Results for 'R. E. Ewin'

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  1. R.E. Ewin, Virtues And Rights: The Moral Philosophy Of Thomas Hobbes. [REVIEW]Timo Airaksinen - 1992 - Philosophy in Review 12:100-101.
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  2. R. E. Ewin: "Liberty, Community and Justice". [REVIEW]John Burnheim - 1989 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 67:366.
  3.  21
    The Virtues Appropriate to Business.R. E. Ewin - 1995 - Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (4):833-842.
    Robert Solomon has presented a version of business ethics in terms of virtues theory. It is a good thing that business ethics should be understood in terms of virtues theory, but the account that Solomon gives is seriously misleading in important respects. "A virtue is a pervasive trait of character that allows one to 'fit into' a particular society and to excel in it," he says. This is something that we might query: what a society will recognize as a virtue (...)
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  4.  98
    Loyalty and Virtues.R. E. Ewin - 1992 - Philosophical Quarterly 42 (169):403-419.
    When loyalty is discussed, a very rare thing in recent years, it is sometimes listed as one of the virtues and just as often derided. Its relationship to the virtues, or to the other virtues, is difficult to discern, and that is at least partly because the role that judgement plays in loyalty seems odd. The argument of this paper is that there is a core value to loyalty, and that understanding this core value is of critical importance in understanding (...)
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  5.  50
    Loyalty: The Police.R. E. Ewin - 1990 - Criminal Justice Ethics 9 (2):3-15.
    What concerns me in this paper is a connection between motivation and various duties, especially duties that arise in the context of an institution such as a police force. I shall want to spread my net wider than that and discuss such issues as the role of loyalty in human life, but the focus will come back to the professional loyalties of police officers and, particularly, the discussion of the police culture in the Fitzgerald Report. What is it that motivates (...)
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  6.  13
    Co-Operation and Human Values: A Study of Moral Reasoning.R. E. Ewin - 1981 - New York: St. Martin's Press.
    I shall be dealing, throughout this book, with a set of related problems: the relationship between morality and reasoning in general, the way in which moral reasoning is properly to be carried on, and why morality is not arbitrary. The solutions to these problems come out of the same train of argument. Morality is not arbitrary, I shall argue, because the acceptance of certain qualities of character as virtues and the rejection of others as vices is forced on us by (...)
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  7.  43
    Corporations, Minors, and Other Innocents? A Reply to R. E. Ewin.P. Eddy Wilson - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (10):761 - 774.
    R. E. Ewin has argued that corporations are moral persons, but Ewin describes them as being unable to think or to act in virtuous and vicious ways. Ewin thinks that their impoverished emotional life would not allow them to act in these ways. In this brief essay I want to challenge the idea that corporations cannot act virtuously. I begin by examining deficiencies in Ewin''s notion of corporate personhood. I argue that he effectively reduces corporations to (...)
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  8.  72
    The Moral Status of the Corporation.R. E. Ewin - 1991 - Journal of Business Ethics 10 (10):749 - 756.
    Corporations are moral persons to the extent that they have rights and duties, but their moral personality is severely limited. As artificial persons, they lack the emotional make-up that allows natural persons to show virtues and vices. That fact, taken with the representative function of management, places significant limitations on what constitutes ethical behavior by management. A common misunderstanding of those limitations can lead ethical managers to behave unethically and can lead the public to have improper expectations of corporations.
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  9.  36
    Virtues and Rights: The Moral Philosophy of Thomas Hobbes.R. E. EWIN - 1991 - Westview Press.
    This book is a timely new interpretation of the moral and political philosophy of Thomas Hobbes. Staying close to Hobbes's text and working from a careful examination of the actual substance of the account of natural law, R.E. Ewin argues that Hobbes well understood the importance of moral behavior to civilized society. This interpretation stands as a much-needed corrective to readings of Hobbes that emphasize the rationally calculated, self-interested nature of human behavior. It poses a significant challenge to currently (...)
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  10.  13
    Corporations, Minors, and Other Innocents? A Reply to R. E. Ewin.P. Eddy Wilson - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (10):761-761.
