Results for 'Philosophy, Maori'

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  1. Maori Philosophy: Indigenous Thinking From Aotearoa.Georgina Stewart - 2020 - New York: Bloomsbury Academic.
    This book is a concise introduction to Maori philosophy, covering the symbolic systems and worldviews of the indigenous people of Aotearoa, New Zealand. This book addresses core philosophical issues including Maori notions of the self, the world, epistemology, the form in which Maori philosophy is conveyed, and whether or not Maori philosophy has a teleological agenda. The book introduces key texts, thinkers and themes and includes pedagogical features including: - A Maori-to-English glossary; - Accessible English (...)
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  2.  15
    Kaupapa Māori, Philosophy and Schools.Georgina Stewart - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (11):1-6.
    Goals for adding philosophy to the school curriculum centre on the perceived need to improve the general quality of critical thinking found in society. School philosophy also provides a means for asking questions of value and purpose about curriculum content across and between subjects, and, furthermore, it affirms the capability of children to think philosophically. Two main routes suggested are the introduction of philosophy as a subject, and processes of facilitating philosophical discussions as a way of establishing classroom ‘communities of (...)
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  3.  15
    The Juxtaposition of Māori Words with English Concepts. ‘Hauora, Well-Being’ as Philosophy.Sharyn Heaton - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (5):460-468.
    Within the New Zealand curriculum, hauora has been co-opted as an underlying and interdependent concept at the heart of the learning area of health and physical education. Hauora is identified as a Māori philosophy of well-being, advocating a Māori world view of hauora. Contemporary understandings of hauora as a Māori philosophy of health are constructed within dominant English-medium curriculum discourses. At first glance the juxtaposition of ‘hauora’ with ‘well-being’, and hauora being defined as ‘a Māori philosophy of health’ seems like (...)
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  4.  16
    The Juxtaposition of Māori Words with English Concepts. ‘Hauora, Well-Being’ as Philosophy.Sharyn Heaton - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-9.
    Within the New Zealand curriculum, hauora has been co-opted as an underlying and interdependent concept at the heart of the learning area of health and physical education. Hauora is identified as a Māori philosophy of well-being, advocating a Māori world view of hauora. Contemporary understandings of hauora as a Māori philosophy of health are constructed within dominant English-medium curriculum discourses. At first glance the juxtaposition of ‘hauora’ with ‘well-being’, and hauora being defined as ‘a Māori philosophy of health’ seems like (...)
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  5. Exploring Maori Values.John Patterson - 1994 - Philosophy East and West 44 (1):183-186.
  6.  10
    Maori Environmental Virtues.John Patterson - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (4):397-409.
    The standard sources for Maori ethics are the traditional narratives. These depict all things in the environment as sharing a common ancestry, and as thereby required, ideally, to exhibit certain virtues of respect and responsibility for each other. These environmental virtues are expressed in terms of distinctively Maori concepts: respect for mauri and tapu, kaitiakitanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, and environmental balance. I briefly explore these Maori environmental virtues, and draw from them some messages for the world at large.
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  7.  26
    Māori in the Kingdom of the Gaze: Subjects or Critics?Carl Mika & Georgina Stewart - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (3).
    For Māori, a real opportunity exists to flesh out some terms and concepts that Western thinkers have adopted and that precede disciplines but necessarily inform them. In this article, we are intent on describing one of these precursory phenomena—Foucault’s Gaze—within a framework that accords with a Māori philosophical framework. Our discussion is focused on the potential and limits of colonised thinking, which has huge implications for such disciplines as education, among others. We have placed Foucault’s Gaze alongside a Māori metaphysics (...)
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  8. Maori Environmental Virtues.John Patterson - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (4):397-409.
    The standard sources for Maori ethics are the traditional narratives. These depict all things in the environment as sharing a common ancestry, and as thereby required, ideally, to exhibit certain virtues of respect and responsibility for each other. These environmental virtues are expressed in terms of distinctively Maori concepts: respect for mauri and tapu, kaitiakitanga, whanaungatanga, manaakitanga, and environmental balance. I briefly explore these Maori environmental virtues, and draw from them some messages for the world at large.
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  9.  16
    Mäori in the Science Curriculum: Developments and Possibilities.Georgina Stewart - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (6):851–870.
