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  1.  16
    Laughter as dissensus: Kant and the limits of normative theorizing around laughter.Patrick T. Giamario - 2021 - Contemporary Political Theory 20 (4):795-814.
    Political theorists have traditionally grappled with laughter by posing a simple, normative question: ‘What role, if any, should laughter play in the polis?’ However, the outsized presence of laughter in contemporary politics has rendered this question increasingly obsolete. What good does determining laughter’s role in the polis do when the polis itself is to a large extent shaped by laughter? The present essay argues that Kant’s aesthetic investigations of laughter in the Critique of Judgment and Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point (...)
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  2.  11
    “Making Reason Think More”: Laughter in Kant’s Aesthetic Philosophy.Patrick T. Giamario - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (4):161-176.
    This article explores the surprisingly decisive role that Kant’s “incongruity theory” of laughter plays in his aesthetic and broader critical philosophy. First, laughter constitutes a highly specific form of aesthetic judgment in Kant. Laughter involves a discordant relation between the cognitive faculties characteristic of the sublime, but this relation obtains between the understanding and the imagination, the two faculties at play in judgments of taste on the beautiful. Second, laughter is the transcendental condition of possibility for both the beautiful and (...)
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  3.  3
    It’s Funny Because It’s True? Reflections on Laughter, Deception, and Critique.Patrick T. Giamario - forthcoming - Sage Journals.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print. This essay challenges the prevailing view among critical theorists that laughter’s emancipatory power stems from its ability to speak the truth. The disparate accounts of laughter offered by Plato, Hobbes, and Nietzsche exemplify an alternative strategy for theorizing laughter as a performance of deception, or an experience that mystifies rather than enlightens. While a view of laughter as deceptive may at first appear to reduce laughter’s critical leverage over ideology, I argue that this (...)
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    It’s Funny Because It’s True? Reflections on Laughter, Deception, and Critique.Patrick T. Giamario - forthcoming - Philosophy and Social Criticism.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print. This essay challenges the prevailing view among critical theorists that laughter’s emancipatory power stems from its ability to speak the truth. The disparate accounts of laughter offered by Plato, Hobbes, and Nietzsche exemplify an alternative strategy for theorizing laughter as a performance of deception, or an experience that mystifies rather than enlightens. While a view of laughter as deceptive may at first appear to reduce laughter’s critical leverage over ideology, I argue that this (...)
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  5. It’s Funny Because It’s True? Reflections on Laughter, Deception, and Critique.Patrick T. Giamario - forthcoming - Sage Publications Ltd: Philosophy and Social Criticism.
    Philosophy & Social Criticism, Ahead of Print. This essay challenges the prevailing view among critical theorists that laughter’s emancipatory power stems from its ability to speak the truth. The disparate accounts of laughter offered by Plato, Hobbes, and Nietzsche exemplify an alternative strategy for theorizing laughter as a performance of deception, or an experience that mystifies rather than enlightens. While a view of laughter as deceptive may at first appear to reduce laughter’s critical leverage over ideology, I argue that this (...)
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    It’s Funny Because It’s True? Reflections on Laughter, Deception, and Critique.Patrick T. Giamario - forthcoming - Philosophy and Social Criticism:019145372110330.
    This essay challenges the prevailing view among critical theorists that laughter’s emancipatory power stems from its ability to speak the truth. The disparate accounts of laughter offered by Plato, Hobbes, and Nietzsche exemplify an alternative strategy for theorizing laughter as a performance of deception, or an experience that mystifies rather than enlightens. While a view of laughter as deceptive may at first appear to reduce laughter’s critical leverage over ideology, I argue that this approach offers a stronger account of its (...)
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  7.  13
    Adorno and Democracy: The American Years.Patrick T. Giamario - 2017 - Contemporary Political Theory 16 (4):574-577.
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