Results for 'Paul M. Hocking'

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  1. The Blind Hens' Challenge: Does It Undermine the View That Only Welfare Matters in Our Dealings with Animals?Peter Sandøe, Paul M. Hocking, Bjorn Förkman, Kirsty Haldane, Helle H. Kristensen & Clare Palmer - 2014 - Environmental Values 23 (6):727-742.
    Animal ethicists have recently debated the ethical questions raised by disenhancing animals to improve their welfare. Here, we focus on the particular case of breeding hens for commercial egg-laying systems to become blind, in order to benefit their welfare. Many people find breeding blind hens intuitively repellent, yet ‘welfare-only’ positions appear to be committed to endorsing this possibility if it produces welfare gains. We call this the ‘Blind Hens’ Challenge’. In this paper, we argue that there are both empirical and (...)
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  2. Eliminative Materialism and the Propositional Attitudes.Paul M. Churchland - 1981 - Journal of Philosophy 78 (2):67-90.
    Eliminative materialism is the thesis that our common-sense conception of psychological phenomena constitutes a radically false theory, a theory so fundamentally defective that both the principles and the ontology of that theory will eventually be displaced, rather than smoothly reduced, by completed neuroscience. Our mutual understanding and even our introspection may then be reconstituted within the conceptual framework of completed neuroscience, a theory we may expect to be more powerful by far than the common-sense psychology it displaces, and more substantially (...)
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  3.  74
    Events and semantic architecture.Paul M. Pietroski - 2005 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    A study of how syntax relates to meaning by a leader of the new generation of philosopher-linguists.
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  4. Functionalism at Forty: A Critical Retrospective.Paul M. Churchland - 2005 - Journal of Philosophy 102 (1):33 - 50.
  5.  7
    Purity in the Christian home.Paul M. Landis - 1978 - Crockett, Ky.: Rod and Staff Publishers.
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  6.  3
    Event Variables and Their Values.Paul M. Pietroski - 2013 - In Ernie Lepore & Kurt Ludwig (eds.), Blackwell Companion to Donald Davidson. Blackwell. pp. 91–125.
    We can use language to say what people did, often describing the same action in different complex ways. Davidson offered an illuminating analysis of action reports like “Miss Scarlet stabbed Colonel Mustard with a dagger in the library,” which involve adverbial modifiers. Part of the challenge here is to say how such modifiers are semantically related to the rest of the sentence. Building on the ancient observation that verbs are often used to describe what happened, Davidson argued that an action (...)
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  7. Semantic typology and composition.Paul M. Pietroski - 2018 - In Derek Ball & Brian Rabern (eds.), The Science of Meaning: Essays on the Metatheory of Natural Language Semantics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  8.  6
    Moral formation and the virtuous life.Paul M. Blowers (ed.) - 2019 - Minneapolis: Fortress Press.
    In Moral Formation and the Virtuous Life, volume editor Paul M. Blowers has translated and gathered several key texts from early Christian sources to explore the broad themes of moral conscience and ethics. Readers will gain a sense of how moral formation was part of a process sustained by pastoral instruction and admonition based on ritual practice (baptism, eucharist, and liturgy) as well as learned ethical behaviors related to moral issues, such as sexual ethics, marriage and celibacy, wealth and (...)
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  9. Logical, phenomenological, and metalogical negation : Sartre with Frege (and Badiou).Paul M. Livingston - 2023 - In Talia Morag (ed.), Sartre and Analytic Philosophy. New York, NY: Routledge.
  10.  1
    Chapter 12 Lacan, Deleuze and the Consequences of Formalism.Paul M. Livingston - 2016 - In Boštjan Nedoh & Andreja Zevnik (eds.), Lacan and Deleuze: A Disjunctive Synthesis. Edinburgh: Eup. pp. 203-220.
  11. Lacan, Deleuze and the consequences of formalism.Paul M. Livingston - 2016 - In Boštjan Nedoh & Andreja Zevnik (eds.), Lacan and Deleuze: A Disjunctive Synthesis. Edinburgh: Eup.
