Results for 'R. S. Augustine'

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  1.  20
    Confessions.R. S. Augustine & Pine-Coffin - 2019 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    "Williams's masterful translation satisfies (at last!) a long-standing need. There are lots of good translations of Augustine's great work, but until now we have been forced to choose between those that strive to replicate in English something of the majesty and beauty of Augustine's Latin style and those that opt instead to convey the careful precision of his philosophical terminology and argumentation. Finally, Williams has succeeded in capturing both sides of Augustine's mind in a richly evocative, impeccably (...)
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  2. S. Augustine's Confessions with the Continuation of His Life to the End Thereof, Extracted Out of Possidius, and the Father's Own Unquestioned Works. Translated Into English.Augustine, Possidius & H. R. - 1679 - [S.N.].
     
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  3.  27
    History of American Political Thought.John Agresto, John E. Alvis, Donald R. Brand, Paul O. Carrese, Laurence D. Cooper, Murray Dry, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Thomas S. Engeman, Christopher Flannery, Steven Forde, David Fott, David F. Forte, Matthew J. Franck, Bryan-Paul Frost, David Foster, Peter B. Josephson, Steven Kautz, John Koritansky, Peter Augustine Lawler, Howard L. Lubert, Harvey C. Mansfield, Jonathan Marks, Sean Mattie, James McClellan, Lucas E. Morel, Peter C. Meyers, Ronald J. Pestritto, Lance Robinson, Michael J. Rosano, Ralph A. Rossum, Richard S. Ruderman, Richard Samuelson, David Lewis Schaefer, Peter Schotten, Peter W. Schramm, Kimberly C. Shankman, James R. Stoner, Natalie Taylor, Aristide Tessitore, William Thomas, Daryl McGowan Tress, David Tucker, Eduardo A. Velásquez, Karl-Friedrich Walling, Bradley C. S. Watson, Melissa S. Williams, Delba Winthrop, Jean M. Yarbrough & Michael Zuckert - 2003 - Lexington Books.
    This book is a collection of secondary essays on America's most important philosophic thinkers—statesmen, judges, writers, educators, and activists—from the colonial period to the present. Each essay is a comprehensive introduction to the thought of a noted American on the fundamental meaning of the American regime.
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  4.  17
    Shakespeare's Last Plays: Essays in Literature and Politics.John E. Alvis, Glenn C. Arbery, David N. Beauregard, Paul A. Cantor, John Freeh, Richard Harp, Peter Augustine Lawler, Mary P. Nichols, Nathan Schlueter, Gerard B. Wegemer & R. V. Young - 2002 - Lexington Books.
    What were Shakespeare's final thoughts on history, tragedy, and comedy? Shakespeare's Last Plays focuses much needed scholarly attention on Shakespeare's "Late Romances." The work--a collection of newly commissioned essays by leading scholars of classical political philosophy and literature--offers careful textual analysis of Pericles, Prince of Tyre, Cymbeline, The Winter's Tale, The Tempest, All is True, and The Two Noble Kinsmen. The essays reveal how Shakespeare's thought in these final works compliments, challenges, fulfills, or transforms previously held conceptions of the playwright (...)
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  5.  19
    Augustin und das antike Rom. [REVIEW]G. S. R. - 1958 - Review of Metaphysics 11 (3):516-517.
    Rome, the author holds, is not only the symbol of a political empire and a world at peace but also of a definite image of man. As a consequence it became the focus of the controversy between humanistic and other worldly Christianity. The present work deals with Augustine's views on Rome as political symbol and as moral symbol.--R. G. S.
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  6. The Moral of the Story: Literature and Public Ethics.J. Patrick Dobel, Henry T. Edmondson Iii, Gregory R. Johnson, Peter Kalkavage, Judith Lee Kissell, Peter Augustine Lawler, Alan Levine, Daniel J. Mahoney, Will Morrisey, Pádraig Ó Gormaile, Paul C. Peterson, Michael Platt, Robert M. Schaefer, James Seaton & Juan José Sendín Vinagre (eds.) - 2000 - Lexington Books.
    The contributors to The Moral of the Story, all preeminent political theorists, are unified by their concern with the instructive power of great literature. This thought-provoking combination of essays explores the polyvalent moral and political impact of classic world literatures on public ethics through the study of some of its major figures-including Shakespeare, Dante, Cervantes, Jane Austen, Henry James, Joseph Conrad, Robert Penn Warren, and Dostoevsky. Positing the uniqueness of literature's ability to promote dialogue on salient moral and intellectual virtues, (...)
