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Peter R. Anstey
University of Sydney
  1. Early Modern Experimental Philosophy.Peter R. Anstey & Alberto Vanzo - 2016 - In Justin Sytsma & Wesley Buckwalter (eds.), A Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Blackwell. pp. 87-102.
    In the mid-seventeenth century a movement of self-styled experimental philosophers emerged in Britain. Originating in the discipline of natural philosophy amongst Fellows of the fledgling Royal Society of London, it soon spread to medicine and by the eighteenth century had impacted moral and political philosophy and even aesthetics. Early modern experimental philosophers gave epistemic priority to observation and experiment over theorising and speculation. They decried the use of hypotheses and system-building without recourse to experiment and, in some quarters, developed a (...)
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  2.  68
    John Locke and Natural Philosophy.Peter R. Anstey - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Peter Anstey presents a thorough and innovative study of John Locke's views on the method and content of natural philosophy. Focusing on Locke's Essay concerning Human Understanding, but also drawing extensively from his other writings and manuscript remains, Anstey argues that Locke was an advocate of the Experimental Philosophy: the new approach to natural philosophy championed by Robert Boyle and the early Royal Society who were opposed to speculative philosophy. On the question of method, Anstey shows how Locke's pessimism about (...)
  3.  47
    The Philosophy of Robert Boyle.Peter R. Anstey - 2000 - Routledge.
    This book presents the first integrated treatment of the philosophy of Robert Boyle, one of the leading English natural philosophers of the Scientific Revolution.
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  4.  39
    Experimental versus Speculative Natural Philosophy.Peter R. Anstey - 2005 - In The Science of Nature in the Seventeenth Century: Patterns of Changes in Early Modern Natural Philosophy. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 215-242.
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  5.  15
    Armstrong's Materialist Theory of Mind.Peter R. Anstey & David Braddon-Mitchell (eds.) - 2022 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Armstrong's Materialist Theory of Mind is one of a handful of texts that began the physicalist revolution in the philosophy of mind. In this collection, distinguished philosophers examine what we still owe to it, how to expand it, as well as looking back on how it came about.
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  6.  81
    Robert Boyle and the heuristic value of mechanism.Peter R. Anstey - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (1):157-170.
    This paper argues that, contrary to the claims of Alan Chalmers, Boyle understood his experimental work to be intimately related to his mechanical philosophy. Its central claim is that the mechanical philosophy has a heuristic structure that motivates and gives direction to Boyle's experimental programme. Boyle was able to delimit the scope of possible explanations of any phenomenon by positing both that all qualities are ultimately reducible to a select group of mechanical qualities and that all explanations of natural phenomena (...)
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  7.  33
    John Locke and the Philosophy of Mind.Peter R. Anstey - 2015 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (2):221-244.
    This paper argues that, while Locke’s unstable usage of the term ‘mind’ prevents us from claiming that he had a theory of mind, it can still be said that he made a contribution to the philosophy of mind in its contemporary sense. After establishing that it was the term ‘soul’ that predominated in early modern British philosophy, the paper turns to Locke’s three central notions of the soul, the understanding, and the person. It is argued that there are two stages (...)
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  8.  48
    Locke, Bacon and Natural History.Peter R. Anstey - 2002 - Early Science and Medicine 7 (1):65-92.
    This paper argues that the construction of natural histories, as advocated by Francis Bacon, played a central role in John Locke's conception of method in natural philosophy. It presents new evidence in support of John Yolton's claim that "the emphasis upon compiling natural histories of bodies ... was the chief aspect of the Royal Society's programme that attracted Locke, and from which we need to understand his science of nature". Locke's exposure to the natural philosophy of Robert Boyle, the medical (...)
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  9. Bacon, experimental philosophy and French Enlightenment natural history.Peter R. Anstey - 2018 - In Raphaelle Garrod & Paul Smith (eds.), Natural History in Early Modern France: The Poetics of an Epistemic Genre. Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 205–240.
    This chapter examines Francis Bacon's influence on Buffon's and Diderot's conceptions of natural history.
     
