Results for 'Physicians'

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  1.  18
    Physician Aid-in-Dying and Suicide Prevention in Psychiatry: A Moral Crisis?Margaret Battin & Brent M. Kious - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (10):29-39.
    Involuntary psychiatric commitment for suicide prevention and physician aid-in-dying in terminal illness combine to create a moral dilemma. If PAD in terminal illness is permissible, it should also be permissible for some who suffer from nonterminal psychiatric illness: suffering provides much of the justification for PAD, and the suffering in mental illness can be as severe as in physical illness. But involuntary psychiatric commitment to prevent suicide suggests that the suffering of persons with mental illness does not justify ending their (...)
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  2.  2
    Nietzsche as Cultural Physician.Daniel R. Ahern - 1995 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    From Nietzsche's early writings to those marking the end of his intellectual life, the dynamics of what he called "physiology" permeate virtually every facet of his philosophical enterprise. In the following investigation, these dynamics are explored as an interpretive key to not only the dominant themes but also the philosophical motive underlying Nietzsche's philosophy. This motive is described in terms of his diagnosis and attempted cure for the disease of nihilism. In this we maintain that Nietzsche's foremost philosophical task is (...)
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  3.  56
    Physicians' Access to Ethics Support Services in Four European Countries.Samia A. Hurst, Stella Reiter-Theil, Arnaud Perrier, Reidun Forde, Anne-Marie Slowther, Renzo Pegoraro & Marion Danis - 2007 - Health Care Analysis 15 (4):321-335.
    Clinical ethics support services are developing in Europe. They will be most useful if they are designed to match the ethical concerns of clinicians. We conducted a cross-sectional mailed survey on random samples of general physicians in Norway, Switzerland, Italy, and the UK, to assess their access to different types of ethics support services, and to describe what makes them more likely to have used available ethics support. Respondents reported access to formal ethics support services such as clinical ethics (...)
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  4. Physician Assisted Suicide: A New Look at the Arguments.J. M. Dieterle - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (3):127–139.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper, I examine the arguments against physician assisted suicide . Many of these arguments are consequentialist. Consequentialist arguments rely on empirical claims about the future and thus their strength depends on how likely it is that the predictions will be realized. I discuss these predictions against the backdrop of Oregon's Death with Dignity Act and the practice of PAS in the Netherlands. I then turn to a specific consequentialist argument against PAS – Susan M. Wolf's feminist critique of (...)
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  5. Increasing Physician Participation as Subjects in Scientific and Quality Improvement Research.Amy L. McGuire & Sylvia J. Hysong - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1).
    BackgroundThe twenty-first century has witnessed an exponential increase in healthcare quality research. As such activities become more prevalent, physicians are increasingly needed to participate as subjects in research and quality improvement projects. This raises an important ethical question: how should physicians be remunerated for participating as research and/or QI subjects?Financial versus non-monetary incentives for participationResearch suggests participation in research and QI is often driven by conditional altruism, the idea that although initial interest in enrolling in research is altruistic (...)
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  6. The Physician's Covenant: Images of the Healer in Medical Ethics.William F. May - 1983 - Westminster John Knox Press.
    A discussion of Christian ethics focuses on the physician's image as a parent, warrior against death, expert, and teacher, and the oath that guides his or her practice.
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  7.  27
    How Physicians Face Ethical Difficulties: A Qualitative Analysis.S. A. Hurst - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (1):7-14.
    Next SectionBackground: Physicians face ethical difficulties daily, yet they seek ethics consultation infrequently. To date, no systematic data have been collected on the strategies they use to resolve such difficulties when they do so without the help of ethics consultation. Thus, our understanding of ethical decision making in day to day medical practice is poor. We report findings from the qualitative analysis of 310 ethically difficult situations described to us by physicians who encountered them in their practice. When (...)
