18 found
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  1.  35
    Sensitivity to emotion information in children’s lexical processing.Tatiana C. Lund, David M. Sidhu & Penny M. Pexman - 2019 - Cognition 190 (C):61-71.
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  2.  12
    Meaning in hand: Investigating shared mechanisms of motor imagery and sensorimotor simulation in language processing.Emiko J. Muraki, Stephan F. Dahm & Penny M. Pexman - 2023 - Cognition 240 (C):105589.
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  3.  27
    The Benefits of Sensorimotor Knowledge: Body–Object Interaction Facilitates Semantic Processing.Paul D. Siakaluk, Penny M. Pexman, Christopher R. Sears, Kim Wilson, Keri Locheed & William J. Owen - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (3):591-605.
    This article examined the effects of body–object interaction (BOI) on semantic processing. BOI measures perceptions of the ease with which a human body can physically interact with a word's referent. In Experiment 1, BOI effects were examined in 2 semantic categorization tasks (SCT) in which participants decided if words are easily imageable. Responses were faster and more accurate for high BOI words (e.g., mask) than for low BOI words (e.g., ship). In Experiment 2, BOI effects were examined in a semantic (...)
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  4.  54
    Evidence for the activation of sensorimotor information during visual word recognition: The body–object interaction effect.Paul D. Siakaluk, Penny M. Pexman, Laura Aguilera, William J. Owen & Christopher R. Sears - 2008 - Cognition 106 (1):433-443.
  5.  45
    Effects of Emotional Experience for Abstract Words in the Stroop Task.Paul D. Siakaluk, Nathan Knol & Penny M. Pexman - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (8):1698-1717.
    In this study, we examined the effects of emotional experience, a relatively new dimension of emotional knowledge that gauges the ease with which words evoke emotional experience, on abstract word processing in the Stroop task. In order to test the context-dependency of these effects, we accentuated the saliency of this dimension in Experiment 1A by blocking the stimuli such that one block consisted of the stimuli with the highest emotional experience ratings and the other block consisted of the stimuli with (...)
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  6.  17
    Development of Embodied Word Meanings: Sensorimotor Effects in Children’s Lexical Processing.Michelle Inkster, Michele Wellsby, Ellen Lloyd & Penny M. Pexman - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  7.  4
    Children's processing of written irony: An eye-tracking study.Henri Olkoniemi, Sohvi Halonen, Penny M. Pexman & Tuomo Häikiö - 2023 - Cognition 238 (C):105508.
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  8.  23
    Get rich quick: The signal to respond procedure reveals the time course of semantic richness effects during visual word recognition.Ian S. Hargreaves & Penny M. Pexman - 2014 - Cognition 131 (2):216-242.
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  9.  41
    The Influence of Bodily Experience on Children's Language Processing.Michele Wellsby & Penny M. Pexman - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3):425-441.
    The Body–Object Interaction (BOI) variable measures how easily a human body can physically interact with a word's referent (Siakaluk, Pexman, Aguilera, Owen, & Sears, ). A facilitory BOI effect has been observed with adults in language tasks, with faster and more accurate responses for high BOI words (e.g., mask) than for low BOI words (e.g., ship; Wellsby, Siakaluk, Owen, & Pexman, ). We examined the development of this effect in children. Fifty children (aged 6–9 years) and a group of 21 (...)
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  10.  45
    Is More Always Better for Verbs? Semantic Richness Effects and Verb Meaning.David M. Sidhu, Alison Heard & Penny M. Pexman - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  11.  15
    Effects of Emotional Valence and Concreteness on Children’s Recognition Memory.Julia M. Kim, David M. Sidhu & Penny M. Pexman - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    There are considerable gaps in our knowledge of how children develop abstract language. In this paper, we tested the Affective Embodiment Account, which proposes that emotional information is more essential for abstract than concrete conceptual development. We tested the recognition memory of 7- and 8-year-old children, as well as a group of adults, for abstract and concrete words which differed categorically in valence. Word valence significantly interacted with concreteness in hit rates of both children and adults, such that effects of (...)
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  12.  9
    Mapping semantic space: Exploring the higher-order structure of word meaning.Veronica Diveica, Emiko J. Muraki, Richard J. Binney & Penny M. Pexman - 2024 - Cognition 248 (C):105794.
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  13.  5
    The role of emotion in acquisition of verb meaning.Emiko J. Muraki & Penny M. Pexman - forthcoming - Cognition and Emotion.
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  14.  11
    “That Was Smooth, Mom”: Children's Production of Verbal and Gestural Irony.Penny M. Pexman, Lenka Zdrazilova, Devon McConnachie, Kirby Deater-Deckard & Stephen A. Petrill - 2009 - Metaphor and Symbol 24 (4):237-248.
    Research suggests that typically developing children begin to understand verbal irony around 5 or 6 years of age. Children's production of verbal irony, however, has not previously been examined. This study was a preliminary investigation of children's irony production, including both verbal and gestural (nonverbal) forms. We coded instances of irony in interactions within 118 family triads, each consisting of 1 parent and 2 children, aged 3 to 15 years. Triads performed an 8-min cooperative task with dominos. In this context, (...)
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  15.  10
    Children's Use of Trait Information in Understanding Verbal Irony.Penny M. Pexman, Melanie Glenwright, Suzanne Hala, Stacey L. Kowbel & Sara Jungen - 2006 - Metaphor and Symbol 21 (1):39-60.
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  16.  12
    Grasping the Alternative: Reaching and Eyegaze Reveal Children’s Processing of Negation.Alison W. Doyle, Kelsey Friesen, Sarah Reimer & Penny M. Pexman - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  17.  17
    Preschool-aged children recognize ambivalence: emerging identification of concurrent conflicting desires.Kristin Rostad & Penny M. Pexman - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  18.  24
    A Prime Example of the Maluma/Takete Effect? Testing for Sound Symbolic Priming.David M. Sidhu & Penny M. Pexman - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (7):1958-1987.
    Certain nonwords, like maluma and takete, are associated with roundness and sharpness, respectively. However, this has typically been demonstrated using explicit tasks. We investigated whether this association would be detectable using a more implicit measure—a sequential priming task. We began with a replication of the standard Maluma/Takete effect before examining whether round and sharp nonword primes facilitated the categorization of congruent shapes. We found modest evidence of a priming effect in response accuracy. We next examined whether nonword primes affected categorization (...)
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