     
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  7.  21
    The Mystical Theology of St. Bernard. [REVIEW]G. S. R. - 1956 - Review of Metaphysics 9 (4):703-703.
    This book, first published in 1940, accomplishes three tasks: 1) it gives a lucidly fascinating account of the theology underlying St. Bernard's diagnosis of man's condition and the cure proposed by him--monastic asceticism leading to mystical union; 2) it rectifies misinterpretations of St. Bernard's doctrine of carnal love as the first step to pure love; and 3) it uncovers the major sources of this system of theology: Cicero, Augustine, the Epistle of St. John, Dionysius and the Rule of St. (...)
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  8.  12
    Augustine’s Exegesis ad litteram.R. N. Hebb - 2007 - Augustinian Studies 38 (2):365-379.
  9.  27
    St. Augustine's Early Theory of Man, A.D. 386-391.St. Augustine's Confessions: The Odyssey of Soul.R. A. Markus - 1970 - Philosophical Quarterly 20 (80):269-270.
  10. Augustine; a collection of critical essays.R. A. Markus - 1972 - Garden City, N.Y.,: Anchor Books.
    Introduction, by R. A. Markus.--St. Augustine and Christian Platonism, by A. H. Armstrong.--Action and contemplation, by F. R. J. O'Connell.--St. Augustine on signs, by R. A. Markus.--The theory of signs in St. Augustine's De doctrina Christiana, by B. D. Jackson.--Si fallor, sum, by G. B. Matthews.--Augustine on speaking from memory, by G. B. Matthews.--The inner man, by G. B. Matthews.--On Augustine's concept of a person, by A. C. Lloyd.--Augustine on foreknowledge and free will, by (...)
     
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  11.  21
    Augustine’s Exegesis ad litteram.R. N. Hebb - 2007 - Augustinian Studies 38 (2):365-379.
  12.  42
    Inaugurating postcritical philosophy: A polanyian meditation on creation and conversion in Augustine's confessions.R. Melvin Keiser - 1987 - Zygon 22 (3):317-337.
    Michael Polanyi names Augustine as inaugurates of his “postcritical”philosophy. To understand what this means by exploring creation in the Confessions will clarify complex problems in Augustine and articulate theological implications in Polanyi. Specifically, it will show why an autobiographical account of conversion ends speaking of creation; how creation can thus be understood as “personal” language; how creation can be recovered in a time preoccupied with conversion; how conversion and creation are linked with incarnation, hermeneutics, and confessional rhetoric; and (...)
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  13. Augustine's Confessions: A study of spiritual maladjustment.Eric R. Dodds - 1927 - Hibbert Journal 26:459-473.
     
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  14.  47
    Sources of the Self.R. A. Sharpe - 1992 - Philosophical Quarterly 42 (167):234.
    'Most of us are still groping for answers about what makes life worth living, or what confers meaning on individual lives', writes Charles Taylor in Sources of the Self. 'This is an essentially modern predicament.' Charles Taylor's latest book sets out to define the modern identity by tracing its genesis, analysing the writings of such thinkers as Augustine, Descartes, Montaigne, Luther, and many others. This then serves as a starting point for a renewed understanding of modernity. Taylor argues that (...)
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  15. The role of neoplatonism in st. Augustine's de civitate Dei.R. Russell - 1981 - In A. H. Armstrong, H. J. Blumenthal & R. A. Markus (eds.), Neoplatonism and Early Christian Thought: Essays in Honour of A.H. Armstrong. Variorum Publications.
  16.  30
    Augustine’s Invention of the Inner Self: The Legacy of a Christian Platonist.G. R. Evans - 2001 - International Philosophical Quarterly 41 (3):373-374.
  17.  14
    Augustine and the Cure of Souls: Revising a Classical Ideal.Paul R. Kolbet - 2009 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    __Augustine and the Cure of Souls __situates Augustine within the ancient philosophical tradition of using words to order emotions. Paul Kolbet uncovers a profound continuity in Augustine's thought, from his earliest pre-baptismal writings to his final acts as bishop, revealing a man deeply indebted to the Roman past and yet distinctly Christian. Rather than supplanting his classical learning, Augustine's Christianity reinvigorated precisely those elements of Roman wisdom that he believed were slipping into decadence. In particular, Kolbet addresses (...)
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  18.  28
    St. Augustine’s Tears.Margaret R. Miles - 2020 - Augustinian Studies 51 (2):155-176.
