Results for 'Phillip Good'

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  1. The Good in Happiness.Jonathan Phillips, Sven Nyholm & Shen-yi Liao - 2014 - In Tania Lombrozo, Shaun Nichols & Joshua Knobe (eds.), Oxford Studies in Experimental Philosophy, Volume 1. Oxford University Press. pp. 253–293.
    There has been a long history of arguments over whether happiness is anything more than a particular set of psychological states. On one side, some philosophers have argued that there is not, endorsing a descriptive view of happiness. Affective scientists have also embraced this view and are reaching a near consensus on a definition of happiness as some combination of affect and life-satisfaction. On the other side, some philosophers have maintained an evaluative view of happiness, on which being happy involves (...)
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  2. Eavesdropping: What is it good for?Jonathan Phillips & Matthew Mandelkern - forthcoming - Semantics and Pragmatics.
    Eavesdropping judgments (judgments about truth, retraction, and consistency across contexts) about epistemic modals have been used in recent years to argue for a radical thesis: that truth is assessment-relative. We argue that judgments for 'I think that p' pattern in strikingly similar ways to judgments for 'Might p' and 'Probably p'. We argue for this by replicating three major experiments involving the latter and adding a condition with the form 'I think that p', showing that subjects respond in the same (...)
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  3.  1
    Soul of goodness: transform grievous hurt, betrayal, and setback into love, joy, and compassion.Christopher Phillips - 2022 - Guilford, Connecticut: Prometheus Books.
    This moving, insightful and ultimately hopeful and helpful blend of memoir and philosophical exploration begins in Christopher Phillips's native stomping grounds of the tiny volcanic island of Nisyros, Greece and unfurls through space and time as the author explores the connections between his immediate circumstances and the eternal wisdom of popular philosophers.
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  4.  9
    Value and the Good Life.Phillip L. Quinn - 2002 - Faith and Philosophy 19 (3):385-390.
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  5.  10
    Can Which Good Man Know Himself?D. Z. Phillips - 1995 - Philosophical Investigations 18 (2):156-161.
  6.  8
    The Good and Evil of Health Policy: Medicaid Expansion, Republican Governors, and Moral Intuitions.Michael D. Rozier & Phillip M. Singer - 2021 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 12 (3):145-154.
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  7. The Moral Good as a Relation between Persons.I. W. Phillips, A. Macbeath & H. F. Hallett - 1939 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 18:106-178.
     
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  8.  51
    Perfectionism and the Common Good: Themes in the Philosophy of T.H. Green (review).Phillip Ferreira - 2005 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (3):369-370.
    Phillip Ferreira - Perfectionism and the Common Good: Themes in the Philosophy of T.H. Green - Journal of the History of Philosophy 43:3 Journal of the History of Philosophy 43.3 369-370 David O. Brink. Perfectionism and the Common Good: Themes in the Philosophy of T. H. Green. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2003. Pp. xiv + 139. Cloth, $27.50. The British idealists have not fared well during the past century. Still, there has been in recent years a renewed interest (...)
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  9.  16
    Does It Pay to Be Good?D. Z. Phillips - 1965 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 65:45 - 60.
    D. Z. Phillips; III—Does it Pay to be Good?, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Volume 65, Issue 1, 1 June 1965, Pages 45–60, https://doi.org/10.1093/aris.
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  10.  10
    III—Does it Pay to be Good?D. Z. Phillips - 1965 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 65 (1):45-60.
    D. Z. Phillips; III—Does it Pay to be Good?, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Volume 65, Issue 1, 1 June 1965, Pages 45–60, https://doi.org/10.1093/aris.
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  11.  4
    Symposium: The Moral Good as a Relation between Persons.I. W. Phillips, A. Macbeath & H. F. Hallett - 1939 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 18 (1):106 - 178.
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  12.  18
    God and Other Spirits: Intimations of Transcendence in Christian Experience.Phillip H. Wiebe - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    Many people believe in angels and evil spirits, and popular culture abounds in talk about encounters with such entities. Yet the question of the existence of such spirits is ignored in the academy. Even the Christian Church, which one might expect to show keen interest in transcendent realities, does not appear to be paying much attention. In this book Phillip Wiebe defends the plausibility of the traditional Christian claim that spirits are real. Wiebe examines descriptions of encounters with both (...)