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  10.  21
    Locke on measurement.Peter R. Anstey - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 60:70-81.
  11.  61
    Boyle on seminal principles.Peter R. Anstey - 2002 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 33 (4):597-630.
    This paper presents a comprehensive study of Robert Boyle’s writings on seminal principles or seeds. It examines the role of seeds in Boyle’s account of creation, the generation of plants and animals, spontaneous generation, the generation of minerals and disease. By an examination of all of Boyle’s major extant discussions of seeds it is argued that there were discernible changes in Boyle’s views over time. As the years progressed Boyle became more sceptical about the role of seminal principles in the (...)
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  12. Robert Boyle and the Intelligibility of the Corpuscular Philosophy.Peter R. Anstey - 2019 - In Peter R. Anstey & Alberto Vanzo (eds.), Experiment, Speculation and Religion in Early Modern Philosophy. New York: Routledge.
    Early modern experimental philosophers were opposed to speculation, and yet many endorsed speculative theories. This chapter gives a partial explanation of why this is so, using Robert Boyle’s acceptance and promotion of the corpuscular philosophy as a case study. It argues that, in addition to furnishing experimental evidence for the corpuscular hypothesis in his Forms and Qualities, Boyle attempted to establish its epistemic superiority over other speculative theories on the grounds that it is founded upon superior principles. In his ‘Excellency (...)
     
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  13.  10
    The Idea of Principles in Early Modern Thought: Interdisciplinary Perspectives.Peter R. Anstey (ed.) - 2017 - New York: Routledge.
    This collection presents the first sustained examination of the nature and status of the idea of principles in early modern thought. Principles are almost ubiquitous in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries: the term appears in famous book titles, such as Newton’s _Principia_; the notion plays a central role in the thought of many leading philosophers, such as Leibniz’s Principle of Sufficient Reason; and many of the great discoveries of the period, such as the Law of Gravitational Attraction, were described as (...)
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  14.  51
    Locke and botany.Peter R. Anstey & Stephen A. Harris - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (2):151-171.
    This paper argues that the English philosopher John Locke, who has normally been thought to have had only an amateurish interest in botany, was far more involved in the botanical science of his day than has previously been known. Through the presentation of new evidence deriving from Locke’s own herbarium, his manuscript notes, journal and correspondence, it is established that Locke made a modest contribution to early modern botany. It is shown that Locke had close and ongoing relations with the (...)
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  15.  44
    Experimental pedagogy and the eclipse of Robert Boyle in England.Peter R. Anstey - 2015 - Intellectual History Review 25 (1):115-131.
  16. Boyle Against Thinking Matter.Peter R. Anstey - 2001 - In Christopher Luthy, John E. Murdoch & William R. Newman (eds.), Late Medieval and Early Modern Corpuscular Matter Theories. Netherlands: pp. 483-514.
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  17. Locke and Natural Philosophy.Peter R. Anstey - 2016 - In Matthew Stuart (ed.), A Companion to Locke. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing. pp. 64-81.
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  18.  41
    Locke, the Quakers and enthusiasm.Peter Anstey - 2019 - Intellectual History Review 29 (2):199-217.
  19.  56
    Francis Bacon and the Laws of Ramus.Peter R. Anstey - 2015 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 5 (1):1-23.
    This article assesses the role of the laws of the French logician and educational reformer Petrus Ramus in the writings of Francis Bacon. The laws of Ramus derive from Aristotle’s grounds for necessary propositions. Necessary propositions, according to Aristotle, Ramus, and Bacon, are required for the premises of scientific syllogisms. It is argued that in Bacon’s Advancement of Learning and De augmentis scientiarum the only role for these laws is in the transmission of knowledge that has already been acquired. However, (...)
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  20. The experimental history of the understanding from Locke to Sterne.Peter R. Anstey - 2009 - Eighteenth-Century Thought 4:143-169.
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  21. Further reflections on Locke's medical remains.Peter R. Anstey - 2015 - Locke Studies 15:215-242.
     
