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R. M. Sainsbury [89]R. Mark Sainsbury [2]
  1.  13
    Fiction and Fictionalism.R. M. Sainsbury - 2009 - New York: Routledge.
    Are fictional characters such as Sherlock Holmes real? What can fiction tell us about the nature of truth and reality? In this excellent introduction to the problem of fictionalism R. M. Sainsbury covers the following key topics: what is fiction? realism about fictional objects, including the arguments that fictional objects are real but non-existent; real but non-factual; real but non-concrete the relationship between fictional characters and non-actual worlds fictional entities as abstract artefacts fiction and intentionality and the problem of irrealism (...)
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  2. Concepts without boundaries.R. M. Sainsbury - 1996 - In Rosanna Keefe & Peter Smith (eds.), Vagueness: A Reader. MIT Press. pp. 186-205.
  3.  16
    Easy possibilities.R. M. Sainsbury - 1997 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (4):907-919.
  4. Paradoxes.R. M. Sainsbury - 1990 - Philosophy 65 (251):106-111.
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  5.  6
    Paradoxes.R. M. Sainsbury - 1991 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (2):455-459.
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  6.  3
    Russell.R. M. Sainsbury - 1979 - New York: Routledge.
    This book is available either individually, or as part of the specially-priced Arguments of the Philosphers Collection.
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  7.  4
    Easy Possibilities.R. M. Sainsbury - 1997 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (4):907-919.
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  8. Two ways to smoke a cigarette.R. M. Sainsbury - 2001 - Ratio 14 (4):386–406.
    In the early part of the paper, I attempt to explain a dispute between two parties who endorse the compositionality of language but disagree about its implications: Paul Horwich, and Jerry Fodor and Ernest Lepore. In the remainder of the paper, I challenge the thesis on which they are agreed, that compositionality can be taken for granted. I suggest that it is not clear what compositionality involves nor whether it obtains. I consider some kinds of apparent counterexamples, and compositionalist responses (...)
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  9.  17
    I—R. M. Sainsbury and Michael Tye: An Originalist Theory of Concepts.R. M. Sainsbury & Michael Tye - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):101-124.
    We argue that thoughts are structures of concepts, and that concepts should be individuated by their origins, rather than in terms of their semantic or epistemic properties. Many features of cognition turn on the vehicles of content, thoughts, rather than on the nature of the contents they express. Originalism makes concepts available to explain, with no threat of circularity, puzzling cases concerning thought. In this paper, we mention Hesperus/Phosphorus puzzles, the Evans-Perry example of the ship seen through different windows, and (...)
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  10. Intentionality without exotica.R. M. Sainsbury - 2010 - In Robin Jeshion (ed.), New Essays on Singular Thought. Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    The paper argues that intensional phenomena can be explained without appealing to "exotic" entities: one that don't exist, are merely possible, or are essentially abstract.
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  11.  5
    Truth and Objectivity.R. M. Sainsbury - 1996 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (4):899–904.
  12. Russell.R. M. SAINSBURY - 1979 - Philosophy 56 (216):271-273.
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  13.  15
    What is a vague object?R. M. Sainsbury - 1989 - Analysis 49 (3):99-103.
  14.  7
    Why the World Cannot be Vague.R. M. Sainsbury - 1995 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (S1):63-81.
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  15. Fiction and Acceptance-Relative Truth, Belief and Assertion.R. M. Sainsbury - 2010 - In Franck Lihoreau (ed.), Truth in Fiction. Ontos Verlag. pp. 38--137.
     