    In St. Augustine’s society, men’s tears were not considered a sign of weakness, but an expression of strong feeling. Tears might be occasional, prompted by incidents such as those Augustine described in the first books of his Confessiones. Or they might accompany a deep crisis, such as his experience of conversion. Possidius, Augustine’s contemporary biographer, reported that on his deathbed Augustine wept copiously and continuously. This essay endeavors to understand those tears, finding, primarily but not exclusively (...)
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  19.  31
    VII—Emotions and the Category of Passivity.R. S. Peters & C. A. Mace - 1962 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 62 (1):117-142.
    R. S. Peters, C. A. Mace; VII—Emotions and the Category of Passivity, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Volume 62, Issue 1, 1 June 1962, Pages 117–142, h.
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  20.  7
    St. Augustine’s Last Desire.Margaret R. Miles - 2021 - Augustinian Studies 52 (2):135-160.
    In his last years, St. Augustine became impatient with the doctrinal questions and requests for advice on practical matters of ecclesiastical discipline frequently referred to in correspondence of his last decade. Scholars have often attributed his uncharacteristic reluctance to address these matters to the diminishing competence and energy of old age. This article demonstrates that his evident unwillingness to respond at length to such queries relates rather to his desire to sequester increased time for meditation. Throughout his Christian life, (...)
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  21. Husserl's Account of Our Consciousness of Time.James R. Mensch - 2010 - Marquette University Press. Edited by James Mensch.
    Having asked, “What, then, is time?” Augustine admitted, “I know well enough what it is, provided that nobody asks me; but if I am asked what it is and try to explain, I am baffled.” We all have a sense of time, but the description and explanation of it remain remarkably elusive. Through a series of detailed descriptions, Husserl attempted to clarify this sense of time. In my book, I trace the development of his account of our temporal self-awareness, (...)
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  22.  37
    Wainwright, Augustine and God’s Simplicity.Richard R. La Croix - 1979 - New Scholasticism 53 (1):124-127.
  23.  22
    Augustinus en het moderne denken.R. Bakker - 1974 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 36 (3):442 - 465.
    In this article we have tried to draw some connections between the philosophy of St Augustine and the phenomenology of Husserl and Heidegger. The occasion for our choosing this subject was the fact that on the next 13th November 1620 years have elapsed since Augustine's day of birth. The way Augustine approached the basic questions of human existence is closely related to contemporary phenomenological thought. This we will illustrate with the help of some notions as „memory” and (...)
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  24.  18
    Imagination and Metaphysics in St. Augustine. By Robert J. O'Connell, S.J. [REVIEW]R. W. Mulligan - 1987 - Modern Schoolman 65 (1):71-72.
  25.  21
    Still Waters Run Deep: A New Study of the Professores of Bordeaux.R. P. H. Green - 1985 - Classical Quarterly 35 (02):491-.
    Perhaps the most remarkable feature of the works in which Ausonius of Bordeaux and Libanius of Antioch, writing within a few years of each other, recall their long and varied careers is that there is so little resemblance between them; the impressions given by these experienced and successful teachers could hardly be more disparate. The reader of Ausonius finds in his Protrepticus a familiar enough picture of the terrors of the schoolroom; his Professores offer at first sight a series of (...)
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  26.  20
    Still Waters Run Deep: A New Study of the Professores of Bordeaux.R. P. H. Green - 1985 - Classical Quarterly 35 (2):491-506.
    Perhaps the most remarkable feature of the works in which Ausonius of Bordeaux and Libanius of Antioch, writing within a few years of each other, recall their long and varied careers is that there is so little resemblance between them; the impressions given by these experienced and successful teachers could hardly be more disparate. The reader of Ausonius finds in his Protrepticus a familiar enough picture of the terrors of the schoolroom; his Professores offer at first sight a series of (...)
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  27. Style esthdtique et lieu theologique.R. Court - 1997 - Recherches de Science Religieuse 85 (4):537-556.
    Quel lien y a-t-il entre le style, qui exprime un rapport au monde, et la théologie qui engage un rapport à Dieu ? Ce lien a été très fort dans le passé. À travers Augustin et le Pseudo-Denys, la pensée néoplatonicienne transmet au Moyen Âge le thème de la lumière intelligible. L’univers médiéval s’appréhende comme un cosmos transfiguré par la lumière de Dieu qui s’irradie sur toutes choses. Les Sommes théologiques baignent dans ce même symbolisme lumineux. Cependant, la pensée scolastique, (...)
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  28.  22
    Charter of Christendom: The Significance of the "City of God".R. C. N. - 1962 - Review of Metaphysics 16 (1):167-167.