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  22.  36
    Revisiting Matter, Form and Mechanism in the Seventeenth Century. [REVIEW]Peter R. Anstey - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (3):569-579.
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  23.  18
    Robert Boyle.Peter R. Anstey & J. J. Macintosh - 2014 - In Edward Zalta (ed.), The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Fall 2010 Edition). Stanford University: Metaphysics Research Lab, CSLI. pp. 1-39.
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  24.  13
    Essences and Kinds.Peter R. Anstey - 2011 - In Desmond M. Clarke & Catherine Wilson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy in Early Modern Europe. Oxford University Press.
    This article examines the views of René Descartes, Robert Boyle, and John Locke on essence and kinds and outlines the polemical stances that motivate and direct each of their views. It describes the ontological categories to which they subscribed and their own speculative theories about the actual kinds in the world. It categories to which they subscribed and their own speculative theories about the actual kinds in the world and discusses the late-Aristotelian theory of substantial forms.
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  25.  42
    The methodological origins of Newton’s queries.Peter R. Anstey - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (2):247-269.
    This paper analyses the different ways in which Isaac Newton employed queries in his writings on natural philosophy. It is argued that queries were used in three different ways by Newton and that each of these uses is best understood against the background of the role that queries played in the Baconian method that was adopted by the leading experimenters of the early Royal Society. After a discussion of the role of queries in Francis Bacon’s natural historical method, Newton’s queries (...)
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  26.  20
    D'Alembert, the “Preliminary Discourse” and experimental philosophy.Peter R. Anstey - 2014 - Intellectual History Review 24 (4):495-516.
  27.  16
    John Locke, Thomas Sydenham, and the authorship of two medical essays.Peter R. Anstey & John Burrows - 2009 - Electronic British Library Journal 3:1-42.
    Two medical essays in the hand of John Locke survive amongst the Shaftesbury Papers in the National Archives (National Archives PRO 30/24/47/2, ff. 31r–38v and ff. 49r–56r). Since the 1960s their authorship has been disputed. Some scholars have attributed them to the London physician Thomas Sydenham, others have attributed them to Locke. Detailed analyses of their contents and the context of their composition provide very strong evidence for Lockean authorship. This is reinforced by the application of the most recent techniques (...)
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  28. Locke on method in natural philosophy.Peter R. Anstey - 2003 - In The Philosophy of John Locke: New Perspectives. Routledge. pp. 26--42.
  29. The Philosophy of John Locke: New Perspectives.Peter R. Anstey (ed.) - 2003 - Routledge.
    This collection of new essays on John Locke's philosophy provides the most up-to-date entrée into the exciting developments taking place in the study of one of the most important contributors to modern thought. Covering Locke's natural philosophy, his political and moral thought and his philosophy of religion, this book brings together the pioneering work of some of the world's leading Locke scholars.
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  30. Experimental philosophy and the principles of natural religion.Peter R. Anstey - 2017 - In The Idea of Principles in Early Modern Thought: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. New York: Routledge. pp. 246-270.
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  31. Introduction.Peter R. Anstey - 2017 - In The Idea of Principles in Early Modern Thought: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. New York: Routledge. pp. 1-15.
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  32. John Locke (1632-1704).Peter R. Anstey - 2017 - Routledge Encyclopaedia of Philosophy.
     
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  33. The Creation of the English Hippocrates.Peter R. Anstey - 2011 - Medical History 55 (4):457-478.
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  34.  56
    John Locke’s seed lists: a case study in botanical exchange.Stephen A. Harris & Peter R. Anstey - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 40 (4):256-264.
    This paper gives a detailed analysis of four seed lists in the journals of John Locke. These lists provide a window into a fascinating open network of botanical exchange in the early 1680s which included two of the leading botanists of the day. Pierre Magnol of Montpellier and Jacob Bobart the Younger of Oxford. The provenance and significance of the lists are assessed in relation to the relevant extant herbaria and plant catalogues from the period. The lists and associated correspondence (...)
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  35.  24
    John Locke and Helmontian Medicine.Peter R. Anstey - 2010 - In Charles T. Wolfe & Ofer Gal (eds.), The Body as Object and Instrument of Knowledge. Embodied Empiricism in Early Modern Science. Springer. pp. 93--117.
  36.  41
    Robert Boyle and Locke's "Morbus" Entry: a Reply To J.C. Walmsley.Peter R. Anstey - 2002 - Early Science and Medicine 7 (4):358-377.
  37. The Christian Virtuoso and the Reformers: Are there Reformation Roots to Boyle’s Natural Philosophy?Peter R. Anstey - 2000 - Lucas: An Evangelical History Review 27:1-20.
    The question of the extent to which a natural philosopher like Robert Boyle was influenced by the reformers has a great deal of intrinsic interest. That Boyle was a Protestant and was well versed in the current theological issues of his day is beyond dispute. But the central question to be explored in this paper is the extent to which he was influenced either directly by the reformers themselves or indirectly by Calvinist theology. This in turn has implications for the (...)
     
