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  1.  22
    Modeling How, When, and What Is Learned in a Simple Fault‐Finding Task.Frank E. Ritter & Peter A. Bibby - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (5):862-892.
    We have developed a process model that learns in multiple ways while finding faults in a simple control panel device. The model predicts human participants' learning through its own learning. The model's performance was systematically compared to human learning data, including the time course and specific sequence of learned behaviors. These comparisons show that the model accounts very well for measures such as problem‐solving strategy, the relative difficulty of faults, and average fault‐finding time. More important, because the model learns and (...)
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  2.  19
    Instruction and Practice in Learning to use a Device.Peter A. Bibby & Stephen J. Payne - 1996 - Cognitive Science 20 (4):539-578.
    We explore the extent to which Anderson's (1987) theory of knowledge compilation can account for the relationship between instructions and practice in learning to use a simple device. Bibby and Payne (1993) reported experimental support for knowledge compilation in this domain. This article replicates the finding of a performance cross‐over between instruction type and task type that disappears with practice on the tasks. The research is extended by using verbal protocols to model the strategies of novice and more experienced individuals. (...)
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  3.  3
    Loss-Chasing, Alexithymia, and Impulsivity in a Gambling Task: Alexithymia as a Precursor to Loss-Chasing Behavior When Gambling.Peter A. Bibby - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  4.  43
    Volitional control in the learning of artificial grammars.Peter A. Bibby & Geoffrey Underwood - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):757-758.
    Dienes & Perner argue that volitional control in artificial grammar learning is best understood in terms of the distinction between implicit and explicit knowledge representations. We maintain that direct, explicit access to knowledge organised in a hierarchy of implicitness/explicitness is neither necessary nor sufficient to explain volitional control. People can invoke volitional control when their knowledge is implicit, as in the case of artificial grammar learning, and they can invoke volitional control when any part of their knowledge representation is implicit, (...)
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