    A well-documented defense of the thesis that St. Augustine held the city of man, especially Rome, to contain many relative goods, however evil it was from the absolute standpoint of goodness consisting in the worship of the true God. O'Meara discusses in some detail many contemporary critics, e.g., Ernest Barker, who oppose this interpretation, and argues on the basis of historical circumstance and Augustine's own declarations in works other than the City of God.--R. C. N.
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  29.  5
    Augustine and Wittgenstein.Kim Paffenroth, Alexander R. Eodice & John Doody (eds.) - 2018 - Lexington Books.
    This collection of essays focuses on Augustine’s relationship to Wittgenstein and critically examines the two in light of various philosophical connections between them. Its scope is intentionally broad in order to show that reading each of these philosophers through the lens of the other enhances our understanding of both.
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  30.  44
    Contingency and Fortune in Aquinas’s Ethics.John R. Bowlin - 1999 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    In this study John Bowlin argues that Aquinas's moral theology receives much of its character and content from an assumption about our common lot: the good we desire is difficult to know and to will, in particular because of contingencies of various kinds - within ourselves, in the ends and objects we pursue, and in the circumstances of choice. Since contingencies are fortune's effects, Aquinas insists that it is fortune that makes good choice difficult. Bowlin then explicates Aquinas's treatment of (...)
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  31.  6
    Augustine on Music: An Interdisciplinary Collection of Essays.Richard R. La Croix - 1988 - Edwin Mellen Press.
    An interdisciplinary collection of essays of some of the concepts central to Augustine's philosophy of art, largely ignored in previous works.
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  32.  10
    Augustine on Justifying Coercion.John R. Bowlin - 1997 - The Annual of the Society of Christian Ethics 17:49-70.
    Augustine encouraged Christian bishops and magistrates to coerce and constrain religious dissenters, he participated in these activities almost from the start of his career as presbyter under Valerius, and he offered justifications for what he did. Robert Markus and John Milbank consider Augustine's justifications inconsistent with the aspect of his social thought each admires most. Their conclusions are unwarranted and unnecessary. Augustine's justifications are neither inconsistent with the rest of his social thought, nor dependent upon judgments about (...)
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  33.  10
    Plato's Life and Thought : With a Translation of the Seventh Letter.R. S. Bluck - 2012 - Routledge.
    R. S. Bluck’s engaging volume provides an accessible introduction to the thought of Plato. In the first part of the book the author provides an account of the life of the philosopher, from Plato’s early years, through to the Academy, the first visit to Dionysius and the third visit to Syracuse, and finishing with an account of his final years. In the second part contains a discussion of the main purpose and points of interest of each of Plato’s works. There (...)
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  34.  26
    How St. Augustine Could Love the God in Whom He Believed.Margaret R. Miles - 2023 - Augustinian Studies 54 (1):23-42.
    St. Augustine, pictured by Western painters holding in his hand his heart blazing with passionate love, consistently and repeatedly insisted―from his earliest writings until close to his death―that the essential characteristic of God is “God is love” (1 John 4:16). Yet he also insisted on the doctrines of original sin and everlasting punishment for the massa damnata. This article will not explore the rationale or semantics of his arguments, nor the detail and nuance of the doctrines of predestination and (...)
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  35.  28
    Anti-Pelagian Polemic in Augustine’s De Continentia.Michael R. Rackett - 1995 - Augustinian Studies 26 (2):25-50.
  36.  29
    Achilles and Hector: The Homeric Hero (review).Bryan R. Warnick - 2006 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 40 (3):115-119.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Achilles and Hector: The Homeric HeroBryan R. WarnickAchilles and Hector: The Homeric Hero, by Seth Benardete. South Bend, IN: St. Augustine's Press, 2005, 140 pp., $17.00 cloth, $10.00 paper.Seth Benardete (1930-2001) was one of the twentieth century's premiere scholars of the classical world. His prominence was largely due to his technical excellence in both ancient philosophy and classical philology, a rare combination that allowed him to become, (...)
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  37.  3
    Introduction to the Philosophy of St. Augustine: Selected Readings and Commentaries. [REVIEW]J. W. R. - 1966 - Review of Metaphysics 19 (3):579-579.
    Mourant has provided a carefully edited, topically organized anthology. The introductions are clearly written. One still waits, however, for an Augustinian anthology which reveals, rather than conceals Augustine's development.—R. J. W.
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  38. St. Augustine on text and reality (and a little Gadamerian spice).Cynthia R. Nielsen - 2009 - Heythrop Journal 50 (1):98-108.