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  8.  36
    Physicians Under the Influence: Social Psychology and Industry Marketing Strategies.Sunita Sah & Adriane Fugh-Berman - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):665-672.
    Pharmaceutical and medical device companies apply social psychology to influence physicians' prescribing behavior and decision making. Physicians fail to recognize their vulnerability to commercial influences due to self-serving bias, rationalization, and cognitive dissonance. Professionalism offers little protection; even the most conscious and genuine commitment to ethical behavior cannot eliminate unintentional, subconscious bias. Six principles of influence — reciprocation, commitment, social proof, liking, authority, and scarcity — are key to the industry's routine marketing strategies, which rely on the illusion (...)
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  9.  20
    Physicians' Role in Helping to Die.Jose Luis Guerrero Quiñones - 2022 - Conatus 7 (1):79-101.
    Euthanasia and the duty to die have both been thoroughly discussed in the field of bioethics as morally justifiable practices within medical healthcare contexts. The existence of a narrow connection between both could also be established, for people having a duty to die should be allowed to actively hasten their death by the active means offered by euthanasia. Choosing the right time to end one’s own life is a decisive factor to retain autonomy at the end of our lives. However, (...)
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  10.  25
    Physicians Under the Influence: Social Psychology and Industry Marketing Strategies.Sunita Sah & Adriane Fugh-Berman - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):665-672.
    It is easier to resist at the beginning than at the end.– Leonardo da VinciPhysicians often believe that a conscious commitment to ethical behavior and professionalism will protect them from industry influence. Despite increasing concern over the extent of physician-industry relationships, physicians usually fail to recognize the nature and impact of subconscious and unintentional biases on therapeutic decision-making. Pharmaceutical and medical device companies, however, routinely demonstrate their knowledge of social psychology processes on behavior and apply these principles to their (...)
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  11.  66
    Legal Physician-Assisted Dying in Oregon and the Netherlands: Evidence Concerning the Impact on Patients in "Vulnerable" Groups.M. P. Battin, A. van der Heide, L. Ganzini, G. van der Wal & B. D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (10):591-597.
    Background: Debates over legalisation of physician-assisted suicide or euthanasia often warn of a “slippery slope”, predicting abuse of people in vulnerable groups. To assess this concern, the authors examined data from Oregon and the Netherlands, the two principal jurisdictions in which physician-assisted dying is legal and data have been collected over a substantial period.Methods: The data from Oregon comprised all annual and cumulative Department of Human Services reports 1998–2006 and three independent studies; the data from the Netherlands comprised all four (...)
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  12.  18
    Physician Autonomy and the Opioid Crisis.Nathan Guevremont, Mark Barnes & Claudia E. Haupt - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (2):203-219.
    The scope and severity of the opioid epidemic in the United States has prompted significant legislative intrusion into the patient-physician relationship. These proscriptive regulatory regimes mirror earlier legislation in other politically-charged domains like abortion and gun regulation. We draw on lessons from those contexts to argue that states should consider integrating their responses to the epidemic with existing medical regulatory structures, making physicians partners rather than adversaries in addressing this public health crisis.
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  13.  43
    How Physicians Allocate Scarce Resources at the Bedside: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Studies.D. Strech, M. Synofzik & G. Marckmann - 2008 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (1):80-99.
    Although rationing of scarce health-care resources is inevitable in clinical practice, there is still limited and scattered information about how physicians perceive and execute this bedside rationing (BSR) and how it can be performed in an ethically fair way. This review gives a systematic overview on physicians’ perspectives on influences, strategies, and consequences of health-care rationing. Relevant references as identified by systematically screening major electronic databases and manuscript references were synthesized by thematic analysis. Retrieved studies focused on themes (...)
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  14.  29
    Are Physicians Obligated Always to Act in the Patient's Best Interests?D. Wendler - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (2):66-70.