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  38.  25
    John Locke on the understanding.Peter R. Anstey - 2013 - In The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 311.
    The chapter examines the views of John Locke on the study of human understanding, focusing on his work entitled An Essay concerning Human Understanding and Of the Conduct of the Understanding. It highlights Locke's use of the Stoic tripartite division of knowledge into natural philosophy, ethics, and logic, and his emphasis on the importance of the senses in the acquisition of sensitive knowledge of the natural world. The chapter also discusses the normative aims for the study of the understanding, and (...)
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  39.  64
    From scientia to science: Tom Sorell, G. A. J. Rogers and Jill Kraye : Scientia in early modern philosophy: Seventeenth-century thinkers on demonstrative knowledge from first principles. Dordrecht: Springer, 2010, xvi+139, £99.95HB. [REVIEW]Peter R. Anstey - 2010 - Metascience 20 (2):295-297.
    From scientia to science Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9483-3 Authors Peter R. Anstey, Department of Philosophy, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin, 9054 New Zealand Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  40. A very principled project.Peter R. Anstey - 2017 - Humanities Australia 8:80-85.
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  41. Early Modern Experimental Philosophy.Peter R. Anstey, J. Gomez & K. Walsh - 2010
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  42. Early Modern Philosophy of Religion: An Introduction.Peter R. Anstey - 2009 - In Graham Oppy & Nick Trakakis (eds.), Medieval Philosophy of Religion: The History of Western Philosophy of Religion, Volume 2. Durham: Acumen Publishing. pp. 1-18.
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  43.  7
    Experimental philosophy and the origins of empiricism.Peter R. Anstey - 2023 - New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
    The emergence of experimental philosophy was one of the most significant developments in the early modern period. However, it is often overlooked in modern scholarship, despite being associated with leading figures such as Francis Bacon, Robert Boyle, Isaac Newton, Jean Le Rond d'Alembert, David Hume and Christian Wolff. Ranging from the early Royal Society of London in the seventeenth century to the uptake of experimental philosophy in Paris and Berlin in the eighteenth, this book provides new terms of reference for (...)
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  44. Experimental Philosophy: Old and New.Peter R. Anstey - 2011 - Dunedin, New Zealand: De Beer Gallery Special Collections, University of Otago.
    This is an online book exhibition at the University of Otago Library. It contains images of Hume's copy of Berkeley's New Theory of Vision, 1709.
     
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  45. General Introduction and Introduction.Peter R. Anstey - 2006 - In John Locke: Critical Assessments of Leading Philosophers. Abingdon: Routledge. pp. 1-18.
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  46. Introduction.Peter R. Anstey - 2003 - In The Philosophy of John Locke: New Perspectives. London: Routledge.
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  47.  3
    John Locke: Critical Assessments of Leading Political Philosophers.Peter R. Anstey (ed.) - 2006 - Routledge.
    Today, John Locke is recognized as one of the most important and formative philosophical influences on the modern world. His imprint is still felt in political and legal thought, in educational theory, moral theory and in the theory of knowledge. Lockes key works, Two Treatises of Government , and the monumental An Essay Concerning Human Understanding , provoked lively debate when they were first published in 1690 and remain standard texts in undergraduate philosophy courses throughout the English-speaking world and beyond. (...)
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  48. Locke and Cartesian cosmology.Peter R. Anstey - 2018 - In Philippe Hamou & Martine Pécharman (eds.), Locke and Cartesian Philosophy. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. pp. 33–48.
    This chapter examines John Locke's interest in and views on the Cartesian vortex theory.
     
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  49. Locke and non-propositional knowledge.Peter R. Anstey - forthcoming - In Kiyoshi Shimokawa & Peter R. Anstey (eds.), Locke on Knowledge, Politics and Religion: New Interpretations from Japan. London:
    Peter Anstey rejects the widespread view that all knowledge for Locke is propositional. He argues, instead, that Locke accepts a form of non-propositional knowledge. The perception of the agreement and disagreement of ideas, according to Anstey's interpretation, is akin to what Bertrand Russell called “knowledge by acquaintance.” He presents a careful, four-step analysis of Locke’s view of the acquisition of knowledge, which is designed to show how the mind proceeds from perceiving to affirming, then to assenting, and finally to verbalizing (...)
     
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  50. Le ressort de l'air selon Boyle et Mariotte.Peter R. Anstey - 2009 - In Myriam Dennehy & Charles Ramond (eds.), Philosophie Naturelle de Robert Boyle,. Paris: Librairie Philosophique J. Vrin.. pp. 379-403.
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