    One way of viewing the organizing structure of the Confessions is to see it as an engagement with various texts at different phases of St. Augustine’s life. In the early books of the Confessions, Augustine describes the disordered state that made him unable to read any text (sacred or profane) properly. Yet following his conversion his entire orientation— not only to texts but also to reality as a whole—changes. This essay attempts to trace the winding paths that lead (...)
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  39.  46
    The Chronology of Augustine’s Sermones ad populum III.Hubertus R. Drobner - 2004 - Augustinian Studies 35 (1):43-53.
    This article continues the discussion of dating Augustine’s sermons, using Augustine’s Christmas sermons (184–196 and 369–370) as the basis. It also includes an excursus, summarizing the status of present discussions and identifying the value and goal of this effort from a methodological perspective.
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  40.  22
    Intrinsic Moral Evils in the Middle Ages: Augustine as a Source of the Theological Doctrine.Matthew R. McWhorter - 2016 - Studies in Christian Ethics 29 (4):409-423.
    Contemporary historians examining moral theology in the Middle Ages question whether the practice of proscribing certain kinds of human acts as intrinsic moral evils has a legitimate basis in the Christian ethical tradition. John Dedek argues that this proscription does not fully emerge until the work of the fourteenth-century thinker Durandus of St. Pourçain. Dedek’s historical focus, however, is upon theological discussions which consider God’s absolute power and his ability to dispense from or command any human act whatsoever. The focus (...)
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  41. Elijah and Elisha: Expositions from the Book of Kings.R. S. WALLACE - 1957
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  42.  35
    Psalm 21 in Augustine’s Sermones ad populum.Hubertus R. Drobner - 2006 - Augustinian Studies 37 (2):145-169.
  43.  51
    The Chronology of St. Augustine’s Sermones ad populum II: Sermons 5 to 8.Hubertus R. Drobner - 2003 - Augustinian Studies 34 (1):49-66.
  44.  37
    The Chronology of St. Augustine’s Sermones ad populum.Hubertus R. Drobner - 2000 - Augustinian Studies 31 (2):211-218.
  45.  24
    Quand l’esprit « dit » le temps : la conscience du temps chez Aristote, Augustin et Husserl. On the Mind’s “Pronouncement” of Time: Aristotle, Augustine and Husserl on Time-consciousness.Michael R. Kelly - 2009 - Methodos 9.
    Cet essai met en cause la comparaison historique courante qui relie le traitement husserlien de la conscience du temps à la tradition philosophique occidentale par le biais du livre IX des Confessions d’Augustin. Je soutiens notamment que cette comparaison n’est valable qu’à l’égard des leçons sur le temps de 1905 (qui expliquent l’appréhension du temps par le recours à l’étirement de la conscience opéré par la mémoire) et non pour la théorie husserlienne ultérieure, que l’on peut dater autour de 1908 (...)
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  46.  33
    W. A. Sumruld: Augustine and the Arians. The Bishop of Hippo's Encounters with Ulfilan Arianism. Pp. 196. Selinsgrove, London, Toronto: Susquehanna University Press/Associated University Presses, 1994. Cased, £28. [REVIEW]R. P. H. Green - 1995 - The Classical Review 45 (02):469-.
  47.  11
    W. A. Sumruld: Augustine and the Arians. The Bishop of Hippo's Encounters with Ulfilan Arianism. Pp. 196. Selinsgrove, London, Toronto: Susquehanna University Press/Associated University Presses, 1994. Cased, £28. [REVIEW]R. P. H. Green - 1995 - The Classical Review 45 (2):469-469.
  48.  37
    Pride and Idolatry.R. R. Reno - 2006 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 60 (2):167-180.
    Which is the primal sin, pride or idolatry? The Augustinian tradition highlights pride, an emphasis reinforced by theological critiques of modernity. However, the Old Testament and Romans 1 point to idolatry as the fundamental form of sin. Analysis of Augustine's account of human acts, the nature of evil, and the structure of sinful love frames a close reading of one of the most famous episodes in his Confessions, the youthful theft of pears. In this autobiographical reflection, Augustine illuminates (...)
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  49. St. Augustine: Confessions. A new translation by R. S. Pine-Coffin. Pp. 347. West Drayton: Penguin Books, 1961. Paper, 5 s. net. [REVIEW]S. L. Greenslade - 1962 - The Classical Review 12 (03):312-.
  50.  25
    De Musica as the Guide to Understanding Augustine’s Trinitarian Numerology in the De Trinitate.Ellen R. Scully - 2013 - Augustinian Studies 44 (1):93-116.
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