    The principle that physicians should always act in the best interests of the present patient is widely endorsed. At the same time, and often within the same document, it is recognised that there are appropriate exceptions to this principle. Unfortunately, little, if any, guidance is provided regarding which exceptions are appropriate and how they should be handled. These circumstances might be tenable if the appropriate exceptions were rare. Yet, evaluation of the literature reveals that there are numerous exceptions, several (...)
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  15. Are Physicians Willing to Ration Health Care? Conflicting Findings in a Systematic Review of Survey Research.Daniel Strech, Govind Persad, Georg Marckmann & Marion Danis - 2009 - Health Policy 90 (2):113-124.
    Several quantitative surveys have been conducted internationally to gather empirical information about physicians’ general attitudes towards health care rationing. Are physicians ready to accept and implement rationing, or are they rather reluctant? Do they prefer implicit bedside rationing that allows the physician–patient relationship broad leeway in individual decisions? Or do physicians prefer strategies that apply explicit criteria and rules?
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  16. Physician‐Assisted Suicide: Two Moral Arguments.Judith Jarvis Thomson - 1999 - Ethics 109 (3):497-518.
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  17.  43
    Why Physicians Ought to Lie for Their Patients.Nicolas Tavaglione & Samia Hurst - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (3):4-12.
    Sometimes physicians lie to third-party payers in order to grant their patients treatment they would otherwise not receive. This strategy, commonly known as gaming the system, is generally condemned for three reasons. First, it may hurt the patient for the sake of whom gaming was intended. Second, it may hurt other patients. Third, it offends contractual and distributive justice. Hence, gaming is considered to be immoral behavior. This article is an attempt to show that, on the contrary, gaming may (...)
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  18.  31
    Physicians' Silent Decisions: Because Patient Autonomy Does Not Always Come First.Simon N. Whitney & Laurence B. McCullough - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (7):33 – 38.
    Physicians make some medical decisions without disclosure to their patients. Nondisclosure is possible because these are silent decisions to refrain from screening, diagnostic or therapeutic interventions. Nondisclosure is ethically permissible when the usual presumption that the patient should be involved in decisions is defeated by considerations of clinical utility or patient emotional and physical well-being. Some silent decisions - not all - are ethically justified by this standard. Justified silent decisions are typically dependent on the physician's professional judgment, experience (...)
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  19. Science and Modern Civilisation the Harveian Oration : Delivered Before the Royal College of Physicians, October 18, 1897.William Roberts & Royal College of Physicians of London - 1897 - Smith, Elder.
  20. Physicians Ignore Philosophy at Their Risk - and Ours.Mario Bunge - 2000 - Facta Philosophica 2 (1):149-160.
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  21.  49
    Attitudes Toward Physician-Assisted Suicide Among Physicians in Vermont.A. Craig, B. Cronin, W. Eward, J. Metz, L. Murray, G. Rose, E. Suess & M. E. Vergara - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (7):400-403.
    Background: Legislation on physician-assisted suicide is being considered in a number of states since the passage of the Oregon Death With Dignity Act in 1994. Opinion assessment surveys have historically assessed particular subsets of physicians.Objective: To determine variables predictive of physicians’ opinions on PAS in a rural state, Vermont, USA.Design: Cross-sectional mailing survey.Participants: 1052 physicians licensed by the state of Vermont.Results: Of the respondents, 38.2% believed PAS should be legalised, 16.0% believed it should be prohibited and 26.0% (...)
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  22.  53
    Physicians' Duties and the Non-Identity Problem.Tony Hope & John McMillan - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (8):21 - 29.
    The non-identity problem arises when an intervention or behavior changes the identity of those affected. Delaying pregnancy is an example of such a behavior. The problem is whether and in what ways such changes in identity affect moral considerations. While a great deal has been written about the non-identity problem, relatively little has been written about the implications for physicians and how they should understand their duties. We argue that the non-identity problem can make a crucial moral difference in (...)
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  23.  17
    The Physician Charter on Medical Professionalism: A Jewish Ethical Perspective.A. B. Jotkowitz - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (7):404-405.