  12. Matter and Consciousness: A Contemporary Introduction to the Philosophy of Mind.Paul M. Churchland (ed.) - 1984 - Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press.
    The Mind-Body Problem Questions: What is the mind? What is its connection to the body? Most basic division of answers: Dualist and Materialist (or Physicalist) responses.
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  13. Scientific Realism and the Plasticity of Mind.Paul M. Churchland - 1979 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
  14.  22
    Scientific Realism and the Plasticity of Mind.Paul M. Churchland (ed.) - 1979 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    A study in the philosophy of science, proposing a strong form of the doctrine of scientific realism' and developing its implications for issues in the philosophy of mind.
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  15. A Neurocomputational Perspective: The Nature of Mind and the Structure of Science.Paul M. Churchland - 1989 - MIT Press.
    A Neurocomputationial Perspective illustrates the fertility of the concepts and data drawn from the study of the brain and of artificial networks that model the...
  16. Matter and Consciousness.Paul M. Churchland - 1985 - Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press.
    In _Matter and Consciousness_, Paul Churchland presents a concise and contemporary overview of the philosophical issues surrounding the mind and explains the main theories and philosophical positions that have been proposed to solve them. Making the case for the relevance of theoretical and experimental results in neuroscience, cognitive science, and artificial intelligence for the philosophy of mind, Churchland reviews current developments in the cognitive sciences and offers a clear and accessible account of the connections to philosophy of mind. For (...)
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  17.  21
    Conjoining Meanings: Semantics Without Truth Values.Paul M. Pietroski - 2018 - Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
    Paul M. Pietroski presents an ambitious new account of human languages as generative procedures that respect substantive constraints. He argues that meanings are neither concepts nor extensions, and sentences do not have truth conditions; meanings are composable instructions for how to access and assemble concepts of a special sort.
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  18. Reduction, qualia and the direct introspection of brain states.Paul M. Churchland - 1985 - Journal of Philosophy 82 (January):8-28.
  19. The information capacity of the human motor system in controlling the amplitude of movement.Paul M. Fitts - 1954 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 47 (6):381.
  20. The Engine of Reason, the Seat of the Soul: A Philosophical Journey Into the Brain.Paul M. Churchland - 1995 - MIT Press.
    For the uninitiated, there are two major tendencies in the modeling of human cognition. The older, tradtional school believes, in essence, that full human cognition can be modeled by dividing the world up into distinct entities -- called __symbol s__-- such as “dog”, “cat”, “run”, “bite”, “happy”, “tumbleweed”, and so on, and then manipulating this vast set of symbols by a very complex and very subtle set of rules. The opposing school claims that this system, while it might be good (...)
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  21.  21
    A Critical Analysis of Australian Clinical Ethics Committees and the Functions They Serve.Paul M. McNeill - 2001 - Bioethics 15 (5-6):443-460.
    The predominant function of Australian clinical ethics committees (CECs) is policy formation. Some committees have an educational role. Few committees play any direct role in advising on ethics in the management of individual patients and this occurs only in exceptional circumstances. There is a tendency to exaggerate both the number and function of committees. It is suggested that studies of ethics committees, based on questionnaire surveys, should be interpreted cautiously. An examination of ethical issues indicates that there is a role (...)
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  22.  28
    Public Health Ethics: Asylum Seekers and the Case for Political Action.Paul M. Mcneill - 2003 - Bioethics 17 (5-6):487-503.
    ABSTRACT This paper is a case study in public health ethics. It considers whether there is a basis in ethics for political action by health professionals and their associations in response to inhumane treatment. The issue arises from Australia's treatment of asylum seekers and the charge that this treatment has been both immoral and inhumane. This judgement raises several questions of broader significance in bioethics and of significance to the emerging field of public health ethics. These questions relate to the (...)
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  23.  16
    The Coming World CivilizationWorld Religions and World CommunityChristianity and the Encounter of the World Religions.Paul J. Braisted, William Ernest Hocking, Robert Lawson Slater & Paul Tillich - 1965 - Philosophy East and West 15 (1):76.
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  24. Perceptual plasticity and theoretical neutrality: A reply to Jerry Fodor.Paul M. Churchland - 1988 - Philosophy of Science 55 (June):167-87.
    The doctrine that the character of our perceptual knowledge is plastic, and can vary substantially with the theories embraced by the perceiver, has been criticized in a recent paper by Fodor. His arguments are based on certain experimental facts and theoretical approaches in cognitive psychology. My aim in this paper is threefold: to show that Fodor's views on the impenetrability of perceptual processing do not secure a theory-neutral foundation for knowledge; to show that his views on impenetrability are almost certainly (...)
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  25.  41
    Plato's Camera: How the Physical Brain Captures a Landscape of Abstract Universals.Paul M. Churchland - 2012 - MIT Press.
    In _ Plato's Camera_, eminent philosopher Paul Churchland offers a novel account of how the brain constructs a representation -- or "takes a picture" -- of the universe's timeless categorical and dynamical structure. This construction process, which begins at birth, yields the enduring background conceptual framework with which we will interpret our sensory experience for the rest of our lives. But, as even Plato knew, to make singular perceptual judgments requires that we possess an antecedent framework of abstract categories (...)
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  26. Functionalism, Qualia, and Intentionality.Paul M. Churchland & Patricia Smith Churchland - 1981 - Philosophical Topics 12 (1):121-145.
  27.  19
    Images of Science: Essays on Realism and Empiricism.Paul M. Churchland & Clifford A. Hooker (eds.) - 1985 - University of Chicago Press.
    "Churchland and Hooker have collected ten papers by prominent philosophers of science which challenge van Fraassen's thesis from a variety of realist perspectives. Together with van Fraassen's extensive reply... these articles provide a comprehensive picture of the current debate in philosophy of science between realists and anti-realists."—Jeffrey Bub and David MacCallum, Foundations of Physics Letters.
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  28. Physical Composition by Bonding.Julian Husmann & Paul M. Näger - 2018 - In Ludger Jansen & Paul M. Näger (eds.), Peter van Inwagen: Materialism, Free Will and God. Cham: Springer. pp. 65-96.
    Van Inwagen proposes that besides simples only living organisms exist as composite objects. This paper suggests expanding van Inwagen’s ontology by also accepting composite objects in the case that physical bonding occurs (plus some extra conditions). Such objects are not living organ-isms but rather physical bodies. They include (approximately) the complete realm of inanimate ordinary objects, like rocks and tables, as well as inanimate scientific objects, like atoms and mol-ecules, the latter filling the ontological gap between simples and organisms in (...)
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  29.  31
    Information capacity of discrete motor responses.Paul M. Fitts & James R. Peterson - 1964 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 67 (2):103.
  30. Folk psychology and the explanation of human behavior.Paul M. Churchland - 1988 - Philosophical Perspectives 3:225-241.
  31.  4
    Studies in Sanskrit Syntax: A Volume in Honor of the Centennial of Speijer's Sanskrit Syntax.Peter M. Scharf & Hans Henrich Hock - 1994 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 114 (3):485.
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  32. Pornography: Marxism, Feminism, and the Future of Sexuality.Paul M. Hughes - 1988 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 23 (2):106-107.
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  33. Scientific Realism and the Plasticity of Mind.Paul M. Churchland - 1981 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 43 (2):397-397.
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  34. Stalking the wild epistemic engine.Paul M. Churchland & Patricia S. Churchland - 1983 - Noûs 17 (1):5-18.
  35.  31
    Plato's Camera: How the Physical Brain Captures a Landscape of Abstract Universals.Paul M. Churchland - 2013 - MIT Press.
    In _ Plato's Camera_, eminent philosopher Paul Churchland offers a novel account of how the brain constructs a representation -- or "takes a picture" -- of the universe's timeless categorical and dynamical structure. This construction process, which begins at birth, yields the enduring background conceptual framework with which we will interpret our sensory experience for the rest of our lives. But, as even Plato knew, to make singular perceptual judgments requires that we possess an antecedent framework of abstract categories (...)
