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Richard Lind [12]Richard W. Lind [8]Rebecca Ann Lind [5]Ranveig Lind [3]
R. Lind [1]R. E. Lind [1]Richard Walfred Lind [1]R. A. Lind [1]
  1.  19
    Public attitudes toward ethical issues in tv programming: Multiple viewer orientations.Rebecca Ann Lind & David L. Rarick - 1992 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 7 (3):133 – 150.
    Telephone survey of 293 TV viewers in Minneapolis-St. Paul investigated how viewers evaluate ethical issues and problematic content in TV news and entertainment programs, and attitudes toward methods of controlling TV content. In rating eight hypothetical news and entertainment scenarios, viewers appeared more willing to accept ethical breaches in entertainment than in news programs. In evaluating the severity of general problems in TV programming, most viewers considered violence, adult themes, and a lack of family values to be big problems. Different (...)
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  2.  20
    Intensive care nurses' involvement in the end-of-life process - perspectives of relatives.R. Lind, G. F. Lorem, P. Nortvedt & O. Hevroy - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (5):666-676.
    In this article, we report findings from a qualitative study that explored how the relatives of intensive care unit patients experienced the nurses’ role and relationship with them in the end-of-life decision-making processes. In all, 27 relatives of 21 deceased patients were interviewed about their experiences in this challenging ethical issue. The findings reveal that despite bedside experiences of care, compassion and comfort, the nurses were perceived as vague and evasive in their communication, and the relatives missed a long-term perspective (...)
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  3. Attention and the aesthetic object.Richard W. Lind - 1980 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 39 (2):131-142.
  4.  42
    Family involvement in the end-of-life decisions of competent intensive care patients.Ranveig Lind, Per Nortvedt, Geir Lorem & Olav Hevrøy - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (1):0969733012448969.
    In this article, we report the findings from a qualitative study that explored how relatives of terminally ill, alert and competent intensive care patients perceived their involvement in the end-of-life decision-making process. Eleven family members of six deceased patients were interviewed. Our findings reveal that relatives narrate about a strong intertwinement with the patient. They experienced the patients’ personal individuality as a fragile achievement. Therefore, they viewed their presence as crucial with their primary role to support and protect the patient, (...)
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  5.  42
    Assessing ethical sensitivity in television news viewers: A preliminary investigation.Rebecca Ann Lind & David L. Rarick - 1995 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 10 (2):69 – 82.
    Ethical sensitivity is a precursor to mora1 judgment in that a person must recognize the existence of an ethical problem before such a problem can be resolved. It is an important concept, yet it has received little attention from ethics scholars. This preliminary and exploratory study indicates that ethical sensitivity can be identified in viewers' reactions to and evaluations of ethically controversial television news stories, that diferent levels of ethical sensitivity are evident in discussions of television news stories, and that (...)
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  6. The aesthetic essence of art.Richard Lind - 1992 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 50 (2):117-129.
    There are good reasons to believe that "making a statement," in a broader sense than Danto's, is a "necessary" condition of art. But phenomenological analysis tends to show that an artwork must be "aesthetic" as well as meaningful. Otherwise, what the artist has to say could not be distinguished from many "non"artistic forms of communication. Moreover, its meaning must "subserve" the aesthetic function of the artwork, in a role best described as "significance"." "Art" must therefore be defined in terms of (...)
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  7.  37
    Cognitive maps assess news viewer ethical sensitivity.Rebecca Ann Lind & David L. Rarick - 1997 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 12 (3):133 – 147.
    ~Et h i c a l sensitivity is investigated in an illustrative analysis of two female television nezos viewers. Transcripts of structured, in-depth interviews were analyzed according to four critical content dimensions of ethical sensitivity reflecting interviewees' mentions of story characteristics, ethical issues, consequences, and stakeholders. Cognitive maps illustrate the reasoning processes ofthe two viewers, one with relatively high and the other with relatively low ethical sensitivity. This study provides a detailed description of a new application of a research procedure, (...)
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  8.  58
    Professionals' narratives of interactions with patients' families in intensive care.Anne M. Nygaard, Hege S. Haugdahl, Hilde Laholt, Berit S. Brinchmann & Ranveig Lind - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (4):885-898.