    The physician charter on medical professionalism creates standards of ethical behaviour for physicians and has been endorsed by professional organisations worldwide. It is based on the cardinal principles of the primacy of patient welfare, patient autonomy, and social welfare. There has been little discussion in the bioethics community of the doctrine of the charter and none from a Jewish ethical perspective. In this essay the authors discuss the obligations of the charter from a Jewish ethical viewpoint and call on (...)
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  24. Physician Perspectives and Compliance with Patient Advance Directives: The Role External Factors Play on Physician Decision Making. [REVIEW]Christopher M. Burkle, Paul S. Mueller, Keith M. Swetz, C. Hook & Mark T. Keegan - 2012 - BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):31-.
    Background Following passage of the Patient Self Determination Act in 1990, health care institutions that receive Medicare and Medicaid funding are required to inform patients of their right to make their health care preferences known through execution of a living will and/or to appoint a surrogate-decision maker. We evaluated the impact of external factors and perceived patient preferences on physicians’ decisions to honor or forgo previously established advance directives (ADs). In addition, physician views regarding legal risk, patients’ ability to (...)
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  25.  33
    Physician Dismissal of Families Who Refuse Vaccination: An Ethical Assessment.Douglas S. Diekema - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):654-660.
    Thousands of U.S. parents choose to refuse or delay the administration of selected vaccines to their children each year, and some choose not to vaccinate their children at all. While most physicians continue to provide care to these families over time, using each visit as an opportunity to educate and encourage vaccination, an increasing number of physicians are choosing to dismiss these families from their practice unless they agree to vaccinate their children. This paper will examine this emerging (...)
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  26. Physician-Patient Decision-Making: A Study in Medical Ethics.Douglas N. Walton - 1985 - Greenwood Press.
    Walton offers a comprehensive, flexible model for physician-patient decision making, the first such tool designed to be applied at the level of each particular case. Based on Aristotelian practical reasoning, it develops a method of reasonable dialogue, a question- and-answer process of interaction leading to informed consent on the part of the patient, and to a decision--mutually arrived at--reflecting both high medical standards and the patient's felt needs. After setting forth his model, he applies it to three vital ethical issues: (...)
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  27.  11
    Physicians’ End of Life Discussions with Patients: Is There an Ethical Obligation to Discuss Aid in Dying?Yan Ming Jane Zhou & Wayne Shelton - 2020 - HEC Forum 32 (3):227-238.
    Since Oregon implemented its Death with Dignity Act, many additional states have followed suit demonstrating a growing understanding and acceptance of aid in dying processes. Traditionally, the patient has been the one to request and seek this option out. However, as Death with Dignity acts continue to expand, it will impact the role of physicians and bring up questions over whether physicians have the ethical obligation to facilitate a conversation about AID with patients during end of life discussions. (...)
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  28.  43
    Women Physicians' Narratives About Being in Ethically Difficult Care Situations in Paediatrics.V. Sørlie, A. Lindseth, G. Udén & A. Norberg - 2000 - Nursing Ethics 7 (1):47-62.
    This study is part of a comprehensive investigation of ethical thinking among male and female physicians and nurses. Nine women physicians with different levels of expertise, working in various wards in paediatric clinics at two of the university hospitals in Norway, narrated 37 stories about their experience of being in ethically difficult care situations. All of the interviewees’ narrations were concerned with problems relating to both action ethics and relation ethics. The main focus was on problems in a (...)
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  29.  22
    Physicians’ Personal Values in Determining Medical Decision-Making Capacity: A Survey Study.Helena Hermann, Manuel Trachsel & Nikola Biller-Andorno - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (9):739-744.
