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  1. Autism as a Natural Human Variation: Reflections on the Claims of the Neurodiversity Movement. [REVIEW]Pier Jaarsma & Stellan Welin - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (1):20-30.
    Neurodiversity has remained a controversial concept over the last decade. In its broadest sense the concept of neurodiversity regards atypical neurological development as a normal human difference. The neurodiversity claim contains at least two different aspects. The first aspect is that autism, among other neurological conditions, is first and foremost a natural variation. The other aspect is about conferring rights and in particular value to the neurodiversity condition, demanding recognition and acceptance. Autism can be seen as a natural variation on (...)
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  2.  67
    Living the Categorical Imperative: Autistic Perspectives on Lying and Truth Telling–Between Kant and Care Ethics. [REVIEW]Pier Jaarsma, Petra Gelhaus & Stellan Welin - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (3):271-277.
    Lying is a common phenomenon amongst human beings. It seems to play a role in making social interactions run more smoothly. Too much honesty can be regarded as impolite or downright rude. Remarkably, lying is not a common phenomenon amongst normally intelligent human beings who are on the autism spectrum. They appear to be ‘attractively morally innocent’ and seem to have an above average moral conscientious objection against deception. In this paper, the behavior of persons with autism with regard to (...)
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  3.  12
    Medium-Range Narratives as a Complementary Tool to Principle-Based Prioritization in Sweden: Test Case “ADHD”.Pier Jaarsma & Petra Gelhaus - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (1):113-125.
    In this paper, for the benefit of reflection processes in clinical and in local, regional, and national priority-setting, we aim to develop an ethical theoretical framework that includes both ethical principles and medium-range narratives. We present our suggestion in the particular case of having to choose between treatment interventions for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and treatment interventions for other conditions or diseases, under circumstances of scarcity. In order to arrive at our model, we compare two distinct ethical approaches: a generalist (...)
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  4.  24
    Autism, Accommodation and Treatment: A Rejoinder to Chong‐Ming Lim's Critique.Pier Jaarsma & Stellan Welin - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (9):684-685.
    We are very grateful to Chong-Ming Lim for his thoughtful reply published in this journal on one of our articles, which motivated us to think more carefully about accommodating autistic individuals and treating autism. However we believe there are some confusions in Lim's argument. Lim uses the accommodation thesis, according to which we should accommodate autistic individuals rather than treat autism, as the starting point for his reasoning. He claims that if the accommodation thesis is right, then we should not (...)
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  5.  43
    Human Capabilities, Mild Autism, Deafness and the Morality of Embryo Selection.Pier Jaarsma & Stellan Welin - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):817-824.
    A preimplantation genetic test to discriminate between severe and mild autism spectrum disorder might be developed in the foreseeable future. Recently, the philosophers Julian Savulescu and Guy Kahane claimed that there are strong reasons for prospective parents to make use of such a test to prevent the birth of children who are disposed to autism or Asperger’s disorder. In this paper we will criticize this claim. We will discuss the morality of selection for mild autism in embryo selection in a (...)
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  6.  34
    Cultivation of Empathy in Individuals with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder.Pier Jaarsma - 2013 - Ethics and Education 8 (3):290-300.
    High-functioning individuals with autism spectrum disorder typically lack cognitive empathy, compromising their moral agency from both a Kantian and a Humean perspective. Nevertheless, they are capable of exhibiting moral behavior, and sometimes, they exhibit what may be deemed ‘super-moral’ behavior. The empathy deficit poses, to varying degrees, limitations with respect to their moral motivation and moral agency. To compensate for this deficit, individuals with HF-ASD rely primarily, and justifiably, on the formation and application of moral rules. Educators who focus predominantly (...)
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