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  16.  23
    What logic should we think with?R. M. Sainsbury - 2002 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 51:1-17.
    Logic ought to guide our thinking. It is better, more rational, more intelligent to think logically than to think illogically. Illogical thought leads to bad judgment and error. In any case, if logic had no role to play as a guide to thought, why should we bother with it?The somewhat naïve opinions of the previous paragraph are subject to attack from many sides. It may be objected that an activity does not count as thinking at all unless it is at (...)
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  17.  3
    Degrees of Belief and Degrees of Truth.R. M. Sainsbury - 1986 - Philosophical Papers 15 (2-3):97-106.
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  18.  6
    Is There Higher-order Vagueness?R. M. Sainsbury - 1991 - Philosophical Quarterly 41 (163):167-182.
    I argue against a standard conception of classification, according to which concepts classify by drawing boundaries. This conception cannot properly account for "higher-order vagueness." I discuss in detail claims by Crispin Wright about "definitely," and its connection with higher-order vagueness. Contrary to Wright, I argue that the line between definite cases of red and borderline ones is not sharp. I suggest a new conception of classification: many concepts classify without drawing boundaries; they are boundaryless. Within this picture, there are no (...)
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  19.  15
    Projections and Relations.R. M. Sainsbury - 1998 - The Monist 81 (1):133-160.
    The paper evaluates Hume's alleged projectivism about causation and moral values.
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  20.  3
    Descartes.R. M. Sainsbury - 1987 - Philosophical Quarterly 37 (149):453-458.
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  21. Referring descriptions.R. M. Sainsbury - 2004 - In Marga Reimer & Anne Bezuidenhout (eds.), Descriptions and beyond. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 369--89.
     
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  22.  19
    Warrant‐Transmission, Defeaters and Disquotation.R. M. Sainsbury - 2000 - Philosophical Issues 10 (1):191-200.
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  23.  4
    The essence of reference.R. M. Sainsbury - 2006 - In Ernest LePore & Barry C. Smith (eds.), The Oxford Handbook to the Philosophy of Language. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    People use words and concepts to refer to things. There are agents who refer, there are acts of referring, and there are tools to refer with: words and concepts. Reference is a relation between people and things, and also between words or concepts and things, and perhaps it involves all three things at once. It is not just any relation between an action or word and a thing; the list of things which can refer, people, words and concepts, is probably (...)
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  24.  2
    Warrant-Transmission, Defeaters and Disquotation.R. M. Sainsbury - 2000 - Noûs 34 (s1):191 - 200.
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  25.  3
    Indexicals and Reported Speech.R. M. Sainsbury - 2004 - In T. J. Smiley & Thomas Baldwin (eds.), Studies in the philosophy of logic and knowledge. New York: Published for the British Academy by Oxford University Press. pp. 209.
  26.  20
    Russell on Acquaintance.R. M. Sainsbury - 1986 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lecture Series 20:219-244.
    In Russell's Problems of Philosophy (PP), acquaintance is the basis of thought and also the basis of empirical knowledge. Thought is based on acquaintance, in that a thinker has to be acquainted with the basic constituents of his thoughts. Empirical knowledge is based on acquaintance, in that acquaintance is involved in perception, and perception is the ultimate source of all empirical knowledge.
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  27. Philosophical Logic.R. M. Sainsbury - 2008 - In Dermot Moran (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Twentieth Century Philosophy. Routledge.
     