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  30. Physician-Assisted Death in Perspective: Assessing the Dutch Experience.Stuart J. Youngner & Gerrit K. Kimsma (eds.) - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the first comprehensive report and analysis of the Dutch euthanasia experience over the last three decades. In contrast to most books about euthanasia, which are written by authors from countries where the practice is illegal and therefore practised only secretly, this book analyzes empirical data and real-life clinical behavior. Its essays were written by the leading Dutch scholars and clinicians who shaped euthanasia policy and who have studied, evaluated and helped regulate it. Some of them have themselves (...)
     
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  31.  41
    Physicians' and Nurses' Expectations and Objections Toward a Clinical Ethics Committee.Maximiliane Jansky, Gabriella Marx, Friedemann Nauck & Bernd Alt-Epping - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (7):0969733013478308.
    The study aimed to explore the subjective need of healthcare professionals for ethics consultation, their experience with ethical conflicts, and expectations and objections toward a Clinical Ethics Committee. Staff at a university hospital took part in a survey (January to June 2010) using a questionnaire with open and closed questions. Descriptive data for physicians and nurses (response rate = 13.5%, n = 101) are presented. Physicians and nurses reported similar high frequencies of ethical conflicts but rated the relevance (...)
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  32.  3
    The Physician as Captain of the Ship a Critical Reappraisal.N. M. King, L. R. Churchill & Alan W. Cross - 1987 - Springer.
    "The fixed person for fixed duties, who in older societies was such a godsend, in the future ill be a public danger." Twenty years ago, a single legal metaphor accurately captured the role that American society accorded to physicians. The physician was "c- tain of the ship." Physicians were in charge of the clinic, the Operating room, and the health care team, responsible - and held accountabl- for all that happened within the scope of their supervision. This grant (...)
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  33.  57
    Physician‐Assisted Death and Severe, Treatment‐Resistant Depression.Bonnie Steinbock - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (5):30-42.
    Should people suffering from untreatable psychiatric conditions be eligible for physician-assisted death? This is possible in Belgium and the Netherlands, where PAD for psychiatric conditions is permitted, though rare, so long as the criteria of due care are met. Those opposed to all instances of PAD point to Belgium and the Netherlands as a dark warning that once PAD is legalized, restricting it will prove impossible because safeguards, such as the requirement that a patient be terminally ill, will inevitably be (...)
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  34. Does Physician Assisted Suicide Violate the Integrity of Medicine?Richard Momeyer - 1995 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (1):13-24.
    This paper evaluates the arguments against physician assisted suicide which contend that it violates the integrity of medicine and the physician-patient relation; i.e. that it contradicts the goal of seeking health and healing, violates an absolute prohibition against killing, and undermines the patient's trust in the physician. These arguments against physician assisted suicide (1) misuse notions of teleology and teleological explanation; (2) rely on inappropriate notions of "ideal medicine", for which death is a defeat; (3) turn on a highly selective (...)
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  35.  9
    Physicians’ Practices When Frustrating Patients’ Needs: A Comparative Study of Restrictiveness in Offering Abortion and Sedation Therapy: Table 1.Niels Lynøe - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (5):306-309.
    In this paper it is argued that physicians’ restrictive attitudes in offering abortions during 1946–1965 in Sweden were due to their private values. The values, however, were rarely presented openly. Instead physicians’ values influenced their assessment of the facts presented—that is, the women's’ trustworthiness. In this manner the physicians were able to conceal their private values and impede the women from getting what they wanted and needed. The practice was concealed from both patients and physicians and (...)
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  36.  40
    Can Physicians Conceive of Performing Euthanasia in Case of Psychiatric Disease, Dementia or Being Tired of Living?Eva Elizabeth Bolt, Marianne C. Snijdewind, Dick L. Willems, Agnes van der Heide & Bregje D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):592-598.
  37.  29
    Physician Involvement in Hostile Interrogations.Fritz Allhoff - 2006 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (4):392-402.
