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Peter Higgins
Eastern Michigan University
  1.  48
    The Rights and Duties of Immigrants in Liberal Societies.Peter W. Higgins - 2018 - Philosophy Compass 13 (11):e12527.
    What legal rights and duties immigrants should have is among the most ferociously debated topics in the politics of liberal societies today. However, as this article will show, there is remarkably little disagreement of great magnitude among political theorists and philosophers of immigration on the rights and duties of resident immigrants (even in contrast to the closely related philosophical discussion of justice in immigrant admissions). Specifically, this article will survey philosophical positions both on what legal rights immigrants (documented permanent residents, (...)
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  2.  6
    Migration Justice and Legitimacy.Peter W. Higgins - forthcoming - Res Publica:1-9.
    In order for a state to rightfully exercise self-determination by means of setting policies concerning migrants and migration, they must be legitimate, Gillian Brock argues in Justice for People on the Move. Legitimacy, in Brock’s view, requires that states satisfy three conditions: they must respect their own citizens’ human rights; they must be a part of a legitimate state system; and they must adequately contribute to the maintenance of this state system. In her new book, Brock also argues persuasively for (...)
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  3.  37
    Immigration Justice: A Principle for Selecting Just Admissions Policies.Peter W. Higgins - 2009 - Social Philosophy Today 25:149-162.
    This paper is addressed to those who hold that states’ immigration policies are subject to cosmopolitan principles of justice. I have a very limited goal in the paper, and that is to offer a condensed explication of a principle for determining whether states’ immigration policies are just. That principle is that just immigration policies may not avoidably harm disadvantaged social groups (whether domestic or foreign). This principle is inspired by the failure, among many extant cosmopolitan proposals for regulating immigration, to (...)
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  4.  18
    Immigration Justice: A Principle for Selecting Just Admissions Policies.Peter W. Higgins - 2009 - Social Philosophy Today 25:149-162.
    This paper is addressed to those who hold that states’ immigration policies are subject to cosmopolitan principles of justice. I have a very limited goal in the paper, and that is to offer a condensed explication of a principle for determining whether states’ immigration policies are just. That principle is that just immigration policies may not avoidably harm disadvantaged social groups. This principle is inspired by the failure, among many extant cosmopolitan proposals for regulating immigration, to attend to the morally (...)
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  5.  15
    Brock, Gillian, and Michael Blake. Debating Brain Drain: May Governments Restrict Emigration?New York: Oxford University Press, 2015. Pp. 304. $24.95 . $99.00. [REVIEW]Peter W. Higgins - 2016 - Ethics 126 (4):1095-1100.
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  6.  11
    The Ethics of Immigration, by Joseph H. Carens. [REVIEW]Peter W. Higgins - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (3):363-367.
  7.  2
    Unjust Borders: Individuals and the Ethics of Immigration, Javier S. Hidalgo , 214 Pp., $140 Cloth, $54.95 eBook.Peter W. Higgins - 2019 - Ethics and International Affairs 33 (4):511-513.
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