    The aim of this paper is to examine the current state of development of Mäori science curriculum policy, and the roles that various discourses have played in shaping these developments. These discussions provide a background for suggestions about a possible future direction, and the presentation of a new concept for Mäori science education.
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  10.  15
    The Maori—a Problem in Social Assimilation.W. S. Dale - 1931 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 9 (3):203 – 213.
  11.  9
    The Maori—A Problem in Social Assimilation.W. S. Dale - 1931 - Australasian Journal of Psychology and Philosophy 9 (3):203-213.
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  12. Refusing the ‘Foolish Wisdom of Resignation’: Kaupapa Māori in Conversation with Adorno.Monika Kirloskar-Steinbach & Carl Mika - 2019 - European Journal of Social Theory:1-18.
    Drawing on select works of Adorno, we will first rehearse his reasons for a rejuvenation of philosophy and apply them to philosophers working on world philosophical traditions. We will then analyse Adorno’s arguments pertaining to the theory–praxis relation to ascertain whether his thought could accommodate a study of world philosophical traditions for the simple reason that they are present in a particular society. Shifting our focus slightly, we reflect upon how current ways of professional philosophizing affect the study of world (...)
     
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  13.  7
    A Maori Il-Logical Ethics of the Dark: An Example with ‘Trauma’.Carl Mika - 2021 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 53 (5):426-435.
    Where has all the hilarity gone – and, with it, the ethics of the dark? In this article, I engage with our metaphysical entities of darkness and nothingness. Undermining and re-declaring are more than just pleasurable exercise for my own indigenous group – Maori; they are ethical necessities that keep one’s certainties in check. Whether it is agreeable or uncomfortable, this acknowledgement of those first beings is necessary if we are to avoid taking ourselves too seriously. I then consider (...)
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  14. The Treaty and the Word: The Colonization of Māori Philosophy.Moana Jackson - 1992 - In Graham Oddie & Roy W. Perrett (eds.), Justice, Ethics, and New Zealand Society. Oxford University Press. pp. 1--10.
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  15.  7
    A Maori Il-Logical Ethics of the Dark: An Example with ‘Trauma’.Carl Mika - forthcoming - Tandf: Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-10.
  16.  11
    Maori Culture and Modern Ethnology.I. L. G. Sutherland - 1927 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 5 (3):186.
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  17.  9
    Maori Culture and Modern Ethnology: A Preliminary Survey, II.I. L. G. Sutherland - 1927 - Australasian Journal of Psychology and Philosophy 5 (3):186-201.
  18.  5
    Maori Culture and Modern Ethnology.I. L. G. Sutherland - 1927 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 5 (2):81.
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  19.  12
    Maori Culture and Modern Ethnology: A Preliminary Survey, I.I. L. G. Sutherland - 1927 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 5 (2):81 – 93.
  20.  4
    Maori Culture and Modern Ethnology: A Preliminary Survey, I.I. L. G. Sutherland - 1927 - Australasian Journal of Psychology and Philosophy 5 (2):81-93.
  21.  4
    Maori Culture and Modern Ethnology: A Preliminary Survey, II.I. L. G. Sutherland - 1927 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 5 (3):186 – 201.
  22.  2
    Academic-Māori-Woman: The Impossible May Take a Little Longer.Georgina Tuari Stewart - forthcoming - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-6.
  23.  14
    “Under Erasure”: Suppressed and Trans-Ethnic Māori Identities.Georgina Tuari Stewart & Makere Stewart-Harawira - 2020 - Journal of World Philosophies 5 (2):1-12.
    The questions raised by Māori identity are not static, but complex and changing over time. The ethnicity known as “Māori” came into existence in colonial New Zealand as a new, pan-tribal identity concept, in response to the trauma of invasion and dispossession by large numbers of mainly British settlers. Ideas of Māori identity have changed over the course of succeeding generations in response to wider social and economic changes. While inter-ethnic marriages and other sexual liaisons have been common throughout the (...)
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  24.  1
    Manahau: Toward an Indigenous Māori Theory of Value.Jason Paul Mika, Kiri Dell, Jamie Newth & Carla Houkamau - 2022 - Philosophy of Management 21 (4):441-463.
    The theoretical challenge posed by this paper is to find a conceptualisation of value for entrepreneurship theory grounded in Indigenous knowledge from a Māori perspective capable of guiding entrepreneurs operating for sustainability and wellbeing. We review Western and Māori theories of value, values, and valuation. We argue that Indigenous concepts of value centre on collective wellbeing as opposed to self-interest, and have spiritual and material elements. The paper proposes a tentative Māori theory of value we call manahau, which combines mana (...)