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  36. Scientific Realism and the Plasticity of Mind.Paul M. Churchland - 1980 - Philosophy 55 (212):273-275.
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  37. The causal problem of entanglement.Paul M. Näger - 2016 - Synthese 193 (4):1127-1155.
    This paper expounds that besides the well-known spatio-temporal problem there is a causal problem of entanglement: even when one neglects spatio-temporal constraints, the peculiar statistics of EPR/B experiment is inconsistent with usual principles of causal explanation as stated by the theory of causal Bayes nets. The conflict amounts to a dilemma that either there are uncaused correlations or there are caused independences . I argue that the central ideas of causal explanations can be saved if one accepts the latter horn (...)
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  38. Some reductive strategies in cognitive neurobiology.Paul M. Churchland - 1986 - Mind 95 (July):279-309.
  39. Could a machine think?Paul M. Churchland & Patricia S. Churchland - 1990 - Scientific American 262 (1):32-37.
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    Heart rate variability biofeedback: how and why does it work?Paul M. Lehrer & Richard Gevirtz - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  41.  3
    Beyond the control of God?: six views on the problem of God and abstract objects.Paul M. Gould (ed.) - 2014 - New York: Bloomsbury Publishing.
  42.  77
    S-R compatibility: spatial characteristics of stimulus and response codes.Paul M. Fitts & Charles M. Seeger - 1953 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 46 (3):199.
  43. The logical character of action-explanations.Paul M. Churchland - 1970 - Philosophical Review 79 (2):214-236.
  44. Neurophilosophy at Work.Paul M. Churchland - 2007 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Churchland explores the unfolding impact of the several empirical sciences of the mind, especially cognitive neurobiology and computational neuroscience on a variety of traditional issues central to the discipline of philosophy. Representing Churchland's most recent research, they continue his research program, launched over thirty years ago which has evolved into the field of neurophilosophy. Topics such as the nature of Consciousness, the nature of cognition and intelligence, the nature of moral knowledge and moral reasoning, neurosemantics or world-representation in the brain, (...)
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  45.  24
    The Engine of Reason, the Seat of Soul: A Philosophical Journey into the Brain.Paul M. Churchland - 1998 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 58 (4):885-892.
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  46. Philosophical History and the Problem of Consciousness.Paul M. Livingston - 2004 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    The problem of explaining consciousness remains a problem about the meaning of language: the ordinary language of consciousness in which we define and express our sensations, thoughts, dreams and memories. This book argues that the problem arises from a quest that has taken shape over the twentieth century, and that the analysis of history provides new resources for understanding and resolving it. Paul Livingston traces the development of the characteristic practices of analytic philosophy to problems about the relationship of (...)
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  47.  83
    On the Contrary: Critical Essays, 1987-1997.Paul M. Churchland & Patricia Smith Churchland (eds.) - 1998 - Cambridge: MIT Press.
    This collection was prepared in the belief that the most useful and revealing of anyone's writings are often those shorter essays penned in conflict with...
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  48. On Raising: One Rule of English Grammar and Its Theoretical Implications.Paul M. Postal - 1976 - Foundations of Language 14 (2):257-285.
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  49. Prima facie obligations, ceteris paribus laws in moral theory.Paul M. Pietroski - 1993 - Ethics 103 (3):489-515.
  50.  12
    Research ethics review and the bureaucracy.Paul M. McNeill - 2002 - Monash Bioethics Review 21 (3):S72-S73.
    This paper suggests that the increasing bureaucracy of ethics review by committee is more about fulfilling institutional requirements than it is about ethics. It is suggested that ethics committees should not be instruments of bureaucratic regulation and control. They should be freed to play a critical role within the institution, to support and develop ethical research and researchers, and given time to discuss and explore difficult ethical issues where they arise. To burden research ethics committees with trivial bureaucratic tasks is (...)
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