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  13. The Myth of Evil: Demonizing the Enemy.Phillip Cole - 2006 - Praeger.
    Terrorism, torture, and the problems of evil -- Diabolical evil, searching for Satan -- Philosophies of evil -- Communities of fear -- The enemy within -- Bad seeds -- The character of evil -- Facing the Holocaust -- Twenty-first-century mythologies.
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  14. Defining 'business ethics': Like nailing jello to a wall. [REVIEW]Phillip V. Lewis - 1985 - Journal of Business Ethics 4 (5):377 - 383.
    Business ethics is a topic receiving much attention in the literature. However, the term 'business ethics' is not adequately defined. Typical definitions refer to the rightness or wrongness of behavior, but not everyone agrees on what is morally right or wrong, good or bad, ethical or unethical. To complicate the problem, nearly all available definitions exist at highly abstract levels. This article focuses on contemporary definitions of business ethics by business writers and professionals and on possible areas of agreement (...)
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  15. Defining ‘business ethics’: Like nailing jello to a wall.Phillip V. Lewis - 1985 - Journal of Business Ethics 4 (5):377-383.
    Business ethics is a topic receiving much attention in the literature. However, the term 'business ethics' is not adequately defined. Typical definitions refer to the rightness or wrongness of behavior, but not everyone agrees on what is morally right or wrong, good or bad, ethical or unethical. To complicate the problem, nearly all available definitions exist at highly abstract levels. This article focuses on contemporary definitions of business ethics by business writers and professionals and on possible areas of agreement (...)
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  16.  5
    Chapter 6. Community and the Good Life in Classical Athens.Derek L. Phillips - 1995 - In Looking Backward: A Critical Appraisal of Communitarian Thought. Princeton University Press. pp. 122-148.
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  17.  5
    Inner Grace: Augustine in the Traditions of Plato and Paul.Phillip Cary - 2008 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This book is, along with Outward Signs, a sequel to Phillip Cary's Augustine and the Invention of the Inner Self. In this work, Cary traces the development of Augustine's epochal doctrine of grace, arguing that it does not represent a rejection of Platonism in favor of a more purely Christian point of view DL a turning from Plato to Paul, as it is often portrayed. Instead, Augustine reads Paul and other Biblical texts in light of his Christian Platonist inwardness, (...)
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  18.  2
    Outward Signs: The Powerlessness of External Things in Augustine's Thought.Phillip Cary - 2008 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This book is, along with Inner Grace, a sequel to Phillip Cary's Augustine and the Invention of the Inner Self. In this work, Cary argues that Augustine invented the expressionist type of semiotics widely taken for granted in modernity, where words are outward signs giving inadequate expression to what lies within the soul. Augustine uses this new semiotics to explain why the authority of external teaching, including Biblical authority, is useful but temporary, designed to lead to a more permanent (...)
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  19.  41
    Experiencing Silence.Phillip John Meadows - 2020 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 50 (2):238-250.
    This paper identifies three claims that feature prominently in recent discussions concerning the experience of silence: that experiences of silence are the most “negative” of perceptions, that we do not hear silences because those silences cause our experiences of silence, and that to hear silence is to hear a temporal region devoid of sound. The principal proponents of this approach are Phillips and Soteriou, and here I present a series of objections to common elements of their attempts to place these (...)
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  20. Isolation and Unification: The Realist Analysis of Possible Worlds.Phillip Bricker - 1996 - Philosophical Studies 84 (2-3):225 - 238.
    If realism about possible worlds is to succeed in eliminating primitive modality, it must provide an 'analysis' of possible world: nonmodal criteria for demarcating one world from another. This David Lewis has done. Lewis holds, roughly, that worlds are maximal unified regions of logical space. So far, so good. But what Lewis means by 'unification' is too narrow, I think, in two different ways. First, for Lewis, all worlds are (almost) 'globally' unified: at any world, (almost) every part is (...)