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  25.  80
    The Environmental Views of John Locke and the Maori People of New Zealand.Stephen J. Duffin - 2004 - Environmental Ethics 26 (4):381-401.
    In recent years, the trend in environmental ethics has been to criticize the traditional Western anthropocentric attitude toward nature. Many environmentalists have looked toward some of the views held by indigenous peoples in various parts of the world and argue that important ecological lessons can be learned by studying their beliefs and attitudes toward nature. The traditional Western viewpoint has been labeled as a form of shallow environmentalism, allowing few rights for anything other than human life. In contrast, indigenous peoples (...)
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  26.  77
    Science in the Māori‐Medium Curriculum: Assessment of Policy Outcomes in Pūtaiao Education.Georgina Stewart - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (7):724-741.
    This second research paper on science education in Māori‐medium school contexts complements an earlier article published in this journal. Science and science education are related domains in society and in state schooling in which there have always been particularly large discrepancies in participation and achievement by Māori. In 1995 a Kaupapa Māori analysis of this situation challenged New Zealand science education academics to deal with ‘the Māori crisis’ within science education. Recent NCEA results suggest Pūtaiao education, for which a national (...)
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  27. Virtue Ethics and Maori Ethics.Roy W. Perrett & John Patterson - 1991 - Philosophy East and West 41 (2):185-202.
  28.  44
    Theoretical Claims and Empirical Evidence in Maori Education Discourse.Elizabeth Rata - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (10):1060-1072.
    Post‐Marxist critical sociology of education has influenced the development of indigenous Maori educational theory and research. Its effects are examined in four claims made for Maori education by indigenous theorists. The claims are: indigenous kaupapa Maori education is a revolutionary initiative; it is a cultural solution to Maori educational under‐achievement; it has reversed the decline of the Maori language; it provides a valid educational alternative for an ethnically and culturally distinctive population. The analysis suggests that (...)
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  29.  4
    Negentropy for the Anthropocene; Stiegler, Maori and Exosomatic Memory.Ruth Irwin & Te Haumoana White - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (5):532-544.
    Exosomatic memory is a crucial phase in the evolution of humanity because it enables learning to take place across groups and generations rather than exclusively through lived experience or one on one transmission. Exosomatic memory is the attribution of knowledge to objects, such as art or writing, which allows epistemology to be transmitted beyond the individual to subsequent generations of people. Exosomatic memory is the key to the transmission of culture and knowledge, beyond the individual who learns exclusively from personal (...)
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  30.  20
    The ‘Hau’ of Research: Mauss Meets Kaupapa Māori.Georgina Stewart - 2017 - Journal of World Philosophies 2 (1):1-11.
    ‘The Gift’ is the English title of a small book first published in French in 1925 by sociologist Marcel Mauss, which catalyzed an ongoing debate linked to a wide range of scholarship. Mauss’s gift theory included the Māori example of the ‘hau of the gift’ which Mauss explained as a spiritual force, seeking to return to its original owner or place of origin. This article brings a critical Māori perspective to Mauss’ notion of the hau of the gift, in an (...)
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  31.  3
    Refusing the ‘Foolish Wisdom of Resignation’: Kaupapa Māori in Conversation with Adorno.Carl Mika & Monika Kirloskar-Steinbach - 2020 - European Journal of Social Theory 23 (4):532-549.
    Drawing on select works of Adorno, we will first rehearse his reasons for a rejuvenation of philosophy and apply them to philosophers working on world philosophical traditions. We will then analyse Adorno’s arguments pertaining to the theory–praxis relation to ascertain whether his thought could accommodate a study of world philosophical traditions for the simple reason that they are present in a particular society. Shifting our focus slightly, we reflect upon how current ways of professional philosophizing affect the study of world (...)
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  32.  24
    The Extra Strand of the Māori Science Curriculum.Georgina Stewart - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (10):1175-1182.
    This paper comments on the process of re-development of the Maori-medium Science (Pūtaiao) curriculum, as part of overall curriculum development in Aotearoa New Zealand. A significant difference from the English Science curriculum was the addition of an ‘extra strand’ covering the history and philosophy of science. It is recommended that this strand be taught by means of narratives (i.e. using ‘narrative pedagogy’) in order to avoid a superficial didacticism that succumbs to the traditional notion of science curriculum content as (...)