    Background: ICU patients’ family members are in a new, uncertain, and vulnerable situation due to the patient’s critical illness and complete dependence on the ICU nurses and physicians. Family members’ feeling of being cared for is closely linked to clinicians’ attitudes and behavior. Aim: To explore ICU nurses’ and physicians’ bedside interaction with critically ill ICU patients´ families and discuss this in light of the ethics of care. Research design: A qualitative study using participant observation, focus groups, and thematic narrative (...)
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  9. Care and justice in audience evaluations of ethics in TV news.R. A. Lind - 1996 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 11:82-94.
     
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  10.  13
    Must the critic be correct?Richard W. Lind - 1977 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 35 (4):445-456.
  11.  28
    Race and viewer evaluations of ethically controversial tv news stories.Rebecca Ann Lind - 1996 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 11 (1):40 – 52.
    Interviews with 111 African-American and European-Americans investigated racial differences in viewer evaluations of ethically controversial TV news stories. The study focused on judgments of whether three news stories (Genniger Flowers's alleged affair with Bill Clinton, a hit-and-run accident, and racial discrimination by Realtors) should be aired, the criteria applied in reaching those judgements, and the indications of reasons to attend to or to reject each story. No simple relationship was found between race and judgments of whether the stories should be (...)
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  12.  54
    The priority of attention: Intentionality for automata.Richard Lind - 1986 - The Monist 69 (October):609-619.
    IT is the major stumbling block to the claim that machines could one day possess true intelligence. The question is not whether machines would be able to produce outputs indistinguishable from those of a person, as proponents of “artificial intelligence” have traditionally maintained. Searle has shown, rather, that the real question is whether machines could ever be conscious of objects in the way we know ourselves to be. That would seem to make it, at least in part, a phenomenological problem. (...)
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  13.  34
    The Priority of Attention.Richard Lind - 1986 - The Monist 69 (4):609-619.
    IT is the major stumbling block to the claim that machines could one day possess true intelligence. The question is not whether machines would be able to produce outputs indistinguishable from those of a person, as proponents of “artificial intelligence” have traditionally maintained. Searle has shown, rather, that the real question is whether machines could ever be conscious of objects in the way we know ourselves to be. That would seem to make it, at least in part, a phenomenological problem. (...)
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  14. A microphenomenology of aesthetic qualities.Richard Lind - 1985 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (4):393-403.
    Microphenomenology (the refelctive reconstruction of attentional processes operative in perception) explicates the distinction between aesthetic and nonaesthetic qualities in a way that avoids traditional objections. aesthetic qualities are identified as phenomenal manifestations of a specific sort of spontaneous attentional event. particular aesthetic qualities are show to fall within any of six different categories of features attributable to this event. some aesthetic predicates strictly imply such features while others only 'suggest' them.
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  15.  18
    Art as Aesthetic Statement.Richard Lind - 1993 - The Journal of Aesthetic Education 27 (3):1.
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  16. Aesthetic'Sympathy'and Expressive Qualities.Richard W. Lind - 1988 - In Michael H. Mitias (ed.), Aesthetic Quality and Aesthetic Experience. Königshausen & Neumann. pp. 45--63.
     
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  17.  21
    A Micro-Phenomenology of Consonance and Dissonance.Richard Lind - 1997 - Journal of Philosophical Research 22:321-355.
    “Consonance” and “dissonance” can be shown to denote a syndrome of relative characteristics falling within three distinct dimensions of experience: 1) tension-repose, 2) pleasure-displeasure, 3) coherence-incoherence. There is a demonstrable, complex relationship between the specific degree of each of those characteristics associated with a particular tonal interval and the degree of complication of the ratio of that interval. No extant theory is able to explain that correlation, including the currently popular theory of psychological expectation. Using micro-phenomenology, I hypothesize that a (...)
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  18.  6
    A Micro-Phenomenology of Consonance and Dissonance.Richard Lind - 1997 - Journal of Philosophical Research 22:321-355.
    “Consonance” and “dissonance” can be shown to denote a syndrome of relative characteristics falling within three distinct dimensions of experience: 1) tension-repose, 2) pleasure-displeasure, 3) coherence-incoherence. There is a demonstrable, complex relationship between the specific degree of each of those characteristics associated with a particular tonal interval and the degree of complication of the ratio of that interval. No extant theory is able to explain that correlation, including the currently popular theory of psychological expectation. Using micro-phenomenology, I hypothesize that a (...)
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  19.  16
    A Phenomenological Definition of “Good”.Richard W. Lind - 1979 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 10 (1):107-115.
  20.  72
    Does the unconscious undermine phenomenology?Richard W. Lind - 1986 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 29 (1-4):325-344.