    R. E. Ewin has argued that corporations are moral persons, but Ewin describes them as being unable to think or to act in virtuous and vicious ways. Ewin thinks that their impoverished emotional life would not allow them to act in these ways. In this brief essay I want to challenge the idea that corporations cannot act virtuously. I begin by examining deficiencies in Ewin's notion of corporate personhood. I argue that he effectively reduces corporations to (...)
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  11.  39
    Loyalties, and Why Loyalty Should Be Ignored.R. E. Ewin - 1993 - Criminal Justice Ethics 12 (1):36-42.
    Loyalty, by making us identify with others, takes us beyond the very limited self (roughly the self of the Hobbesian natural condition) that is involved in selfishness and that is usually involved when people consider that self-concern, that aspect of human nature that must be limited if we are to live peaceably, is the main stumbling block to morality. Loyalty can thus be thought of as a version of altruism, as an inclination to identify with others and to share their (...)
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  12.  71
    Corporate Loyalty: Its Objects and its Grounds. [REVIEW]R. E. Ewin - 1993 - Journal of Business Ethics 12 (5):387 - 396.
    Disloyalty is always a vice, but loyalty is not always a virtue, so ethical management should not seek simply whatever loyalty it can get. Loyalty can make it possible for us to trust each other, and, when it takes appropriate objects and does not take extreme or improper forms, it can lie at the heart of much of what makes life worthwhile. Hence, it is understandable that corporations and management seek loyalty despite the fact that it can so easily go (...)
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  13. What is Wrong with Killing People?R. E. Ewin - 1972 - Philosophical Quarterly 22 (87):126-139.
    Qualifications are needed to make the point a tight one, but it seems quite plain that it is wrong to kill people. What is not so plain is why it is wrong to kill people, especially when one considers that the person killed will not be around to suffer the consequences afterwards. He does not suffer as a consequence of his death, and he need not suffer even while dying. There are various conditions more or less commonly accepted as making (...)
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  14.  17
    Institutional Excuses and Neutrality.R. E. Ewin - 1995 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 9 (2):67-75.
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  15.  32
    Peoples and Secession.R. E. Ewin - 1994 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 11 (2):225-231.
    Kai Nielson (Secession: The Case of Quebec), as did Allen Buchanan in Secession, discusses secession on an analogy with no-fault divorce. Both these writers fail to distinguish between what it is to be a person and what it is to be a people, where peoples are the items that secede. The issue of what constitutes a people is thus crucial to the theory of secession (for similar reasons to those that made it crucial to seventeenth century debate about the right (...)
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  16. Reasons and the Fear of Death.R. E. Ewin - 2002 - Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Death, violent or otherwise, is a matter of widespread concern with ongoing debates about such matters as euthanasia and the nature of brain death. Philosophers have often argued about the rationality of fear of death. This book argues that that dispute has been misconceived: fear of death is not something that follows or fails to follow from reason, but rather, it forms the basis of reasoning and helps to show why people must be cooperating beings who accept certain sorts of (...)
     
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  17.  29
    Reasons and the Fear of Death R. E. Ewin Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2002, Vii + 167 Pp., $70.00, $24.95 Paper. [REVIEW]Byron J. Stoyles - 2003 - Dialogue 42 (4):821-.
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  18.  32
    Hobbes on Laughter.R. E. Ewin - 2001 - Philosophical Quarterly 51 (202):29-40.
    Hobbes' concern when he writes about laughter is a nameless passion, one of the possible responses we can have to somebody's perceived inferiority when they have acted in a way calculated to dishonour us. 'Of great minds, one of the proper works, is to help and free others from scorn', so great minds will not be given to much of such laughter. It is not the laughter that is of concern to Hobbes, but the passion that the laughter expresses; that (...)
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  19.  6
    Artificial Chains.R. E. Ewin - 2003 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (1):1 – 13.
    If laws restrict the liberty of citizens, they do not do so by taking away the capacity willingly to break the law; that is, they do not do so by removing our ability to will to do something contrary to the law and to succeed in so acting. They do not prevent or impede anybody’s motion. This much is set out explicitly by Hobbes: ‘generally all actions which men doe in Commonwealths, for feare of the law, are actions, which the (...)