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  33.  10
    Subjecting Ourselves to Madness: A Maori Approach to Unseen Instruction.Carl Mika - 2021 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 53 (7):719-727.
    Where does the object or idea begin, and where does it end as ‘unseen’? There is scope in Maori philosophising to think of the seen object or its idea in various ways, including as materially constituting the self and the rest of the world; as incomplete for a mental representation; as constituted in itself by the unseen ; and as co-constitutional with nothingness and presence. The possibilities of the seen object are several, especially if the concept of ‘seen’ is (...)
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  34.  42
    Exploring Whakaaro: A Way of Responsive Thinking in Maori Research.Carl Mika & Kim Southey - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (8):795-803.
    The experience of researching as a Māori student within academia will often raise questions about how and whether the student’s research privileges Māori world views and articulates culturally specific epistemologies. This study offers some theorising, from the perspectives of a Maori doctoral student and her Maori supervisor, on the metaphysical nature of research for Maori. It emphasises that there is a space for speculative, creative and responsive thinking as a central method in the student’s doctoral research and (...)
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  35. King Potatau: An Account of the Life of Potatau Te Wherowhero, the First Maori King.Pei Te Hurinui - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
     
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  36.  14
    ‘What If Value and Rights Lie Foundationally in Groups?’ The Maori Case.Andrew Sharp - 1999 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (2):1-28.
    Liberal writers share the intuition that the fundamental moral particle is the human individual, not the group. In this paper, I adopt the opposing intuition which many, including the indigenous Maori of New Zealand, say they feel: that it is the group that is fundamental, rather than the individual. I attempt to work out the doctrine which results from that intuition and call it?group foundationalism?. I then seek to explore the tenability of group foundationalism, not from the perspective of (...)
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  37.  18
    ‘What If Value and Rights Lie Foundationally in Groups?’ The Maori Case.Sharp Andrew - 1999 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 2 (2):22-23.
  38.  25
    Technology, Education and Indigenous Peoples: The Case of Maori.James D. Marshall - 2000 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 32 (1):119–131.
  39.  18
    Indigenous Language Rights and Political Theory: The Case of Te Reo Māori.Roy W. Perrett - 2000 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 78 (3):405 – 417.
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  40.  11
    Straying Beyond the Boundaries of Belief: Maori Epistemologies Inside the Curriculum.Cherryl Waerea‐I.‐Te‐Rangi Smith - 2000 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 32 (1):43-51.
  41. People of the Land: A Pacific Philosophy.John Patterson - 2000 - Dunmore Press.
    This sequel to Exploring Maori Values develops the idea that humans can and need to become 'people of the land' in the Maori sense, developing a harmonious interdependence with the environment in which we live rather than continuing to dominate it. Although arising out of Maori concepts, this is a model for human life which is available to any culture.
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  42. Dictionary of World Philosophy.A. Pablo Iannone - 2001 - Routledge.
    The _Dictionary of World Philosophy_ covers the diverse and challenging terminology, concepts, schools and traditions of the vast field of world philosophy. Providing an extremely comprehensive resource and an essential point of reference in a complex and expanding field of study the _Dictionary_ covers all major subfields of the discipline. Key features: * Cross-references are used to highlight interconnections and the cross-cultural diffusion and adaptation of terms which has taken place over time * The user is led from specific terms (...)
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  43. A Practical Guide to World Philosophies: Selves, Worlds, and Ways of Knowing.Monika Kirloskar-Steinbach - 2021 - New York: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Offering a teaching guide for instructors looking to broaden their view of philosophy, diversify their teaching, or discover a new way of thinking about our place in the world, this book explores how Anglo-American, Chinese, Indian, African, Islamic, and Maori thinkers have all addressed fundamental questions in philosophy. Featuring teaching notes, discussion questions, and a list of further reading, this is a book packed with the background, guidance, and tools required to teach different philosophies.
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  44.  25
    Symposium: »Is Reason a Neutral Tool in Comparative Philosophy?«.Jonardon Ganeri, Mustafa Abu Sway, Paul Boghossian & Stewart Georgina - 2016 - Confluence: Journal of World Philosophies 4:133-186.