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  21.  28
    Green’s Attack on Formal Logic.Phillip Ferreira - 2003 - Bradley Studies 9 (1):40-51.
    Despite renewed interest in T.H. Green’s social and political theory, little attention has as yet been given to his metaphysics and epistemology — even more neglected, though, are his views on logical matters. It is unclear why this is. I suspect that the obscurity of his discussion has much to do with it. Green routinely refers to writers in whom there is little interest today; and a good deal of effort is required to penetrate his technical vocabulary. Still, I (...)
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  22. 'Anonymus Iamblichi, On Excellence (Peri Aretês): A Lost Defense of Democracy'.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2020 - In D. Wolfsdorf (ed.), Early Greek Ethics. Oxford, UK: pp. 262-92.
    In 1889, the German philologist Friedrich Blass isolated a section of Chapter 20 from Iamblichus’ Exhortation to Philosophy (mid- or late 3rd Century CE) as an extract from a lost sophistic or philosophical treatise from the late 5th Century BCE. In this article, I introduce the text, which is now known as 'Anonymus Iamblichi' (or 'the anonymous work preserved in Iamblichus') by appeal to its two main contexts (source preservation and original historical composition), translate and discuss all eight surviving fragments (...)
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  23.  10
    Rates and Predictors of Professional Interpreting Provision for Patients With Limited English Proficiency in the Emergency Department and Inpatient Ward.Ryan Jennifer, Abbato Samantha, Greer Ristan, Vayne-Bossert Petra & Good Phillip - 2017 - Inquiry: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing 54:004695801773998.
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  24. Empedocles Democraticus: Hellenistic Biography at the Intersection of Philosophy and Politics.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2016 - In Mauro Bonazzi & Stefan Schorn (eds.), Bios Philosophos: Philosophy in Ancient Greek Biography. 2300 Turnhout, Belgium: pp. 37-71.
    Diogenes Laertius (8.63-6) preserves a fascinating account of the Presocratic philosopher Empedocles' life. There, drawing on evidence from Aristotle, Xanthus, and Timaeus of Tauromenium, the biographer provides several anecdotes which are meant to demonstrate how Empedocles had, contrary to expectation, been a democratic philosopher - a paradox of itself in Ancient Greece. This article unpacks the complex web woven by Diogenes and argues that there is no good reason to assume that Empedocles was indeed a democratic philosopher, and moreover, (...)
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  25. Austerity and Illusion.Craig French & Ian Phillips - 2020 - Philosophers' Imprint 20 (15):1-19.
    Many contemporary theorists charge that naïve realists are incapable of accounting for illusions. Various sophisticated proposals have been ventured to meet this charge. Here, we take a different approach and dispute whether the naïve realist owes any distinctive account of illusion. To this end, we begin with a simple, naïve account of veridical perception. We then examine the case that this account cannot be extended to illusions. By reconstructing an explicit version of this argument, we show that it depends critically (...)
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  26. In the Interests of Others an Essay in Moral Philosophy.Phillip Montague - 1992 - Springer.
    Are we morally required to act in the interests of others? Does our worth as persons depend in any way on our valuing the good of others? These questions, illustrative of those addressed in this book, concern the relevance of other-interested considerations -- of facts about what is good or bad for others -- to the moral status of persons and their actions. Pursuing answers to such questions is not only interesting and important in its own right, but (...)
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  27.  80
    The Problem of Evil and the Problem of God.Dewi Zephaniah Phillips - 2004 - Scm Press.
    "This book is D.Z. Phillips' systematic attempt to discuss the problem of evil. He argues that the problem is inextricably linked to our conception of God. In an effort to distinguish between logical and existential problems of evil, that inheritance offers us distorted accounts of God's omnipotence and will. In his interlude, Phillips argues that, as a result, God is ridiculed out of existence, and found unfit to plead before the bar of decency. However, Phillips elucidates a neglected tradition in (...)
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  28. Senses of Humor as Political Virtues.Phillip Deen - 2018 - Metaphilosophy 49 (3):371-387.
    This article discusses whether a sense of humor is a political virtue. It argues that a sense of humor is conducive to the central political virtues. We must first, however, delineate different types of humor (benevolent or malicious) and the different political virtues (sociability, prudence, and justice) to which they correspond. Generally speaking, a sense of humor is politically virtuous when it encourages good will toward fellow citizens, an awareness of the limits of power, and a tendency not to (...)
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  29. A Call for Inclusion in the Pragmatic Justification of Democracy.Phillip Deen - 2009 - Contemporary Pragmatism 6 (1):131-151.
    Despite accepting Robert Talisse's pluralist critique of models of democratic legitimacy that rely on substantive images of the common good, there is insufficient reason to dismiss Dewey's thought from future attempts at a pragmatist philosophy of democracy. First, Dewey's use of substantive arguments does not prevent him from also making epistemic arguments that proceed from the general conditions of inquiry. Second, Dewey's account of the mean-ends transaction shows that ends-in-view are developed from within the process of democratic inquiry, not (...)
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  30.  3
    Friedrich Nietzsche: Jenseits von Gut und Böse ed. by Marcus Andreas Born.Phillip H. Roth - 2016 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 47 (2):311-314.
    It is definitely a welcome contribution to Nietzsche scholarship that a volume on Beyond Good and Evil has been published in the German series Klassiker Auslegen, established by Ottfried Höffe. The series aims at providing cooperative commentaries by leading scholars in the field on the most important works in the history of philosophy. As with the other “classics” that have been covered, the order of contributions follows the order of the original publication; in the case of Beyond Good (...)
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  31. D. Z. Phillips' problems with evil and with God.William Hasker - 2007 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 61 (3):151 - 160.
    It is widely held that the logical problem of evil, which alleges an inconsistency between the existence of evil and that of an omnipotent and morally perfect God, has been solved. D. Z. Phillips thinks this is a mistake. In The Problem of Evil and the Problem of God, he argues that, within the generally assumed framework, “neither the proposition ’God is omnipotent’ nor the proposition ‘God is perfectly good’ can get off the ground.” Thus, the problem of evil (...)
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  32.  12
    Contradiction, Contrariety and Inference.Phillip Ferreira - 1998 - Bradley Studies 4 (2):123-144.
    F.H. Bradley has been characterized by many commentators as something of a sceptic. And the reason why Bradley is often cast in this light is, I believe, largely a result of his theory of relations. As even the casual student is aware, the relational nature of all judgment leads, on Bradley’s analysis, to an infinite and, many have claimed, “vicious” regress. And when we add to this Bradley’s claim that all assertion is, at some level, “contradictory”, there seems to be (...)
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  33.  33
    Stress in political theory.Phillip C. Chapman - 1969 - Ethics 80 (1):38-49.
    The article attempts to give a coherent expression to a recurrent theme in the history of political theory. The theme is that men and communities must be subjected to stress in various forms (e.g., Poverty, Insecurity, Conflict, Dissension) in order to maintain whatever faculties, qualities, capabilities and institutions they regard as (a) practically necessary in the long run, or (b) an essential part of their conception of a good life. The ideas dealt with have been drawn from philosophers, political (...)
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  34.  25
    The Moral Status of Human Zygotes.Phillip Montague - 1978 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 8 (4):697 - 705.
    A little-discussed aspect of the “conservative” position on abortion involves the claim that human beings exist at all stages of gestation — that even the human fertilized ovum is a human being. There are good reasons of both a practical and theoretical nature why this particular idea has received so little attention in the abortion controversy. On the practical side there is the fact that zygotes are rarely if ever the subjects of abortion decisions; and on the theoretical side, (...)
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  35.  22
    Conceptions of Scientific Literacy: Identifying and Evaluating Their Programmatic Elements.Stephen P. Norris, Linda M. Phillips & David Burns - 2014 - In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. pp. 1317-1344.
    Programmatic concepts have elements that point in a valued direction or name a desired goal. We provide a detailed analysis of the nature of programmatic concepts and cite examples of the programmatic elements found in conceptions of scientific literacy. Next we describe what values underlie these elements and what theories of value might be brought to bear in assessing them. We present an analysis of approximately 70 conceptions of scientific literacy found in the literature since the year 2000. We identify (...)
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  36. Moral judgments and intuitions about freedom.Jonathan Phillips & Joshua Knobe - 2009 - Psychological Inquiry 20 (1):30-36.
    Reeder’s article offers a new and intriguing approach to the study of people’s ordinary understanding of freedom and constraint. On this approach, people use information about freedom and constraint as part of a quasi-scientific effort to make accurate inferences about an agent’s motives. Their beliefs about the agent’s motives then affect a wide variety of further psychological processes, including the process whereby they arrive at moral judgments. In illustrating this new approach, Reeder cites an elegant study he conducted a number (...)
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  37.  57
    D. Z. Phillips and reasonable belief.John H. Whittaker - 2008 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 63 (1-3):103-129.
    As an illustration of what Phillips called the "heterogeneity of sense," this essay concentrates on differences in what is meant by a "reason for belief." Sometimes saying that a belief is reasonable simply commends the belief's unquestioned acceptance as a part of what we understand as a sensible outlook. Here the standard picture of justifying truth claims on evidential grounds breaks down; and it also breaks down in cases of fundamental moral and religious disagreement, where the basic beliefs that we (...)
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  38.  16
    Order From Disorder: Proclus' Doctrine of Evil and its Roots in Ancient Platonism.John Phillips - 2007 - Brill.
    This book examines Proclus' doctrine of evil in light of the tradition of exegesis of Plato's treatment of evil within the schools of ancient Platonism, from ...
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  39. When good observers go bad: Change blindness, inattentional blindness, and visual experience.Ronald A. Rensink - 2000 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 6 (9).
    Several studies (e.g., Becklen & Cervone, 1983; Mack & Rock, 1998; Neisser & Becklen, 1975) have found that observers attending to a particular object or event often fail to report the presence of unexpected items. This has been interpreted as inattentional blindness (IB), a failure to see unattended items (Mack & Rock, 1998). Meanwhile, other studies (e.g., Pashler, 1988; Phillips, 1974; Rensink et al., 1997; Simons, 1996) have found that observers often fail to report the presence of large changes in (...)
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  40.  38
    D. Z. Phillips’ problems with evil and with God.William Hasker - 2007 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 61 (3):151-160.
    It is widely held that the logical problem of evil, which alleges an inconsistency between the existence of evil and that of an omnipotent and morally perfect God, has been solved. D. Z. Phillips thinks this is a mistake. In "The Problem of Evil and the Problem of God," he argues that, within the generally assumed framework, "neither the proposition 'God is omnipotent' nor the proposition 'God is perfectly good' can get off the ground." Thus, the problem of evil (...)
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  41.  12
    In touch with the facts: epistemological disjunctivism and the rationalisation of belief.Edgar Phillips - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    The idea of believing for a good reason has both normative and psychological content. How are these related? Recently, a number of authors have defended a ‘disjunctivist’ view of rationalisation, on which a good reason can make a subject’s responses to it intelligible in a way that mere ‘apparent reasons’ cannot. However, little has been said about the possible epistemological significance of this view or its relationship to more familiar forms of disjunctivism in the philosophy of perception. This (...)
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  42.  11
    New Perspectives on the History of Life Sciences and Agriculture.Sharon Kingsland & Denise Phillips (eds.) - 2015 - Springer Verlag.
    This chapter examines biological practice in relation to agricultural management at the Dutch botanical garden at Buitenzorg, Java. Melchior Treub, Buitenzorg’s director from 1880 to 1909, fundamentally transformed the garden by expanding and developing its facilities, partly in response to the need to control diseases of both plants and humans. The Garden attracted foreign scientists from around the world and became a model for biological stations elsewhere. Garden scientists also led in the disciplinary transformation of morphological science around 1900. In (...)
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  43. Why future-bias isn't rationally evaluable.Callie K. Phillips - 2021 - Res Philosophica 98 (4):573-596.