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  20.  32
    Made With Words: Hobbes on Language, Mind and Politics.R. E. Ewin - 2009 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (4):678-681.
  21.  8
    Rights and Utilitarianism.R. E. Ewin - 1990 - Philosophical Papers 19 (3):213-224.
    One point fairly frequently argued by moral philosophers is the capacity of the various forms of Utilitarianism to handle the concept of a right. I want to show that any plausible moral theory must employ a concept of a right that does not allow of Utilitarian analysis. One requirement of any plausible moral code is that it allow us to live together peacefully; in that sense, at least, morality has its home in communities. Somebody might form their own purely personal (...)
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  22.  32
    Pride, Prejudice and Shyness.R. E. Ewin - 1990 - Philosophy 65 (252):137 - 154.
    Those of us who were made to study Pride and Prejudice at school know that Darcy represents pride and Elizabeth represents prejudice. Those of us who have actually read the book know that the situation is a good deal more complicated than that. The motivation for a significant part of the action is Elizabeth's pride, a point that is made quite clearly and is recognized by Elizabeth herself in what sounds like a thoroughly rehearsed speech: ‘How despicably have I acted!’ (...)
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  23. EWIN, R. E. Co-Operation and Human Values: A Study of Moral Reasoning. [REVIEW]N. J. H. Dent - 1982 - Philosophy 57:563.
     
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  24. Kuhse, H.: "The Sanctity-of-Life Doctrine in Medicine". [REVIEW]R. E. Ewin - 1990 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 68:245.
     
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  25. Kovesi's Moral Point of View.R. E. Ewin - 2012 - In Alan Tapper & T. Brian Mooney (eds.), Meaning and Morality. Leiden:
    Concepts, Kovesi argued in Moral Notions and elsewhere, are formed from a point of view; they express relevant needs, wants, interests, ideals, and attitudes, and are formed from a point of view that can be anybody’s. The point of view need not be everybody’s (not everybody is interested in chess, for example), but it is a point of view that can be taken by anybody. The point of view expresses our purpose in forming the concept (p. 48)1; it is the (...)
     
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  26. Liberty, Community, and Justice.R. E. Ewin - 1987 - Totowa, NJ: Rowman and Littlefield.
     
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  27.  17
    Why Worry About Business Ethics?R. E. Ewin - 1992 - Perth and Melbourne: Institute of Public Affairs.
    There are many problems about business ethics. What I want to deal with is only part of the problem: I want to consider just what can properly be expected of business in general terms by way of ethical behaviour and, along with that, what is special about business ethics and how it is related to the personal morality we are all expected to exhibit in our day-to-day lives; I want to consider how it is that ethical confusions arise from people's (...)
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  28.  40
    Personal Morality And Professional Ethics: The Lawyer’s Duty Of Zeal.R. E. Ewin - 1991 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 6 (2):35-45.
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  29. Obituary S. A. Grave, 1916-2002.R. E. Ewin - 2003 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (1):153.
     
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  30.  20
    Can There Be a Right to Secede?R. E. Ewin - 1995 - Philosophy 70 (273):341 - 362.
    ‘There is a moral right to secede.’It is not, perhaps, always entirely clear what Buchanan means with his reference to a right to secede, and that is a matter we shall have to deal with in due course, but, anyway, the claim that there is a moral right to secede is a good deal more complex than is apparent from Buchanan's ground-breaking work and involves a number of assumptions that need to be gone into if Buchanan's work is to be (...)
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  31.  42
    Wollheim's Paradox of Democracy.R. E. Ewin - 1967 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 45 (3):356 – 357.
    In Wollheim's paradox of democracy, democracy appears to involve its adherents (at least sometimes, and it always presupposes the possibility) in holding two incompatible beliefs about what ought to be done, and if democracy does this then democracy is a sadly confused idea. I want to suggest a solution to this apparent paradox. I shall try to show that voter V's statement that A ought to be done and his statement that B ought to be done are not inconsistent because (...)
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  32.  13
    Dr. Grice and the Contract Ground.R. E. Ewin - 1969 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 47 (1):25 – 30.
    In his very interesting book The Grounds of Moral Judgement, Dr. G. R. Grice tries to reconstitute contract theory so as to give an account of morality such that moral requirements can be explained in terms of what he calls the contract ground. He wants to go on and argue from this that it is irrational to be immoral, but my concern lies immediately with the contract ground. I think that faults can be found in the setting up of the (...)
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  33.  19
    Obituary.R. E. Ewin - 2003 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (1):153 – 154.
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  34.  39
    On Justice and Injustice.R. E. Ewin - 1970 - Mind 79 (314):200-216.
    In order to make clear the problem with which I am dealing, it is necessary to draw an often-drawn distinction : the distinction between judicial and non-judicial justice, as it is sometimes called, or the distinction between the justice of an application of a law and the justice of a law. A law is applied justly if it is applied impartially. Judicial justice has been done, or the law has been applied justly, if the judge considers all and only the (...)
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  35.  8
    Actions, Brain-Processes, and Determinism.R. E. Ewin - 1968 - Mind 77 (307):417-419.
    It is certainly true that we could give an account in mechanistic terms of what there is which would be, in one sense, as complete account of what there is. If everything listed in the account were put in a pile, for example, there might be nothing left out of the pile for someone to go and fetch to it. This would be one sense in which we could give, in mechanistic or purely physical terms, a complete account of what (...)
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  36. MacIntyre and Kovesi on the Nature of Moral Concepts.Alan Tapper & R. E. Ewin - 2012 - In Alan Tapper & Brian Mooney (eds.), Meaning and Morality: Essays on the Philosophy of Julius Kovesi. Leiden: Brill. pp. 123-37.
    Julius Kovesi was a moral philosopher contemporary with Alasdair MacIntyre, and dealing with many of the same questions as MacIntyre. In our view, Kovesi’s moral philosophy is rich in ideas and worth revisiting. MacIntyre agrees: Kovesi’s Moral Notions, he has said, is ‘a minor classic in moral philosophy that has not yet received its due’. Kovesi was not a thinker whose work fits readily into any one tradition. Unlike the later MacIntyre, he was not a Thomistic Aristotelian, nor even an (...)
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  37. Moral Notions, with Three Papers on Plato.Alan Tapper, R. E. Ewin & Julius Kovesi (eds.) - 2004 - Christchurch, NZ: Cybereditions.
    Morality is often thought of as non-rational or sub-rational. In Moral Notions, first published in 1967, Julius Kovesi argues that the rationality of morality is built into the way we construct moral concepts. In showing this he also resolves the old Humean conundrum of the relation between 'facts' and 'values'. And he puts forward a method of reasoning that might make 'applied ethics' (at present largely a hodge-podge of opinions) into a constructive discipline. Kovesi's general theory of concepts - important (...)
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  38.  11
    Virtues and Rights: The Moral Philosophy of Thomas Hobbes.S. A. Lloyd & R. E. Ewin - 1994 - Philosophical Review 103 (4):753.
  39.  83
    Moore's Defence of Common Sense: A Reappraisal After Fifty Years: R. E. Tully.R. E. Tully - 1976 - Philosophy 51 (197):289-306.
    G. E. Moore's ‘A Defence of Common Sense’ has generated the kind of interest and contrariety which often accompany what is new, provocative, and even important in philosophy. Moore himself reportedly agreed with Wittgenstein's estimate that this was his best article, while C. D. Broad has lamented its very great but largely unfortunate influence. Although the essay inspired Wittgenstein to explore the basis of Moore's claim to know many propositions of common sense to be true, A. J. Ayer judges its (...)
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  40.  5
    The Concept of Disease and its Implications for Psychiatry.R. E. Kendell - 1974 - University of Edinburgh.
  41. Free Will as Involving Determination and Inconceivable Without It.R. E. Hobart - 1934 - Mind 43 (169):1-27.
    The thesis of this article is that there has never been any ground for the controversy between the doctrine of free will and determinism, that it is based upon a misapprehension, that the two assertions are entirely consistent, that one of them strictly implies the other, that they have been opposed only because of our natural want of the analytical imagination. In so saying I do not tamper with the meaning of either phrase. That would be unpardonable. I mean free (...)
