Order:
Disambiguations
Peter Nelsen [4]Peter J. Nelsen [2]
See also
Peter Nelsen
Appalachian State University
  1.  20
    The Inquiry of Care.Peter Nelsen - 2013 - Educational Theory 63 (4):351-368.
    While discussions of the moral dimensions of the caring relation and their implications for teaching and learning are well developed within the literature, there has not been much analysis of the place of inquiry within our understanding of caring and the education inspired by it. Previous discussions offer important insight into what care-inspired education might entail, but they do not address how inquiry itself may be enhanced by an ethic of care. After arguing that we should consider reason to be (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  47
    Oppression, Autonomy and the Impossibility of the Inner Citadel.Peter Nelsen - 2010 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (4):333-349.
    This paper argues for a conception of autonomy that takes social oppression seriously without sapping autonomy of its valuable focus on individual self-direction. Building on recent work in relational accounts of autonomy, the paper argues that current conceptions of autonomy from liberal, feminist and critical theorists do not adequately account for the social features of belief formation. The paper then develops an alternative conception of relational autonomy that focuses on how autonomy contains both individualistic and social epistemic features. Rather than (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3.  15
    Growth and Resistance: How Deweyan Pragmatism Reconstructs Social Justice Education.Peter J. Nelsen - 2016 - Educational Theory 66 (1-2):231-244.
    While Democracy and Education is often cited within the scholarship on and teaching of social justice education, it and Dewey's work generally remain underutilized. Peter Nelsen argues in this essay that Deweyan pragmatism offers rich resources for social justice education by exploring how Dewey's three-part conception of growth has both analytical and normative force. Nelsen makes this case by examining student resistance to engagement with social justice issues, and concludes from this analysis that resistance is an opportunity for growth. Furthermore, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. Reconciliatory Empathy Amidst Wild Emotions.Peter Nelsen - 2017 - Philosophy of Education 73:623-634.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  43
    An Overburdened Term: Dewey's Concept of "Experience" as Curriculum Theory.Seaman Jayson & J. Nelsen Peter - 2011 - Education and Culture 27 (1):5-25.
    From the start, John Dewey's ideas about education have been prone to misunderstanding. One of the greatest casualties has been "experience," a term so routinely misappropriated that Dewey ultimately decided to abandon it. He wrote, "I would abandon the term 'experience' because of my growing realization that the historical obstacles which prevented understanding of my use of 'experience' are, for all practical purposes, insurmountable. I would substitute the term 'culture' because with its meanings as now firmly established it can fully (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  15
    Deweyan Tools for Inquiry and the Epistemological Context of Critical Pedagogy.Peter Nelsen & Jayson Seaman - 2011 - Educational Studies: A Jrnl of the American Educ. Studies Assoc 47 (6):561-582.
    This article develops the notion of resistance as articulated in the literature of critical pedagogy as being both culturally sponsored and cognitively manifested. To do so, the authors draw upon John Dewey's conception of tools for inquiry. Dewey provides a way to conceptualize student resistance not as a form of willful disputation, but instead as a function of socialization into cultural models of thought that actively truncate inquiry. In other words, resistance can be construed as the cognitive and emotive dimensions (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark