Results for 'R. I. Charles'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  90
    A phenomenological survey of auditory verbal hallucinations in the hypnagogic and hypnopompic states.Simon R. Jones, Charles Fernyhough & Frank Larøi - 2010 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (2):213-224.
    The phenomenology of auditory verbal hallucinations occurring in hypnagogic and hypnopompic states has received little attention. In a sample of healthy participants, 108 participants reported H&H AVHs and answered subsequent questions on their phenomenology. AVHs in the H&H state were found to be more likely to only feature the occasional clear word than to be clear, to be more likely to be one-off voices than to be recurrent voices, to be more likely to be voices of people known to the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  2.  40
    The Influence of Auditory Cues on Bodily and Movement Perception.Tasha R. Stanton & Charles Spence - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 10:3001.
    The sounds that result from our movement and that mark the outcome of our actions typically convey useful information concerning the state of our body and its movement, as well as providing pertinent information about the stimuli with which we are interacting. Here we review the rapidly growing literature investigating the influence of non-veridical auditory cues (i.e., inaccurate in terms of their context, timing, and/or spectral distribution) on multisensory body and action perception, and on motor behavior. Inaccurate auditory cues provide (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3. D Daehler, MW, 130,131,149,152, 153,155,156,157,172,183 Damasio, A., 88 Dattel, AR, 149,150,152,153,154.P. L. Cannon, H. W. Carmichael, C. S. Casey, R. Catrambone, R. I. Charles, V. M. Chase, P. W. Cheng, M. T. H. Chi, M. Chiu & K. N. Clayton - 1997 - In Lyn D. English (ed.), Mathematical reasoning: analogies, metaphors, and images. Mahwah, N.J.: L. Erlbaum Associates.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. .Michael I. Posner & Charles R. Snyder - 2004 - Psychology Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   91 citations  
  5. Attention and Cognitive Control.Michael I. Posner & Charles R. Snyder - 2004 - In Michael I. Posner & Charles R. Snyder (eds.). Psychology Press. pp. 205-223.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  27
    Comment on Flathman Difficulties With Flathman's Moderation Thesis: CHARLES R. BEITZ.Charles R. Beitz - 1984 - Social Philosophy and Policy 1 (2):172-175.
    Professor Flathman's main aim in this interesting paper is to set forth what we might call the “moderation thesis.” It holds that there may be occasions when the best thing to do, all things considered, is to violate a right – at least if the violation takes the form of what Flathman calls “civil encroachment” or “civil non-enforcement.” Moreover, it would be desirable, in a society whose practices include rights, for this belief to be generally accepted, so that those who (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Nihilism, Nietzsche and the Doppelganger Problem.Charles R. Pigden - 2007 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (5):441-456.
    Nihilism, Nietzsche and the Doppelganger Problem Was Nietzsche a nihilist? Yes, because, like J. L. Mackie, he was an error-theorist about morality, including the elitist morality to which he himself subscribed. But he was variously a diagnostician, an opponent and a survivor of certain other kinds of nihilism. Schacht argues that Nietzsche cannot have been an error theorist, since meta-ethical nihilism is inconsistent with the moral commitment that Nietzsche displayed. Schacht’s exegetical argument parallels the substantive argument (advocated in recent years (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  8. Logic and the autonomy of ethics.Charles R. Pigden - 1989 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 67 (2):127 – 151.
    My first paper on the Is/Ought issue. The young Arthur Prior endorsed the Autonomy of Ethics, in the form of Hume’s No-Ought-From-Is (NOFI) but the later Prior developed a seemingly devastating counter-argument. I defend Prior's earlier logical thesis (albeit in a modified form) against his later self. However it is important to distinguish between three versions of the Autonomy of Ethics: Ontological, Semantic and Ontological. Ontological Autonomy is the thesis that moral judgments, to be true, must answer to a realm (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  9. Geach on `good'.Charles R. Pigden - 1990 - Philosophical Quarterly 40 (159):129-154.
    In his celebrated 'Good and Evil' (l956) Professor Geach argues as against the non-naturalists that ‘good’ is attributive and that the predicative 'good', as used by Moore, is senseless.. 'Good' when properly used is attributive. 'There is no such thing as being just good or bad, [that is, no predicative 'good'] there is only being a good or bad so and so'. On the other hand, Geach insists, as against non-cognitivists, that good-judgments are entirely 'descriptive'. By a consideration of what (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  10.  35
    Are Conspiracy Theorists Epistemically Vicious?Charles R. Pigden - 2016 - In Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen, Kimberley Brownlee & David Coady (eds.), A Companion to Applied Philosophy. Malden, MA: Wiley. pp. 120–132.
    Are conspiracy theorists epistemically vicious? That is the conventional wisdom. It has distinguished supporters, including Quassim Cassam, Cass Sunstein and Adrian Vermeule. For me, a trait is an epistemic virtue if leads to the discovery of salient truths and the avoidance of pernicious falsehoods, and an epistemic vice the contrary. As such epistemic virtues and vices are role‐relative, context‐relative and end‐relative. I argue that that it is not necessarily or even usually vicious to be a conspiracy theorist, even if we (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  11. Conspiracy Theories, Deplorables, and Defectibility: A Reply to Patrick Stokes.Charles R. Pigden - 2018 - In Matthew R. X. Dentith (ed.), Taking Conspiracy Theories Seriously. Rowman & Littlefield International. pp. 203-215.
    Patrick Stokes has argued that although many conspiracy theories are true, we should reject the policy of particularism (that is, the policy of investigating conspiracy theories if they are plausible and believing them if that is what the evidence suggests) and should instead adopt a policy of principled skepticism, subjecting conspiracy theories – or at least the kinds of theories that are generally derided as such – to much higher epistemic standards than their non-conspiratorial rivals, and believing them only if (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  12. Identifying Goodness.Charles R. Pigden - 2012 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (1):93 - 109.
    The paper reconstructs Moore's Open Question Argument (OQA) and discusses its rise and fall. There are three basic objections to the OQA: Geach's point, that Moore presupposes that ?good? is a predicative adjective (whereas it is in fact attributive); Lewy's point, that it leads straight to the Paradox of Analysis; and Durrant's point that even if 'good' is not synonymous with any naturalistic predicate, goodness might be synthetically identical with a naturalistic property. As against Geach, I argue that 'good' has (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  13. Coercive Theories of Meaning or Why Language Shouldn't Matter (So Much) to Philosophy.Charles R. Pigden - 2010 - Logique Et Analyse 53 (210):151.
    This paper is a critique of coercive theories of meaning, that is, theories (or criteria) of meaning designed to do down ones opponents by representing their views as meaningless or unintelligible. Many philosophers from Hobbes through Berkeley and Hume to the pragmatists, the logical positivists and (above all) Wittgenstein have devised such theories and criteria in order to discredit their opponents. I argue 1) that such theories and criteria are morally obnoxious, a) because they smack of the totalitarian linguistic tactics (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  14.  12
    The Structure of Political Thought: A Study in the History of Political Ideas.N. R. McCoy Charles & M. Neumayr Thomas - 2017 - Routledge.
    Originally published in 1963, this classic book is a rethinking of the history of Western political philosophy. Charles N. R. McCoy contrasts classical-medieval principles against the "hypotheses" at the root of modern liberalism and modern conservativism. In Part I, "The Classical Christian Tradition from Plato to Aquinas," the author lays the foundation for a philosophical "structure" capable of producing "constitutional liberty." Part II, "The Modern Theory of Politics from Machiavelli to Marx," attempts to show, beginning with Machiavelli, the reversal (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. If not non-cognitivism, then what?Charles R. Pigden - 2010 - In Charles Pigden (ed.), Hume on Is and Ought. New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Taking my cue from Michael Smith, I try to extract a decent argument for non-cognitivism from the text of the Treatise. I argue that the premises are false and that the whole thing rests on a petitio principi. I then re-jig the argument so as to support that conclusion that Hume actually believed (namely that an action is virtuous if it would excite the approbation of a suitably qualified spectator). This argument too rests on false premises and a begged question. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  16.  52
    Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW]Steven I. Miller, Frank A. Stone, William K. Medlin, Clinton Collins, W. Robert Morford, Marc Belth, John T. Abrahamson, Albert W. Vogel, J. Don Reeves, Richard D. Heyman, K. Armitage, Stewart E. Fraser, Edward R. Beauchamp, Clark C. Gill, Edward J. Nemeth, Gordon C. Ruscoe, Charles H. Lyons, Douglas N. Jackson, Bemman N. Phillips, Melvin L. Silberman, Charles E. Pascal, Richard E. Ripple, Harold Cook, Morris L. Bigge, Irene Athey, Sandra Gadell, John Gadell, Daniel S. Parkinson, Nyal D. Royse & Isaac Brown - 1972 - Educational Studies 3 (1):1-28.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  22
    The identification of 100 ecological questions of high policy relevance in the UK.William J. Sutherland, Susan Armstrong-Brown, Paul R. Armsworth, Brereton Tom, Jonathan Brickland, Colin D. Campbell, Daniel E. Chamberlain, Andrew I. Cooke, Nicholas K. Dulvy, Nicholas R. Dusic, Martin Fitton, Robert P. Freckleton, H. Charles J. Godfray, Nick Grout, H. John Harvey, Colin Hedley, John J. Hopkins, Neil B. Kift, Jeff Kirby, William E. Kunin, David W. Macdonald, Brian Marker, Marc Naura, Andrew R. Neale, Tom Oliver, Dan Osborn, Andrew S. Pullin, Matthew E. A. Shardlow, David A. Showler, Paul L. Smith, Richard J. Smithers, Jean-Luc Solandt, Jonathan Spencer, Chris J. Spray, Chris D. Thomas, Jim Thompson, Sarah E. Webb, Derek W. Yalden & Andrew R. Watkinson - 2006 - Journal of Applied Ecology 43 (4):617-627.
    1 Evidence-based policy requires researchers to provide the answers to ecological questions that are of interest to policy makers. To find out what those questions are in the UK, representatives from 28 organizations involved in policy, together with scientists from 10 academic institutions, were asked to generate a list of questions from their organizations. 2 During a 2-day workshop the initial list of 1003 questions generated from consulting at least 654 policy makers and academics was used as a basis for (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18.  6
    Update on Waiving Informed Consent in Emergency Research.Charles R. McCarthy - 1995 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 5 (4):385-386.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Update on Waiving Informed Consent in Emergency ResearchCharles R. McCarthyMadam: The closing statement of my article on Waiving Informed Consent in Emergency Research published in the June 1995 issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal was: "No doubt we shall hear more of this issue."Indeed, we have heard much more on this issue. (1) In May 1995, after my article had already gone to press, the Food and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Hume, Newton, & Maclaurin.Charles R. Twardy - manuscript
    Paper presented to the Twenty-seventh Hume Society Conference, 26 July 2000, Williamsburg, Virginia. -/- At the time I thought there was a stronger link between Maclaurin and Hume, but in discussions at and after the meeting, decided Hume was not taking his mechanics out of Maclaurin’s Account. Although I still have found Maclaurin useful in interpreting Hume -- see Sapadin 1997 for a discussion of popular Newtonianism in Hume's day -- I suspect my draft suffers somewhat from ambivalence. There are (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  44
    The Romantic Realism of Michel Foucault Returning to Kant.Charles R. Varela - 2013 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 43 (2):226-245.
    Beatrice Han argues that the theories of subjection (determinism: structure) and subjectivation (freedom: agency) are the “the blind spot of Foucault's work:” to the very end of his life, in being transcendental and historical theories, respectively, they were in irresolvable conflict. In part I, I have argued that Foucault encourages us to situate the theories of the subject in an un-thematized reach for a metaphysics of realism which, in effect, was to ground his uncertain complementary reach for a naturalist conduct (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  52
    Father Richard J. Neuhaus, R.I.P.Charles Colson - 2009 - The Chesterton Review 35 (1/2):201-204.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. A 'Sensible Knave'? Hume, Jane Austen and Mr Elliot.Charles R. Pigden - 2012 - Intellectual History Review 22 (3):465-480.
    This paper deals with what I take to be one woman’s literary response to a philosophical problem. The woman is Jane Austen, the problem is the rationality of Hume’s ‘sensible knave’, and Austen’s response is to deepen the problem. Despite his enthusiasm for virtue, Hume reluctantly concedes in the EPM that injustice can be a rational strategy for ‘sensible knaves’, intelligent but selfish agents who feel no aversion towards thoughts of villainy or baseness. Austen agrees, but adds that ABSENT CONSIDERATIONS (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  7
    R. I. Aaron. Our knowledge of universale. Proceedings of the British Academy, vol. 31. Published also as a separate pamphlet by Humphry Milford, London1945, 28 pp. [REVIEW]Charles A. Baylis - 1950 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 14 (4):254-254.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  33
    The Romantic Realism of Michel Foucault The Scientific Temptation.Charles R. Varela - 2013 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 43 (1):1-22.
    Beatrice Han has argued that the theories of subjection (determinism: structure) and subjectivation (freedom: agency) are the “the blind spot[s] of Foucault's work.” Furthermore, she continues, as historical and transcendental theories, respectively, Foucault left them in a state of irresolvable conflict. In the Scientific Temptation I have shown that, as a practicing researcher, Foucault encourages us to situate the theories of the subject in the context of his un-thematized search for a metaphysics of realism, the purpose of which was to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  53
    Scott Soames: The analytic tradition in philosophy, volume 1: Founding giants: Princeton University Press.Charles R. Pigden - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (6):1671-1680.
    The Analytic Tradition in Philosophy is an excellent successor to an excellent book : It is a fine an example of the necromantic style in the history of philosophy where the object of the exercise is to resurrect the mighty dead in order to get into an argument with them, either because we think them importantly right or instructively wrong. However what was a pardonable a simplification and a reasonable omission in the earlier book has now metamorphosed into a sin (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  27
    R eflections on I ntellectual H istory S tatements 2010.David Katz, Michael Hunter, Theo Verbeek, Wilhelm Schmidt-Biggemann, Donald R. Kelley, Joseph Levine, Marta Fattori, Charles Webster & Constance Blackwell - 2010 - Intellectual History Review 16 (1):5-14.
  27.  4
    Review: R. I. Aaron, Our Knowledge of Universals. [REVIEW]Charles A. Baylis - 1950 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 14 (4):254-254.
  28.  10
    Leisure with dignity: essays in celebration of Charles R. Kesler.Michael Anton, Glenn Ellmers & Charles R. Kesler (eds.) - 2024 - New York: Encounter Books.
    Charles R. Kesler, an eminent scholar and prodigious editor, has exerted a profound influence on the study of American politics and the practice of American conservatism. A precocious high-school student, he impressed a visiting William F. Buckley Jr. who, before becoming a life-long friend, wrote him a recommendation letter to Yale. Kesler asked for another--to Harvard, where he completed his undergraduate degree and earned a PhD under the legendary professor Harvey C. Mansfield. An early passion for political journalism, played (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  54
    Book Reviews Section 3.James L. Jarrett, Walter P. Krolikowski, Charles R. Estes, Hugh C. Black, Charles S. Benson, John Lipkin, Gerald T. Kowitz, Anthony Scarangello, Langston C. Bannister, David N. Campbell, Christine C. Swarm, Steven I. Miller, David H. Ford, William J. Mathis, Don Kauchak, Paul R. Klohr, George W. Bright, Joyce Ann Rich, Edward F. Dash & Marvin Willerman - 1973 - Educational Studies 4 (3):155-168.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  9
    A History of Technology, II: The Mediterranean Civilization and the Middle Ages.Elias J. Bickerman, Garrett Mattingly, Charles Singer, E. J. Holmyard, A. R. Hall & Trevor I. Williams - 1958 - American Journal of Philology 79 (3):317.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  6
    A History of Technology, I: From Early Times to Fall of Ancient Empires.Elias J. Bickerman, Charles Singer, E. J. Holmyard & A. R. Hall - 1956 - American Journal of Philology 77 (1):96.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32.  11
    I. Charles Taylor'sHegel. [REVIEW]G. H. R. Parkinson - 1976 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 19 (1-4):255-266.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  33.  37
    An Impossible Awakening: Husserl and the Limits of Time‐Consciousness.Charles R. Driker-Ohren - 2022 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 60 (4):592-612.
    This article critiques Edmund Husserl’s account of affective awakening—the process mediating between one’s present perception of objects and their retrieval through memory. I argue that Husserl’s account of affective awakening is flawed and requires a rethinking of the relation between past and present. First, I reconstruct Husserl’s account of affection, the manner in which objects are given as prominent against a background and vie with one another for the ego’s attention. Next, I turn to affective awakening, through which a present (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  37
    Book Review Section 2. [REVIEW]Lynn Ilon, Alan J. Deyoung, Thomas R. Bidell, Sally Lubeck, Jean I. Erdman, Christine M. Shea, Anne E. Campbell, Kathryn A. Woolard, Bruce Beezer, Mario D. Fantini, Robert M. Ryan, D. D. Darland, Charles A. Tesconi Jr, Louis A. Petrone, Georgia C. Collins & Manning M. Pattillo Jr - 1987 - Educational Studies 18 (2):279-356.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. ‘‘Describing our whole experience’’: The statistical philosophies of W. F. R. Weldon and Karl Pearson.Charles H. Pence - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 42 (4):475-485.
    There are two motivations commonly ascribed to historical actors for taking up statistics: to reduce complicated data to a mean value (e.g., Quetelet), and to take account of diversity (e.g., Galton). Different motivations will, it is assumed, lead to different methodological decisions in the practice of the statistical sciences. Karl Pearson and W. F. R. Weldon are generally seen as following directly in Galton’s footsteps. I argue for two related theses in light of this standard interpretation, based on a reading (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  36. Charles Sanders Peirce, OEuvres I: Pragmatisme et pragmaticisme.R. Pouivet - forthcoming - Revue Internationale de Philosophie.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  13
    Eckart Menzler‐Trott. Logic's Lost Genius: The Life of Gerhard Gentzen. Translated by, Craig Smoryński and Edward Griffor. xxii + 441 pp., apps., bibl., index. Providence, R.I.: American Mathematical Society, 2007. $89. [REVIEW]Charles Parsons - 2009 - Isis 100 (2):424-425.
  38.  47
    Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW]Kenneth C. Schmidt, Philip G. Altbach, Bernard J. Kohlbrenner, Tom Zepper, Georgia I. Gudykunst, Donald A. Dellow, James Steve Counselis, James J. VanPatten, L. David Weller, C. H. Edson, W. Bruce Leslie, Maxine S. Seller, Charles R. Schindler, Cheryl G. Kasson, Fred D. Kierstead & Richard Quantz - 1981 - Educational Studies 12 (2):193-213.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  21
    J. R. Jayewardene of Sri Lanka: A Political Biography, Vol. I: 1906-1956.Charles Hallisey, K. M. de Silva & Howard Wriggins - 1990 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 110 (2):380.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  32
    Book Review Section 2. [REVIEW]Daniel P. Huden, Lewis E. Cloud, Frank P. Diulus, Charles J. Keene Jr, Georgia I. Gudykunst, John Spiess, Timothy G. Cooper, Richard W. Saxe, Donald R. Warren, Douglas E. Mitchell, Hilda Calabro, Mary Ann Lewis & Sally Schumacher - 1980 - Educational Studies 11 (3):276-294.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Notes from the Resistance: Some Comments on Sally Haslanger’s R esisting Reality.Charles W. Mills - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 171 (1):85-97.
    After a brief summary of the 17 essays in Sally Haslanger’s (2012) collection, Resisting Reality: Social Construction and Social Critique, I raise questions in two areas, the defense of constructionism and the definition of gender and race in terms of social oppression. I cite Robin Andreasen’s and Philip Kitcher’s essays arguing (in different ways) that races are both biologically real and socially constructed, and also Joshua Glasgow’s claim that constructionist arguments ultimately fail. I then cite Jennifer Saul’s critique that “oppression” (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  42.  27
    Punishment: A Philosophy and Public Affairs Reader.A. John Simmons, Marshall Cohen, Joshua Cohen & Charles R. Beitz (eds.) - 1994 - Princeton University Press.
    The problem of justifying legal punishment has been at the heart of legal and social philosophy from the very earliest recorded philosophical texts. However, despite several hundred years of debate, philosophers have not reached agreement about how legal punishment can be morally justified. That is the central issue addressed by the contributors to this volume. All of the essays collected here have been published in the highly respected journal Philosophy & Public Affairs. Taken together, they offer not only significant proposals (...)
  43.  35
    W.F.R. Weldon changes his mind.Charles H. Pence - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 11 (3):1-20.
    A recent debate over the causal foundations of evolutionary theory pits those who believe that natural selection causally explains long-term, adaptive population change against those who do not. In this paper, I argue that this debate – far from being an invention of several articles in 2002 – dates from our very first engagements with evolution as a quantified, statistical science. Further, when we analyze that history, we see that a pivotal figure in the early use of statistical methodology in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  37
    Encyclopedic Virgil - R.f. Thomas, J.m. Ziolkowski (edd.) The Virgil encyclopedia. Volume I: A–e, volume II: F–pe, volume III: Ph–z. With the assistance of A. bonnell-freidin, C. flow, and M.b. Sullivan. Pp. lxxvIII + 1525, b/w & colour pls. Malden, ma and oxford: Wiley–blackwell, 2014. Cased, £299, €358.80, us$495. Isbn: 978-1-4051-5498-7. [REVIEW]Charles Martindale - 2015 - The Classical Review 65 (1):124-128.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  11
    Das Prognosticon wurde nicht vor, sondern nach den Epidemienbüchern III und I verfasst: Zweiter Beitrag zur Chronologie der echten Hippokratischen Schriften. Charles LichtenthaelerMedecine et philosophie au temps d'Hippocrate. Bernard Vitrac.R. J. Hankinson - 1991 - Isis 82 (2):365-366.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  8
    Das Prognosticon wurde nicht vor, sondern nach den Epidemienbüchern III und I verfasst: Zweiter Beitrag zur Chronologie der echten Hippokratischen Schriften by Charles Lichtenthaeler; Medecine et philosophie au temps d'Hippocrate by Bernard Vitrac.R. Hankinson - 1991 - Isis 82:365-366.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  33
    Spinoza’s Ontological Argument.Charles E. Jarrett - 1976 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 6 (4):685 - 692.
    In this paper I will suggest an interpretation of Spinoza's ontological argument on which the argument, properly construed, is valid, and Spinoza, if granted the claim that it is possible that God exists, is successful in obtaining the conclusion of the argument. The interpretations given by H.A. Wolfson, G.H.R. Parkinson, and William A. Earle will then be argued to be deficient on textual and logical grounds. Leibniz’ assessment of the argument, namely that it “permits us only to conclude that God's (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  48.  5
    Studies in philosophy and psychology.Charles Edward Garman, James Hayden Tufts, Edmund Burke Delabarre, Frank Chapman Sharp, Arthur Henry Pierce & Frederick James Eugene Woodbridge (eds.) - 1906 - Boston and New York,: Houghton, Mifflin and company.
    Studies in philosophy: I. Tufts, J.H. On moral evolution. II. Willcos, W.F. The expansion of Europe in its influence upon population. III. Woods, R.A. Democracy a new unfolding of human power. IV. Sharp, F.C. An analysis of the moral judgment. V. Woodbridge, F.J.E. The problem of consciousness. VI. Norton, E.L. The intellectual element in music. VII. Raub, W.L. Pragmatism and Kantianism. VIII. Lyman, E.W. The influence of pragmatism upon the status of theology.--Studies in psychology: IX. Delabarre, E.B. Influence of surrounding (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  93
    The Early History of Chance in Evolution.Charles H. Pence - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 50:48-58.
    Work throughout the history and philosophy of biology frequently employs ‘chance’, ‘unpredictability’, ‘probability’, and many similar terms. One common way of understanding how these concepts were introduced in evolution focuses on two central issues: the first use of statistical methods in evolution (Galton), and the first use of the concept of “objective chance” in evolution (Wright). I argue that while this approach has merit, it fails to fully capture interesting philosophical reflections on the role of chance expounded by two of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  50.  95
    Jonathan Bennett on 'even if'.Charles B. Cross - 1985 - Linguistics and Philosophy 8 (3):353-357.
    I show that given Jonathan Bennett's theory of 'even if,' the following statement is logically true iff the principle of conditional excluded is valid: (SE) If Q and if P wouldn't rule out Q, then Q even if P. Hence whatever intuitions support the validity of (SE) support the validity of Conditional Excluded Middle, too. Finally I show that Bennett's objection to John Bigelow's theory of the conditional can be turned into a (perhaps) more telling one, viz. that on Bigelow's (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000