Results for 'Philip May'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
  1.  51
    A Plea for Risk: Philip A. Ebert & Simon Robertson.Philip A. Ebert & Simon Robertson - 2013 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 73:45-64.
    Mountaineering is a dangerous activity. For many mountaineers, part of its very attraction is the risk, the thrill of danger. Yet mountaineers are often regarded as reckless or even irresponsible for risking their lives. In this paper, we offer a defence of risk-taking in mountaineering. Our discussion is organised around the fact that mountaineers and non-mountaineers often disagree about how risky mountaineering really is. We hope to cast some light on the nature of this disagreement – and to argue that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2. The Advancement of Science: Science Without Legend, Objectivity Without Illusions.Philip Kitcher - 1993 - Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    During the last three decades, reflections on the growth of scientific knowledge have inspired historians, sociologists, and some philosophers to contend that scientific objectivity is a myth. In this book, Kitcher attempts to resurrect the notions of objectivity and progress in science by identifying both the limitations of idealized treatments of growth of knowledge and the overreactions to philosophical idealizations. Recognizing that science is done not by logically omniscient subjects working in isolation, but by people with a variety of personal (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   652 citations  
  3.  28
    It May Be Harder Than We Thought, but Political Diversity Will Improve Social Psychological Science.Jarret T. Crawford, José L. Duarte, Jonathan Haidt, Lee Jussim, Charlotta Stern & Philip E. Tetlock - 2015 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4. On the People's Terms: A Republican Theory and Model of Democracy.Philip Pettit - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    According to republican theory, we are free persons to the extent that we are protected and secured in the same fundamental choices, on the same public basis, as one another. But there is no public protection or security without a coercive state. Does this mean that any freedom we enjoy is a superficial good that presupposes a deeper, political form of subjection? Philip Pettit addresses this crucial question in On the People's Terms. He argues that state coercion will not (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   98 citations  
  5. Deliberative Democracy and the Discursive Dilemma.Philip Pettit - 2001 - Philosophical Issues 11 (1):268-299.
    Taken as a model for how groups should make collective judgments and decisions, the ideal of deliberative democracy is inherently ambiguous. Consider the idealised case where it is agreed on all sides that a certain conclusion should be endorsed if and only if certain premises are admitted. Does deliberative democracy recommend that members of the group debate the premises and then individually vote, in the light of that debate, on whether or not to support the conclusion? Or does it recommend (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   120 citations  
  6.  87
    Just Freedom: A Moral Compass for a Complex World.Philip Pettit - 2014 - W. W. Norton & Company.
    Freedom, in Philip Pettit's provocative analysis, "requires more than just being left alone." In Just Freedom, a succint articulation of the republican philosophy for which he is renowned, Pettit builds a theory of universal freedom as nondenomination. Seen through this lens, even societies that consider themselves free may find their political arrangements lacking. Do those arrangements protect people's liberties equally? Are they subject to the equally shared control of those they protect? Do they allow the different peoples of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   53 citations  
  7. The Phenomenal Stance.Philip Robbins & Anthony I. Jack - 2006 - Philosophical Studies 127 (1):59-85.
    Cognitive science is shamelessly materialistic. It maintains that human beings are nothing more than complex physical systems, ultimately and completely explicable in mechanistic terms. But this conception of humanity does not ?t well with common sense. To think of the creatures we spend much of our day loving, hating, admiring, resenting, comparing ourselves to, trying to understand, blaming, and thanking -- to think of them as mere mechanisms seems at best counterintuitive and unhelpful. More often it may strike us as (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  8. Group Agency and Supervenience.Philip Pettit - 2006 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (S1):85-105.
