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  1.  30
    Encountering Depression In-Depth : An Existential-Phenomenological Approach to Selfhood, Depression, and Psychiatric Practice.Patrick Seniuk - 2020 - Dissertation, Södertörn University
    This dissertation in Theory of Practical Knowledge contends that depression is a disorder of the self. Using the existential-phenomenology of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, I argue that if we want to disclose the basic structure of depressed experience, then we must likewise disclose how selfexperience is inseparable from depressed experience. However, even though depression is a contemporary psychiatric category of illness, it is nevertheless a historically and heterogenous concept. To make sense of depression in the context of contemporary psychiatric practice, I show (...)
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  2.  24
    Experiences of Depression: A Study in Phenomenology. [REVIEW]Patrick Seniuk - 2016 - Philosophical Psychology 29 (5):792-794.
  3.  3
    I’M Shocked: Informed Consent in ECT and the Phenomenological-Self.Patrick Seniuk - 2018 - Life Sciences, Society and Policy 14 (1):1-19.
    This paper argues that phenomenological insights regarding selfhood are relevant to the informed consent process in the treatment of depression using electro-convulsive therapy. One of the most significant side-effects associated with ECT is retrograde amnesia. Unfortunately, the current informed consent model does not adequately appreciate the full extent in which memory loss disturbs lived-experience. Through the philosophy of Merleau-Ponty, it is possible to appreciate the way in which memory loss affects a person’s self-experience, with emphasis given to one’s pre-reflective and (...)
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    Merleau-Ponty and a Phenomenology of PTSD: Hidden Ghosts of Traumatic Memory by MaryCatherine McDonald.Patrick Seniuk - 2021 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 14 (2):187-191.
    An unintended consequence of the coronavirus pandemic has been renewed interest in trauma research. In Merleau-Ponty and a Phenomenology of PTSD: Hidden Ghosts of Traumatic Memory, MaryCatherine McDonald argues that the prevailing trauma research model is “episodic,” meaning that trauma research spikes in the aftermath of significant events. The problem with this model, McDonald contends, is that once the particular event or circumstance loses its everyday salience, also lost is interest in trauma research. Arguably, then, our understanding of trauma is (...)
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