Everyone.M. R. X. Dentith & Dr Dr Lee Basham - 2018 - In Taking Conspiracy Theories Seriously. London: Rowman and Littlefield. pp. 79-93.
    Basham and Dentith argue that the danger of condemning both conspiracy theorists and their conspiracy theories in a democracy has grave consequences. They argue that we should encourage research into public concerns about influential institutions, especially in cases where a conspiracy has been alleged. Rather than dismiss conspiracy theorising, we should, encourage the politically crucial, historically proven gift of watchfulness in the citizen, and its sometimes necessary, proper and correct expression, conspiracy theory.
     
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  40. What Particularism About Conspiracy Theories Entails.M. R. X. Dentith - 2018 - In Taking Conspiracy Theories Seriously. London: Rowman and Littlefield. pp. 59-69.
    In What particularism about conspiracy theories entails Dentith responds to their critics and examines the case for a refined and revised thesis of Particularism, the argument that we should appraise individual and particular conspiracy theories rather than appraise them in light of our views of the class of conspiracy theories generally. Recent work in the Philosophy of Conspiracy Theories has presented challenges to Particularism simpliciter (or Naive Particularism). Dentith argues that by facing these challenges Particularism presents an even stronger case (...)
     
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  41.  18
    C P R X. [REVIEW]J. Thomas - 1988 - The Classical Review 38 (1):125-126.
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  42.  13
    R. Wilson Bryan. Magic and the Millennium. A Sociological Study of Religious Movements of Protest Among Tribal and Third-World Peoples. Xi and 547 Pages £6·50. [REVIEW]R. E. S. Tanner - 1974 - Religious Studies 10 (3):382.
  43. R. Nola . Relativism and Realism in Science. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1988. Pp. X + 299. ISBN 90-277-2647-7. £48.00. [REVIEW]R. G. A. Dolby - 1990 - British Journal for the History of Science 23 (3):337-337.
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  44.  11
    R. Koolmeister, T. Tallmeister, Ed. J. F. Kindstrand: An Index to Dio Chrysostomus. Pp. X + 481. Uppsala: Distributed by Almqvist & Wiksell, Stockholm 1981. Paper, Sw. Kr. 157. [REVIEW]A. R. R. Sheppard - 1983 - The Classical Review 33 (1):133-133.
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  45.  23
    R. Koolmeister, T. Tallmeister, Ed. J. F. Kindstrand: An Index to Dio Chrysostomus. (Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, Studia Graeca Upsaliensia, 17.) Pp. X + 481. Uppsala: Distributed by Almqvist & Wiksell, Stockholm 1981. Paper, Sw. Kr. 157. [REVIEW]A. R. R. Sheppard - 1983 - The Classical Review 33 (01):133-.
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  46.  12
    Biology and Society: Reflections on Methodology Mohan Matthen and R. X. Ware, Editors Canadian Journal of Philosophy Supplementary Volume 20 Calgary: University of Calgary Press, 1994, Vi + 308 Pp., $30.00. [REVIEW]Kim Sterelny - 1998 - Dialogue 37 (1):168-.
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  47.  12
    Towards a Behavioural Ecology of Obesity.Andrew D. Higginson, John M. McNamara & Sasha R. X. Dall - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  48.  4
    Case Studies in Bioethics: The Race for Medical School: An R X for Speed.Lewis Silverman, Ronald A. Carson & Robert M. Veatch - 1978 - Hastings Center Report 8 (2):18.
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  49.  3
    Magic, Reason and Experience: Studies in the Origin and Development of Greek Science.G. E. R. Lloyd - 1979 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a study of the origins and development of Greek science, focusing especially on the interactions of scientific and traditional patterns of thought from the sixth to the fourth centuries BC. The starting point is an examination of how certain Greek authors deployed the category of 'magic' and attacked magical beliefs and practices, and these attacks are related to their complex background in Greek medicine and speculative thought. In his second chapter Dr Lloyd outlines the development, and (...)
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  50. Magic, Reason and Experience.G. E. R. Lloyd - 1981 - Philosophy 56 (217):433-435.
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