    Can groups be rational agents over and above their individual members? We argue that group agents are distinguished by their capacity to mimic the way in which individual agents act and that this capacity must “supervene” on the group members’ contributions. But what is the nature of this supervenience relation? Focusing on group judgments, we argue that, for a group to be rational, its judgment on a particular proposition cannot generally be a function of the members’ individual judgments on that (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   48 citations  
  9. Looks as Powers.Philip Pettit - 2003 - Philosophical Issues 13 (1):221-52.
    Although they may differ on the reason why, many philosophers hold that it is a priori that an object is red if and only if it is such as to look red to normal observers in normal conditions.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   57 citations  
  10.  8
    Ulrike May. Freud at Work: On the History of Psychoanalytic Theory and Practice, with an Analysis of Freud’s Patient Record Books. Translated by Daniela Haller, Bettina Mathes, Michael Molnar, Philip Slotkin, and Deirdre Winter. Xxvii + 366 Pp., Bibl., Index. New York: Taylor & Francis, 2018. £35.99 . ISBN 9781782205012. [REVIEW]Andreas Mayer - 2019 - Isis 110 (4):847-848.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Which Way to Educate?Philip R. May - 1975 - Moody Press.
  12. Which Way to School?Philip R. May - 1972 - London: Lion Publishing.
  13. The Absolute Arithmetic Continuum and the Unification of All Numbers Great and Small.Philip Ehrlich - 2012 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 18 (1):1-45.
    In his monograph On Numbers and Games, J. H. Conway introduced a real-closed field containing the reals and the ordinals as well as a great many less familiar numbers including $-\omega, \,\omega/2, \,1/\omega, \sqrt{\omega}$ and $\omega-\pi$ to name only a few. Indeed, this particular real-closed field, which Conway calls No, is so remarkably inclusive that, subject to the proviso that numbers—construed here as members of ordered fields—be individually definable in terms of sets of NBG, it may be said to contain (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  14. Perception of Partly Occluded Objects in Infancy* 1.Philip J. Kellman & Elizabeth S. Spelke - 1983 - Cognitive Psychology 15 (4):483–524.
    Four-month-old infants sometimes can perceive the unity of a partly hidden object. In each of a series of experiments, infants were habituated to one object whose top and bottom were visible but whose center was occluded by a nearer object. They were then tested with a fully visible continuous object and with two fully visible object pieces with a gap where the occluder had been. Pattems of dishabituation suggested that infants perceive the boundaries of a partly hidden object by analyzing (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  15.  5
    A Care Ethics Approach to Ethical Advocacy for Community Conditions.Philip G. Day, Kristian E. Sanchack & Robert P. Lennon - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (4):35-37.
    Volume 20, Issue 4, May 2020, Page 35-37.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16. Cognitive Extension, Enhancement, and the Phenomenology of Thinking.Philip J. Walsh - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (1):33-51.
    This paper brings together several strands of thought from both the analytic and phenomenological traditions in order to critically examine accounts of cognitive enhancement that rely on the idea of cognitive extension. First, I explain the idea of cognitive extension, the metaphysics of mind on which it depends, and how it has figured in recent discussions of cognitive enhancement. Then, I develop ideas from Husserl that emphasize the agential character of thought and the distinctive way that conscious thoughts are related (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  17. Practical Belief and Philosophical Theory.Philip Pettit - 1998 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 76 (1):15 – 33.
    Philosophy invariably starts with the attempt to spell out ideas and beliefs that we already hold, whether on topics like time or causality, colour or value, consciousness or free will, democracy or justice or freedom. It may go well beyond such pre-philosophical assumptions in its further developments, regimenting them in unexpected ways, revising them on novel lines, even discarding them entirely in favour of other views. But philosophy always begins with the articulation of ordinary ideas and beliefs. This is where (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  18.  20
    When Parsimony Backfires: Neglecting DNA Repair May Doom Neurons in Alzheimer's Disease.Thierry Nouspikel & Philip C. Hanawalt - 2003 - Bioessays 25 (2):168-173.
  19. Responsibility Incorporated.Philip Pettit - 2007 - Ethics 117 (2):171-201.
    The Herald of Free Enterprise, a ferry operating in the English Channel, sank on March 6, 1987, drowning nearly two hundred people. The official inquiry found that the company running the ferry was extremely sloppy, with poor routines of checking and management. “From top to bottom the body corporate was infected with the disease of sloppiness.”1 But the courts did not penalize anyone in what might seem to be an appropriate measure, failing to identify individuals in the company or on (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   148 citations  
  20.  19
    Collective Intentionality, Complex Pluralism and the Problem of Anarchy.Philip G. Cerny & Alex Prichard - 2017 - Journal of International Political Theory 13 (3).
    In this article, I argue that contemporary theories of collective intentionality force us to think about anarchy in new and challenging ways. In the years since Wendt declared the state a person, the collective intentionality of groups has become the focus of important scholarship across the humanities and social sciences. But this literature will not sit easily with mainstream International Relations for two reasons. First, contemporary theories of collective intentionality are difficult to square with the idea that the personified state (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  21. Testimonial Entitlement, Norms of Assertion and Privacy.Philip J. Nickel - 2013 - Episteme 10 (2):207-217.
    According to assurance views of testimonial justification, in virtue of the act of testifying a speaker provides an assurance of the truth of what she asserts to the addressee. This assurance provides a special justificatory force and a distinctive normative status to the addressee. It is thought to explain certain asymmetries between addressees and other unintended hearers (bystanders and eavesdroppers), such as the phenomenon that the addressee has a right to blame the speaker for conveying a falsehood but unintended hearers (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  22. Perceptual Learning and the Technology of Expertise.Philip J. Kellman, Christine Massey, Zipora Roth, Timothy Burke, Joel Zucker, Amanda Saw, Katherine E. Aguero & Joseph A. Wise - 2008 - Pragmatics and Cognition 16 (2):356-405.
    Learning in educational settings most often emphasizes declarative and procedural knowledge. Studies of expertise, however, point to other, equally important components of learning, especially improvements produced by experience in the extraction of information: Perceptual learning. Here we describe research that combines principles of perceptual learning with computer technology to address persistent difficulties in mathematics learning. We report three experiments in which we developed and tested perceptual learning modules to address issues of structure extraction and fluency in relation to algebra and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  23. Backgrounding Desire.Philip Pettit & Michael Smith - 1990 - Philosophical Review 99 (4):565-592.
    Granted that desire is always present in the genesis of human action, is it something on the presence of which the agent always reflects? I may act on a belief without coming to recognize that I have the belief. Can I act on a desire without recognizing that I have the desire? In particular, can the desire have a motivational presence in my decision making, figuring in the background, as it were, without appearing in the content of my deliberation, in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   96 citations  
  24. Mental Time Travel, Somatic Markers and "Myopia for the Future".Philip Gerrans - 2007 - Synthese 159 (3):459 - 474.
    Patients with damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) are often described as having impaired ability for planning and decision making despite retaining intact capacities for explicit reasoning. The somatic marker hypothesis is that the VMPFC associates implicitly represented affective information with explicit representations of actions or outcomes. Consequently, when the VMPFC is damaged explicit reasoning is no longer scaffolded by affective information, leading to characteristic deficits. These deficits are exemplified in performance on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) in which (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  25.  87
    Against a Minimum Voting Age.Philip Cook - 2013 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 16 (3):439-458.
    A minimum voting age is defended as the most effective and least disrespectful means of ensuring all members of an electorate are sufficiently competent to vote. Whilst it may be reasonable to require competency from voters, a minimum voting age should be rejected because its view of competence is unreasonably controversial, it is incapable of defining a clear threshold of sufficiency and an alternative test is available which treats children more respectfully. This alternative is a procedural test for minimum electoral (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  26. Responsibility Incorporated.Philip Pettit - 2007 - Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy 38 (2):90-117.
    Incorporated groups include businesses, universities, churches and the like. Organized to act as single centers of agency, they also routinely satisfy the three conditions that make an agent fit to be held responsible: they face significant choices, can recognize the relative value of different options, and are able to choose in sensitivity to such values. But is it redundant to hold a corporate agent responsible for something, when certain members are also held responsible for the individual parts they play? No (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   94 citations  
  27.  71
    Unpredictable Drug Shortages: An Ethical Framework for Short-Term Rationing in Hospitals.Philip M. Rosoff - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (1):1 - 9.
    Periodic and unexpected shortages of drugs, biologics, and even medical devices have become commonplace in the United States. When shortages occur, hospitals and clinics need to decide how to ration their available stock. When such situations arise, institutions can choose from several different allocation schemes, such as first-come, first-served, a lottery, or a more rational and calculated approach. While the first two approaches sound reasonable at first glance, there are a number of problems associated with them, including the inability to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  28. Aggregating Sets of Judgments: Two Impossibility Results Compared.Christian List & Philip Pettit - 2004 - Synthese 140 (1-2):207 - 235.
    The ``doctrinal paradox'' or ``discursive dilemma'' shows that propositionwise majority voting over the judgments held by multiple individuals on some interconnected propositions can lead to inconsistent collective judgments on these propositions. List and Pettit (2002) have proved that this paradox illustrates a more general impossibility theorem showing that there exists no aggregation procedure that generally produces consistent collective judgments and satisfies certain minimal conditions. Although the paradox and the theorem concern the aggregation of judgments rather than preferences, they invite comparison (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   85 citations  
  29.  11
    Mendeleev’s Predictions: Success and Failure.Philip Stewart - 2019 - Foundations of Chemistry 21 (1):3-9.
    Dmitri Mendeleev’s detailed prediction in 1871 of the properties of three as yet unknown elements earned him enormous prestige. Eleven other predictions, thrown off without elaboration, were less uniformly successful, thanks mainly his unbending adherence to the structure of his table and his failure to account for the lanthanides. At the end of his life he returned to his table without making the required changes, and added a theoretical discussion of elements lighter than hydrogen. The overall balance of success and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  30. The Technological Construction of Social Power.Philip Brey - 2008 - Social Epistemology 22 (1):71 – 95.
    This essay presents a theory of the role of technology in the distribution and exercise of social power. The paper studies how technical artefacts and systems are used to construct, maintain or strengthen power relations between agents, whether individuals or groups, and how their introduction and use in society differentially empowers and disempowers agents. The theory is developed in three steps. First, a definition of power is proposed, based on a careful discussion of opposing definitions of power, and it is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  31.  10
    On Agency, Emergence and Organization.Philip Clayton & Stuart Kauffman - 2006 - Biology and Philosophy 21 (4):501-521.
    Ultimately we will only understand biological agency when we have developed a theory of the organization of biological processes, and science is still a long way from attaining that goal. It may be possible nonetheless to develop a list of necessary conditions for the emergence of minimal biological agency. The authors offer a model of molecular autonomous agents which meets the five minimal physical conditions that are necessary for applying agential language in biology: autocatalytic reproduction; work cycles; boundaries for reproducing (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  32.  6
    Darwin.Philip Appleman - 1970 - New York: Norton.
    Overview * Part I: Introduction * Philip Appleman, Darwin: On Changing the Mind * Part II: Darwin’s Life * Ernst Mayr, Who Is Darwin? * Part III: Scientific Thought: Just before Darwin * Sir Gavin de Beer, Biology before the Beagle * Thomas Robert Malthus, An Essay on the Principle of Population * William Paley, Natural Theology * Jean Baptiste Pierre Antoine de Monet Lamarck, Zoological Philisophy * Charles Lyell, Principles of Geology * John Herschell, The Study of Natural (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  33. In Defense of Medial Theories of Sound.Philip John Meadows - 2018 - American Philosophical Quarterly 55 (3):293-302.
    In the recent literature on the nature of sound, there is an emerging consensus rejection of what might be thought of as the scientifically informed commonsense position: that sounds, whatever else they may be, must be entities that mediate between the source of the sound and the subject hearing it. This paper offers an argument for such "medial" theories of sound. This argument is intended to shift attention from the two considerations that have dominated the debate thus far: the relevant (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  34.  29
    Guilt by Dissociation: Why Mindreading May Not Be Prior to Metacognition After All.Philip Robbins - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):159-160.
    Carruthers argues that there is no developmental or clinical evidence that metacognition is dissociable from mindreading, and hence there is no reason to think that metacognition is prior to mindreading. A closer look at the evidence, however, reveals that these conclusions are premature at best.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Kant, Duty and Moral Worth.Philip Stratton-Lake - 2000 - Routledge.
    _Kant, Duty and Moral Worth _is a fascinating and original examination of Kant's account of moral worth. The complex debate at the heart of Kant's philosophy is over whether Kant said moral actions have worth only if they are carried out from duty, or whether actions carried out from mixed motives can be good. Philip Stratton-Lake offers a unique account of acting from duty, which utilizes the distinction between primary and secondary motives. He maintains that the moral law should (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  36.  41
    The Economy of Esteem:An Essay on Civil and Political Society: An Essay on Civil and Political Society.Geoffrey Brennan & Philip Pettit - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    This groundbreaking book revisits the writings of classic theorists in an effort re-evaluate the importance and influence the psychology of esteem has on the economy. The authors explore ways the economy of esteem may be reshaped to improve overall social outcomes and offer new ways of thinking about how society works and may be made to work.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  37.  58
    A Relational Ethical Dialogue With Research Ethics Committees.Philip J. Larkin, Bernadette Dierckx de Casterlé & Paul Schotsmans - 2008 - Nursing Ethics 15 (2):234-242.
    The aim of this article is to take relational ethics concepts and apply them to the context of application to research ethics committees for approval to carry out research. The process of a multinational qualitative research application is described. The article suggests that a relational ethics approach can address two issues: how qualitative proposals are interpreted by research ethics committees and how this safeguards potentially vulnerable respondents. In relational terms, the governance of a research project may be enhanced by shared (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  38.  59
    Fischer on Foreknowledge and Explanatory Dependence.Philip Swenson - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 9 (4):51-61.
    I explore several issues raised in John Martin Fischer’s Our Fate: Essays on God and Free Will. First I discuss whether an approach to the problem of freedom and foreknowledge that appeals directly to the claim that God’s beliefs depend on the future is importantly different from Ockhamism. I suggest that this dependence approach has advantages over Ockhamism. I also argue that this approach gives us good reason to reject the claim that the past is fixed. Finally, I discuss Fischer’s (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39.  44
    Fixed-Point Solutions to the Regress Problem in Normative Uncertainty.Philip Trammell - 2019 - Synthese 198 (2):1177-1199.
    When we are faced with a choice among acts, but are uncertain about the true state of the world, we may be uncertain about the acts’ “choiceworthiness”. Decision theories guide our choice by making normative claims about how we should respond to this uncertainty. If we are unsure which decision theory is correct, however, we may remain unsure of what we ought to do. Given this decision-theoretic uncertainty, meta-theories attempt to resolve the conflicts between our decision theories...but we may be (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40.  12
    When Religion and Medicine Clash: Non-Beneficial Treatments and Hope for a Miracle.Philip Rosoff - 2019 - HEC Forum 31 (2):119-139.
    Patient and family demands for the initiation or continuation of life-sustaining medically non-beneficial treatments continues to be a major issue. This is especially relevant in intensive care units, but is also a challenge in other settings, most notably with cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Differences of opinion between physicians and patients/families about what are appropriate interventions in specific clinical situations are often fraught with highly strained emotions, and perhaps none more so when the family bases their desires on religious belief. In this essay, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  41.  40
    The Silent Majority: Who Speaks at IRB Meetings.Philip J. Candilis, Charles W. Lidz, Paul S. Appelbaum, Robert M. Arnold, William P. Gardner, Suzanne Myers, Albert J. Grudzinskas Jr & Lorna J. Simon - 2012 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 34 (4):15-20.
    Institutional review boards are almost universally considered to be overworked and understaffed. They also require substantial commitments of time and resources from their members. Although some surveys report average IRB memberships of 15 people or more, federal regulations require only five. We present data on IRB meetings at eight of the top 25 academic medical centers in the United States funded by the National Institutes of Health. These data indicate substantial contributions from primary reviewers and chairs during protocol discussions but (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  42.  19
    Emerging ICT for Citizens’ Veillance: Theoretical and Practical Insights.Philip Boucher, Susana Nascimento & Mariachiara Tallacchini - 2018 - Science and Engineering Ethics 24 (3):821-830.
    In ubiquitous surveillance societies, individuals are subjected to observation and control by authorities, institutions, and corporations. Sometimes, citizens contribute their own knowledge and other resources to their own surveillance. In addition, some of “the watched” observe “the watchers” “through” sous‐veillant activities, and various forms of self-surveillance for different purposes. However, information and communication technologies are also increasingly used for social initiatives with a bottom up structure where citizens themselves define the goals, shape the outcomes and profit from the benefits of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  43.  61
    Delusional Misidentification as Subpersonal Disintegration.Philip Gerrans - 1999 - The Monist 82 (4):590-608.
    In this paper I consider a theory developed within cognitive neuropsychiatry to explain two delusions of misidentification, the Capgras and the Cotard delusions. These delusions are classified together with others in which the subject misidentifies persons, places or objects, including parts of her own body. Strictly speaking, the Cotard may not, at the level of content, be a delusion of misidentification, but I have described it as such because the theory I discuss treats it as sharing a causal and a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  44.  42
    In Defense of (Some) Altered Standards of Care for Ebola Infections in Developed Countries.Philip M. Rosoff - 2015 - HEC Forum 27 (1):1-9.
    The current outbreak of Ebola virus infection in West Africa continues to spread. Several patients have now been treated in the United States and preparations are being made for more. Because of the strict isolation required for their care, questions have been raised about what diagnostic and therapeutic interventions should be available. I discuss the ethical challenges associated with caring for patients in strict isolation and personnel wearing bulky protective gear with reduced dexterity and flexibility, the limitations this may place (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  45. Practical Unreason.Philip Pettit & Michael Smith - 1993 - Mind 102 (405):53-79.
    Some contemporary theories treat phenomena like weakness of will, compulsion and wantonness as practical failures but not as failures of rationality: say, as failures of autonomy or whatever. Other current theories-the majority see the phenomena as failures of rationality but not as distinctively practical failures. They depict them as always involving a theoretical deficiency: a sort of ignorance, error, inattention or illogic. They represent them as failures which are on a par with breakdowns of theoretical reason; the failures may not (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  46. Modularity and Mental Architecture.Philip Robbins - 2013 - WIREs Cognitive Science 4 (6):641-648.
    Debates about the modularity of cognitive architecture have been ongoing for at least the past three decades, since the publication of Fodor’s landmark book The Modularity of Mind (1983). According to Fodor, modularity is essentially tied to informational encapsulation, and as such is only found in the relatively low-level cognitive systems responsible for perception and language. According to Fodor’s critics in the evolutionary psychology camp, modularity simply reflects the fine-grained functional specialization dictated by natural selection, and it characterizes virtually all (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  47. Varieties of Altruism.Philip Kitcher - 2010 - Economics and Philosophy 26 (2):121-148.
    Discussions of altruism occur in three importantly different contexts. During the past four decades, evolutionary theory has been concerned with the possibility that forms of behaviour labelled as altruistic could emerge and could be maintained under natural selection. In these discussions, an agent A is said to act altruistically towards a beneficiary B when A's action promotes the expected reproductive success of B at expected reproductive cost to A. This sort of altruism, biological altruism, is quite different from the kind (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  48.  28
    A Century on From Dmitrii Mendeleev: Tables and Spirals, Noble Gases and Nobel Prizes. [REVIEW]Philip J. Stewart - 2007 - Foundations of Chemistry 9 (3):235-245.
    Mendeleev’s failure to represent the periodic system as a continuum may have hidden from him the space for the noble gases. A spiral format might have revealed the significance of the wide gaps in atomic mass between his rows. Tables overemphasize the division of the sequence into ‘periods’ and blocks. Not only do spirals express the continuity; in addition they are more attractive visually. They also facilitate a new placing for hydrogen and the introduction of an ‘element of atomic number (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  49.  19
    Three Aspects of Rational Explanation.Philip Pettit - 1996 - ProtoSociology 8:170-182.
    Rational explanation, as I understand it here, is the sort of explanation we practise when we try to make intentional sense of a person’s attitudes and actions. We may postulate various obstacles to rationality in the course of offering such explanations but the point of the exercise is generally to present the individual as a more or less rational subject: as a subject who, within the constraints of the obstacles postulated - and they can be quite severe - displays a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  50.  14
    When Human Behavior Enters the Equation.Philip Larsen - 2018 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 30 (3-4):316-324.
    ABSTRACTIn political science, there is a profound tension between those who argue that the prediction of human behavior is possible and those who disagree. On the one hand, experimental methods may be able to detect behavioral patterns. On the other hand, events, the evolution of institutions, and individual behavior itself may in many cases be too historically contingent to be reliably predicted. Methodological pluralism, and a greater degree of openness to mere historical understanding, would therefore seem to be called for.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000