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  42. Toward the Development of a Multidimensional Scale for Improving Evaluations of Business Ethics.R. E. Reidenbach & D. P. Robin - 1990 - Journal of Business Ethics 9 (8):639 - 653.
    This study represents an improvement in the ethics scales inventory published in a 1988 Journal of Business Ethics article. The article presents the distillation and validation process whereby the original 33 item inventory was reduced to eight items. These eight items comprise the following ethical dimensions: a moral equity dimension, a relativism dimension, and a contractualism dimension. The multidimensional ethics scale demonstrates significant predictive ability.
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  43.  48
    R. E. Bell: Place-Names in Classical Mythology: Greece. Pp. Xiii + 350. Santa Barbara, Cal. And Oxford: ABC-Clio, 1989. £34.75. [REVIEW]A. R. Burn - 1990 - The Classical Review 40 (2):529-530.
  44.  94
    Papyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. I. The Warren Papyri. Ed. by M. David, B. A. van Groningen, and J. C. van Oven. Pp. xii + 76, 7 pll. 1941. Gld. 15. E. J. Brill, Leyden.II. Einige Wiener Papyri. Ed. by E. Boswinkel. Pp. viii + 76, 6 pll. 1942. Gld. 15. E. J. Brill, Leyden. III. Some Oxford Papyri. Ed. by E.P. Wegener. A. Text, pp. xxi + 96. 1942. B. Plates . 1948. Gld. 25. E. J. Brill, Leyden. IV. De Herodoti reliquiis in papyris et membranie Aegyptiis servatis. Ed. by A. H. R. E. Paap. Pp. viii + 104. 1948. Gld. 17.50. E. J. Brill, Leyden. V. Recherches sur le Recensement dans l'Égypte romaine . Ed. by M. Humbert and Cl. Préaux. Pp. x + 186, 1 pl. 1952. Gld. 50. E. J. Brill, Leyden.VI. A Family-Archive from Tebtunis. Ed. by B. A. van Groningen. 1950. Pp. xvi + 190. Gld. 40. E. J. Brill, Leyden. [REVIEW]E. G. Turner, M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven, E. Boswinkel, E. P. Wegener, A. H. R. E. Paap, M. Hombert & Cl Preaux - 1953 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 73:163-164.
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  45.  45
    Exploring Employee Engagement with Social Responsibility: A Social Exchange Perspective on Organisational Participation.R. E. Slack, S. Corlett & R. Morris - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 127 (3):537-548.
    Corporate social responsibility is a recognised and common part of business activity. Some of the regularly cited motives behind CSR are employee morale, recruitment and retention, with employees acknowledged as a key organisational stakeholder. Despite the significance of employees in relation to CSR, relatively few studies have examined their engagement with CSR and the impediments relevant to this engagement. This exploratory case study-based research addresses this paucity of attention, drawing on one to one interviews and observation in a large UK (...)
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  46. Protecting the Vulnerable: A Reanalysis of Our Social Responsibilities.R. E. GOODIN - 1985
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  47. A Critical Theory of Education: Habermas and Our Children's Future.R. E. Young - 1990 - Teachers College Press.
  48.  13
    R. Wilson Bryan. Magic and the Millennium. A Sociological Study of Religious Movements of Protest Among Tribal and Third-World Peoples. Xi and 547 Pages £6·50. [REVIEW]R. E. S. Tanner - 1974 - Religious Studies 10 (3):382.
  49.  25
    Robert R. Tompkins. On Kleene's Recursive Realizability as an Interpretation for Intuitionistic Elementary Number Theory. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic, Vol. 9 No. 4 , Pp. 289–293. [REVIEW]R. E. Vesley - 1970 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 35 (3):475.
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  50.  12
    Latent Inhibition and Schizophrenia.R. E. Lubow, I. Weiner, A. Schlossberg & I. Baruch - 1987 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 25 (6):464-467.
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