    In this paper, I have two main goals. First, I will argue that traditional medical values mandate, as opposed to forbid, at least minimal physician participation in hostile interrogations. Second, I will argue that traditional medical duties or responsibilities do not apply to medically-trained interrogators. In support of this conclusion, I will argue that medically-trained interrogators could simply choose not to enter into a patient-physician relationship. Recognizing that this argument might not be convincing, I will then propose three further arguments (...)
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  38.  25
    Physicians at War: The Dual-Loyalties Challenge.Fritz Allhoff - 2008 - Journal of Military Ethics 7 (4):320-322.
    There are a range of ethical issues that confront physicians in times of war, as well as some of the uses of physicians during wars. This book presents a theoretical apparatus which undergirds those debates, namely by casting physicians as being confronted with dual-loyalties during times of war. While this theoretical apparatus has already been developed in other contexts, it has not been specifically brought to bear on the ethical conflicts that attain in wars. Arguably, wars thrust (...)
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  39.  36
    Should Physicians Be Gatekeepers of Medical Resources?M. C. Weinstein - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (4):268-274.
    Physicians have an ethical responsibility to their patients to offer the best available medical care. This responsibility conflicts with their role as gatekeepers of the limited health care resources available for all patients collectively. It is ethically untenable to expect doctors to face this trade-off during each patient encounter; the physician cannot be expected to compromise the wellbeing of the patient in the office in favour of anonymous patients elsewhere. Hence, as in other domains of public policy where individual (...)
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  40.  66
    Physician Brain Drain: Can Nothing Be Done?Nir Eyal & Samia A. Hurst - 2008 - Public Health Ethics 1 (2):180-192.
    Next SectionAccess to medicines, vaccination and care in resource-poor settings is threatened by the emigration of physicians and other health workers. In entire regions of the developing world, low physician density exacerbates child and maternal mortality and hinders treatment of HIV/AIDS. This article invites philosophers to help identify ethical and effective responses to medical brain drain. It reviews existing proposals and their limitations. It makes a case that, in resource-poor countries, ’locally relevant medical training’—teaching primarily locally endemic diseases and (...)
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  41.  67
    Physician-Assisted Suicide, the Right to Die, and Misconceptions About Life.Mario Tito Ferreira Moreno & Pedro Fior Mota De Andrade - 2022 - Human Affairs 32 (1):14-27.
    In this paper, we analyze the legal situation regarding physician-assisted suicide in the world. Our hypothesis is that the prohibitive stance on physician-assisted suicide in most societies in the world today seems to be related to our moral attitudes toward suicide. This brings us to a discussion about life itself. We claim that the total lack of legal protection for physician-assisted suicide from international organizations and most countries in the world lies in a philosophical assumption that supports much of our (...)
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  42.  11
    Physicians and Caregivers Do Differ in Ethical Attitudes to Daily Clinical Practice.Patrik Kjærsdam Telléus, Dorte Møller Holdgaard & Birthe Thørring - 2018 - Clinical Ethics 13 (4):209-219.
    It is commonly assumed that there are differences in physicians’ and caregivers’ ethical attitudes towards clinical situations. The assumption is that the difference is driven by different values, views and judgements in specific situations. At Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark, we aimed to investigate these assumptions by conducting a large quantitative study. The study design, based on the Factorial Survey Method, was a carefully constructed survey with 50 questions designed to test which factors influenced the respondents’ ethical reasoning. The factors (...)
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  43.  1
    Depression and Physician-Aid-in-Dying.Ian Tully - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (3):368-386.
    In this paper, I address the question of whether it is ever permissible to grant a request for physician-aid-in-dying from an individual suffering from treatment-resistant depression. I assume for the sake of argument that PAD is sometimes permissible. There are three requirements for PAD: suffering, prognosis, and competence. First, an individual must be suffering from an illness or injury which is sufficient to cause serious, ongoing hardship. Second, one must have exhausted effective treatment options, and one’s prospects for recovery must (...)