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  28. The Essence of Reference.R. M. Sainsbury - 2005 - In Ernie Lepore & Barry C. Smith (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Language. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
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  29. Meeting the Hare in her doubles : Causal belief and general belief.R. M. Sainsbury - 2005 - In Marina Frasca-Spada & P. J. E. Kail (eds.), Impressions of Hume. New York: Oxford University Press.
  30.  14
    Spotty scope.R. M. Sainsbury - 2006 - Analysis 66 (1):17-22.
  31.  21
    Russell on Acquaintance.R. M. Sainsbury - 1986 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lecture Series 20:219-244.
    In Russell's Problems of Philosophy (PP), acquaintance is the basis of thought and also the basis of empirical knowledge. Thought is based on acquaintance, in that a thinker has to be acquainted with the basic constituents of his thoughts. Empirical knowledge is based on acquaintance, in that acquaintance is involved in perception, and perception is the ultimate source of all empirical knowledge.
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  32.  8
    Understanding as immersion.R. M. Sainsbury - 2006 - Philosophical Issues 16 (1):246–262.
    Understanding has often been regarded as a kind of knowledge. This paper argues that this view is very implausible for understanding words. Instead, a proper account will be of the “analytic-genetic” variety: it will describe immersion in the practice of using a word in such a way that even those not previously equipped with the concepts the word expresses can become immersed. Meeting this condition requires attention to findings in developmental psychology. If you understand a declarative utterance, you thereby know (...)
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  33.  6
    Critical Notice.R. M. Sainsbury - 1985 - Mind 94 (373):120 - 142.
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  34.  17
    On a Fregean Argument for the Distinctness of Sense and Reference.R. M. Sainsbury - 1983 - Analysis 43 (1):12 - 14.
  35.  3
    Option negation and dialetheias.R. M. Sainsbury - 2004 - In Graham Priest, Jc Beall & Bradley P. Armour-Garb (eds.), The law of non-contradiction : new philosophical essays. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 85--92.
  36.  8
    Russell on constructions and fictions.R. M. Sainsbury - 1980 - Theoria 46 (1):19-36.
    Russell says that logical constructions are fictions. Does this show that he took them not to be real things?
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  37.  12
    Frege and Russell.R. M. Sainsbury - 1996 - In Nicholas Bunnin & Eric Tsui-James (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Philosophy. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 790–804.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Frege on Function, Concept and Object Sinn (Sense) and Bedeutung (Reference) Identity Statements and Bearerless Names: Russell's View of Names as Associated with Descriptions Names and Communication Russell's Theory of Descriptions Indirect Discourse Conclusion.
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  38.  6
    A Very Large Fly in the Ointment: Davidsonian Truth Theory Contextualized.R. M. Sainsbury - 2012 - In Richard Schantz (ed.), Prospects for Meaning. Walter de Gruyter. pp. 223-258.
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  39.  10
    Of Course there are Fictional Characters.R. M. Sainsbury - 2012 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 262 (4):615-630.
    I argue that there is no straightforward inference from there being fictional characters to any interesting form of realism. One reason is that “fictional” may be an intensional operator with wide scope, depriving the quantifier of its usual force. Another is that not all uses of “there are” are ontologically committing. A realist needs to show that neither of these phenomena are present in “There are fictional characters”. Other roads to realism run into difficulties when negotiating the role that presupposition (...)
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  40.  7
    Intensional Transitives and Presuppositions.R. M. Sainsbury - 2008 - Critica 40 (120):129-139.
    My commentators point to respects in which the picture provided in Reference without Referents is incomplete. The picture provided no account of how sentences constructed from intensional verbs can be true when one of the referring expressions fails to refer. And it gave an incomplete, and possibly misleading, account of how to understand certain serious uses of fictional names, as in "Anna Karenina is more intelligent than Emma Bovary" and "Anna Karenina does not exist". In the present response, I indicate (...)
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  41. Mind and Content.Simon Blackburn, R. M. Sainsbury & Mind Association - 1991 - Oxford University Press for the Mind Association.
     
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  42. The Sainsbury Discussion.Donald Davidson & R. M. Sainsbury - 1997 - Philosophy International.
     
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  43.  10
    Semantic Theory and Grammatical Structure.Barry Richards & R. M. Sainsbury - 1980 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 54 (1):133 - 172.
  44.  9
    Semantic Theory and Grammatical Structure.Barry Richards & R. M. Sainsbury - 1980 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 54 (1):133-172.
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  45.  4
    Evidence for Meaning.R. M. Sainsbury - 1986 - Mind and Language 1 (1):64-82.
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  46.  10
    Sameness and Difference of Sense.R. M. Sainsbury - 2004 - Philosophical Books 45 (3):209-217.
  47.  10
    Austerity and Openness.R. M. Sainsbury - 2006 - In Cynthia Macdonald & Graham Macdonald (eds.), Mcdowell and His Critics. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 6--1.
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  48.  4
    Austerity and Openness.R. M. Sainsbury - 2006 - In Cynthia Macdonald & Graham Macdonald (eds.), Mcdowell and His Critics. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 1–21.
    This chapter contains section titled: I II III.
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  49. A short history of theories of names.R. M. Sainsbury - 2005 - In R. M. Sainsbury (ed.), Reference Without Referents. Oxford, England and New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press UK.
    Sets out a short history of proper names, those paradigms of referring expressions. The starting point is Mill, and the history is traced through Frege, Russell, Kripke, and McDowell. In the final section, the theory to be defended in the book is briefly stated.
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  50.  4
    Benevolence and evil.R. M. Sainsbury - 1980 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 58 (2):128 – 134.
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