    Is Reason a Neutral Tool in Comparative Philosophy? In his answer to the symposium’s question, Jonardon Ganeri develops a »Manifesto for [a] Re:emergent Philosophy.« Tracking changes in the understanding of ›comparative philosophy,‹ he sketches how today’s world of academic philosophy seems to be set to enter an »age of re:emergence« in which world philosophies will be studied through modes of global participation. In their responses, the symposium’s discussants tease out implications of this Manifesto for different issues: While Mustafa Abu Sway (...)
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  45.  2
    Cognitive Science: A Multidisciplinary Journal of Anthropology, Artificial Intelligence, Education, Linguistics, Neuroscience, Philosophy, Psychology.Robert L. Goldstone & John R. Anderson - 2001 - Routledge.
    The Dictionary of World Philosophy covers the diverse and challenging terminology, concepts, schools and traditions of the vast field of world philosophy. Providing an extremely comprehensive resource and an essential point of reference in a complex and expanding field of study the Dictionary covers all major subfields of the discipline. Key features: * Cross-references are used to highlight interconnections and the cross-cultural diffusion and adaptation of terms which has taken place over time * The user is led from specific terms (...)
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  46. Tribal Epistemologies: Essays in the Philosophy of Anthropology.Helmut Wautischer - 1998 - Routledge.
    First published in 1998, this collection of ten essays transforms our understanding of both the role of philosophical anthropology in modern world philosophy and the origins of tribal knowledge in their relation to contemporary assessments of cognition and consciousness. Ethnographic data from geographically distant cultures - such as the Maori of New Zealand, the Fore of New Guinea, the Sea Nomads of the Andaman, the Cowlitz of North America, the Maya, Australian Aborigines, Siberian Shamans - are carefully crafted toward (...)
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  47.  25
    Charting Just Futures for Aotearoa New Zealand: Philosophy for and Beyond the Covid-19 Pandemic.Tim Mulgan, Sophia Enright, Marco Grix, Ushana Jayasuriya, Tēvita O. Ka‘ili, Adriana M. Lear, 'Aisea N. Matthew Māhina, 'Ōkusitino Māhina, John Matthewson, Andrew Moore, Emily C. Parke, Vanessa Schouten & Krushil Watene - forthcoming - Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand.
    The global pandemic needs to mark a turning point for the peoples of Aotearoa New Zealand. How can we make sure that our culturally diverse nation charts an equitable and sustainable path through and beyond this new world? In a less affluent future, how can we ensure that all New Zealanders have fair access to opportunities? One challenge is to preserve the sense of common purpose so critical to protecting each other in the face of Covid-19. How can we centre (...)
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  48.  23
    Justice, Ethics, and New Zealand Society.Graham Oddie & Roy W. Perrett (eds.) - 1992 - Oxford University Press.
    What is sovereignty? Was it ceded to the Crown in the Treaty of Waitangi? If land was unjustly confiscated over a century ago, should it be returned? Is an ecosystem valuable in itself, or only because of its value to people? Does a property right entail a right to destroy? Can collectives (such as tribes) bear moral responsibility? Do they have moral rights? If so, what are the implications for the justice system? These questions are essentially philosophical, yet all thoughtful (...)
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  49.  34
    A Counter-Colonial Speculation on Elizabeth Rata’s –Ism.Carl Mika - 2016 - Journal of World Philosophies 1 (1):1-12.
    In Maori thought, the possibility exists for a sort of lateral thinking that does not necessarily directly respond to another’s utterance or opinion but that considers some of the creative and arbitrary themes that arise. In this article, I employ this counter-colonial speculation, keeping in mind a Maori worldview whilst thinking in the wake of Elizabeth Rata’s “Ethnic Ideologies in New Zealand Education: What’s Wrong with Kaupapa Maori?” The speculative powers that Maori have at our disposal (...)
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  50.  47
    Overcoming ‘Being’ in Favour of Knowledge: The Fixing Effect of ‘Mātauranga’.Carl Te Hira Mika - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (10):1080-1092.
    It is common to hear Māori discuss primordial states of Being, yet in colonisation those very central beliefs are forced into weaker utterances. In this process those utterances merely conform to a colonised agenda. ‘Mātauranga’, a tidy term that overwhelmingly refers to an epistemological knowing of the world, colludes nicely with its English equivalent, ‘knowledge’, to further colonise those core contemplations of Being. Its plausibility relies on an orderly regard of things in the world. In education, historical and current practices (...)
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