    According to Paul Ricoeur, the Freudian unconscious invalidates the ability of Husserlian phenomenology to explicate human psychology. The stumbling block is said to be the mechanism of repression, which can not only obviate conscious access to certain ideas and motives but also distort consciousness itself. The whole enterprise of phenomenology would seem to be at stake. But we must carefully distinguish being a conscious object from being a conscious process. By means of ?micro?phenomenology?, the reflective analysis of focal dynamics, I (...)
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  21.  35
    Historical origins of the modern mind/body split.R. E. Lind - 2001 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (1):23-40.
    It is argued that a radical relocation of subjectivity began several thousand years ago. A subjectivity experienced in the centric region of the heart, and in the body as a whole, began to be avoided in favor of the eccentric head as a new location of subjectivity. In ancient literature, for example in Homer's epics, the heart and various other bodily organs were described as centers of subjectivity and organs of perception for spiritual experience and communion with others and the (...)
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  22.  49
    Microphenomenology and Numerical Relations.Richard W. Lind - 1984 - The Monist 67 (1):29-45.
    The last two decades or so have borne witness to a modest revival of interest in the possibility that numerical relations are, at bottom, perceived properties or relations of some sort. In an earlier era writers as divergent as J. S. Mill and Edmund Husserl pursued just such a possibility, only to be swept out of the mathematical mainstream with a battery of broadsides from Gottlob Frege. Despite more recent arguments that numerical understanding is somehow derived from experience, however, no (...)
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  23.  29
    Measuring Sensitivity to Conflicts of Interest: A Preliminary Test of Method.Rebecca Ann Lind & Tammy Swenson-Lepper - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (1):43-62.
    This study presents and develops test methods for assessing sensitivity to conflict of interest (COIsen). We are aware of no study assessing COIsen, but note that some popular methods for assessing ethical sensitivity and related constructs (which include COIsen) are flawed in that their presentation of stimulus material to subjects actually guides subjects to attend to ethical (or related) issues. The method tested here was designed to avoid this flaw. Using adaptations of two existing cases, a quota sample of 12 (...)
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  24.  25
    Micro-phenomenology: Toward a hypothetico-inductive science of experience.Richard Lind - 1996 - International Philosophical Quarterly 36 (4):429-42.
  25.  6
    Micro-Phenomenology.Richard Lind - 1996 - International Philosophical Quarterly 36 (4):429-442.
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  26.  11
    Sense of responsibility in ICU end-of-life decision-making: Relatives’ experiences.Ranveig Lind - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301770369.
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  27.  12
    Towards a Phenomenological Metaethics.Richard W. Lind - 1983 - Philosophy Research Archives 9:639-663.
    Hany metaethicists have all but abandoned the possibility that ordinary value language has any sort of universal logic. But careful phenomenological reflection indicates that we call something “good” only if we tacitly believe that it is disposed to be “pragmatically attractive” in some way. Conversely, “bad” things must be “pragmatically repellent”. Linguistic and phenomenological evidence supports these observations. Differences in the meanings of diverse value judgments seem to be due to variations in the practical context in which the attraction or (...)
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  28.  3
    Towards a Phenomenological Metaethics.Richard W. Lind - 1983 - Philosophy Research Archives 9:639-663.
    Hany metaethicists have all but abandoned the possibility that ordinary value language has any sort of universal logic. But careful phenomenological reflection indicates that we call something “good” only if we tacitly believe that it is disposed to be “pragmatically attractive” in some way. Conversely, “bad” things must be “pragmatically repellent”. Linguistic and phenomenological evidence supports these observations. Differences in the meanings of diverse value judgments seem to be due to variations in the practical context in which the attraction or (...)
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  29.  21
    The case for micro-phenomenology.Richard Lind - 1993 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (4):622-625.
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  30.  6
    The Priority of Attention.Richard Lind - 1986 - The Monist 69 (4):609-619.
    IT is the major stumbling block to the claim that machines could one day possess true intelligence. The question is not whether machines would be able to produce outputs indistinguishable from those of a person, as proponents of “artificial intelligence” have traditionally maintained. Searle has shown, rather, that the real question is whether machines could ever be conscious of objects in the way we know ourselves to be. That would seem to make it, at least in part, a phenomenological problem. (...)
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  31.  28
    Why isn't minimal art Boring?Richard Lind - 1986 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 45 (2):195-197.
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