    Future-bias is preferring some lesser future good to a greater past good because it is in the future, or preferring some greater past pain to some lesser future pain because it is in the past. Most of us think that this bias is rational. I argue that no agents have future-biased preferences that are rationally evaluable—that is, evaluable as rational or irrational. Given certain plausible assumptions about rational evaluability, either we must find a new conception of future-bias that (...)
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  44. Photography and causation: Responding to Scruton's scepticism.Dawn M. Phillips - 2009 - British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (4):327-340.
    According to Roger Scruton, it is not possible for photographs to be representational art. Most responses to Scruton’s scepticism are versions of the claim that Scruton disregards the extent to which intentionality features in photography; but these cannot force him to give up his notion of the ideal photograph. My approach is to argue that Scruton has misconstrued the role of causation in his discussion of photography. I claim that although Scruton insists that the ideal photograph is defined by its (...)
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  45. Translation of Phillip Melanchthon's Oration on the Praise of the Scholastic Life.D. P. Fahrenthold - 2021 - In Mark J. Boone, Rose M. Cothren, Kevin C. Neece & Jaclyn S. Parrish (eds.), The Good, the True, the Beautiful: A Multidisciplinary Tribute to Dr. David K. Naugle. Pickwick.
     
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  46.  31
    Do We Know Whether Researchers and Reviewers are Estimating Risk and Benefit Accurately?Spencer Phillips Hey & Jonathan Kimmelman - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (8):609-617.
    Accurate estimation of risk and benefit is integral to good clinical research planning, ethical review, and study implementation. Some commentators have argued that various actors in clinical research systems are prone to biased or arbitrary risk/benefit estimation. In this commentary, we suggest the evidence supporting such claims is very limited. Most prior work has imputed risk/benefit beliefs based on past behavior or goals, rather than directly measuring them. We describe an approach – forecast analysis – that would enable direct (...)
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  47.  48
    Assay Sensitivity and the Epistemic Contexts of Clinical Trials.Spencer Phillips Hey & Charles Weijer - 2013 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 56 (1):1-17.
    In February 2010, the World Medical Association hosted an international symposium on the ethics of placebo controls in clinical trials (WMA 2010). Despite years of debate, ethicists, clinical trialists, and policy makers remain divided over the ethical acceptability of using placebos in research when a proven, effective treatment is available. The protracted nature of this problem is due, at least in part, to a perceived conflict between the opposing demands placed on clinical research by science and ethics. A good, (...)
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  48.  8
    Young’s Social Connection Model and Corporate Responsibility.Robert Phillips & Judith Schrempf-Stirling - 2022 - Philosophy of Management 21 (3):315-336.
    Recent structural innovations in global commerce present difficult challenges for legacy understandings of responsibility. The rise of outsourcing, sub-contracting, and mobile app-based platforms have dramatically restructured relationships between and among economic actors. Though not entirely new, the remarkable rise in the prevalence of these “not-quite-arm’s-length” relationships present difficulties for conceptions of responsibility based on interrogating the past for specifiable actions by blameworthy actors. Iris Marion Young invites investigation of a “social connection model of responsibility” (SCMR) that is, in many ways, (...)
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  49. Blame, Forgiveness, and Honor in Aristotle and Beyond.Carissa Phillips-Garrett - 2017 - Dissertation, Rice University
    Many contemporary discussions of forgiveness assume forgiveness is fundamentally admirable. Examining Aristotle’s account, however, demonstrates that there is a tension between desert and forgiveness that is often overlooked in contemporary discussions. Through examining the neglected concept of sungnōmē, which forestalls blame, I conclude that Aristotelian blame is justified only on grounds of fairness. This conclusion is evidence that Aristotelian blame is not merely an instrumental or descriptive tool, but rather a way of holding agents morally accountable. Through examining the emphasis (...)
     
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  50.  27
    Management of tinnitus in English NHS Audiology Departments: an evaluation of current practice.Derek J. Hoare, Phillip E. Gander, Luke Collins, Sandra Smith & Deborah A. Hall - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (2):326-334.
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