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  44.  30
    Understanding Physician-Pharmaceutical Industry Interactions: A Concise Guide.Shaili Jain - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Physician-pharmaceutical industry interactions continue to generate heated debate in academic and public domains, both in the United States and abroad. Despite this, recent research suggests that physicians and physicians-in-training remain ignorant of the core issues and are ill-prepared to understand pharmaceutical industry promotion. There is a vast medical literature on this topic, but no single, concise resource. This book aims to fill that gap by providing a resource that explains the essential elements of this subject. The text makes (...)
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  45. Physician Emigration, Population Health and Public Policies.Alok Bhargava - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (10):616-618.
    This brief commentary reappraises the issue of emigration of physicians from developing countries to developed countries. A methodological framework is developed for assessing the impact of physician emigration on population health outcomes. The evidence from macro and micro studies suggest that developing countries especially in sub-Saharan Africa would benefit from regulating physician emigration because the loss of physicians can lower quality of healthcare services and lead to worse health outcomes. Further discussion is contained in an e-letter: http://jme.bmj.com/content/early/2013/05/30/medethics-2013-101409/reply.
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  46. Physicians Should “Assist in Suicide” When It Is Appropriate.Timothy E. Quill - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (1):57-65.
    Palliative care and hospice should be the standards of care for all terminally ill patients. The first place for clinicians to go when responding to a request for assisted death is to ensure the adequacy of palliative interventions. Although such interventions are generally effective, a small percentage of patients will suffer intolerably despite receiving state-of-the-art palliative care, and a few of these patients will request a physician-assisted death. Five potential “last resort” interventions are available under these circumstances: (1) accelerating opioids (...)
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  47.  69
    The Physician as Friend to the Patient.Nir Ben-Moshe - forthcoming - In The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Friendship.
    My question in the chapter is this: could (and should) the role of the physician be construed as that of a friend to the patient? I begin by briefly discussing the “friendship model” of the physician-patient relationship—according to which physicians and patients could, and perhaps should, be friends—as well as its history and limitations. Given these limitations, I focus on the more one-sided idea that the physician could, and perhaps should, be a friend to the patient (a “physician-qua-friend model” (...)
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  48. Medicine, Money, and Morals: Physicians' Conflicts of Interest.Marc A. Rodwin - 1993 - Oxford University Press.
    Conflicts of interest are rampant in the American medical community. Today it is not uncommon for doctors to refer patients to clinics or labs in which they have a financial interest (40% of physicians in Florida invest in medical centers); for hospitals to offer incentives to physicians who refer patients (a practice that can lead to unnecessary hospitalization); or for drug companies to provide lucrative give-aways to entice doctors to use their "brand name" drugs (which are much more (...)
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  49.  19
    Croatian Physicians' and Nurses' Experience with Ethical Issues in Clinical Practice.I. Sorta-Bilajac, K. Bazdaric, B. Brozovic & G. J. Agich - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (6):450-455.
    Aim: To assess ethical issues in everyday clinical practice among physicians and nurses of the University Hospital Rijeka, Rijeka, Croatia.Subjects and methods: We surveyed the entire population of internal medicine, oncology and intensive care specialists and associated nurses employed at the University Hospital Rijeka, Rijeka, Croatia . An anonymous questionnaire was used to explore the type and frequency of ethical dilemmas, rank of their difficulty, access to and use of ethics support services, training in ethics and confidence about knowledge (...)
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    Physicians' “Right of Conscience” — Beyond Politics.Azgad Gold - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (1):134-142.
    Recently, the discussion regarding the physicians’ “Right of Conscience” has been on the rise. This issue is often confined to the “reproductive health” arena within the political context. The recent dispute of the Bush-Obama administrations regarding the legal protections of health workers who refuse to provide care that violates their personal beliefs is an example of the political aspects of this dispute. The involvement of the political system automatically shifts the discussion regarding physicians’ ROC into the narrow area (...)
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