13 found
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  1.  28
    Can Principlism Save Medical Ethics?Patrick Guinan - 2002 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 2 (2):229-234.
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  2.  12
    Human Dignity and Reproductive Technology.Patrick Guinan, Francis Cardinal George, Jean Bethke Elshtain, John M. Haas, Steven Bozza, Daniel P. Toma, Patrick Lee, William E. May, Richard M. Doerflinger & Gerard V. Bradley (eds.) - 2003 - Upa.
    The March 2002 symposium Human Dignity and Reproductive Technology brought together philosophers, theologians, scientists, lawyers, and scholars from across the United States. The essays of this book are the contributions of the symposium's participants.
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  3.  9
    Autonomy Has Not Killed Hippocrates.Patrick Guinan - 2009 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 9 (4):681-688.
    The Hippocratic tradition in medicine was declared to be over a generation ago. Classical medicine with the time-honored doctor–patient relationship was deemed paternalistic. Autonomy, in large part because of the Belmont Report of 1979, was ascendant. A new academic discipline, bioethics, was to replacemedical ethics. The patient would be free of paternalism, and health care would not look back. But it has not worked out that way. It seems that where life-threatening disease is concerned, a patient cannot be truly autonomous. (...)
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  4.  16
    Christianity and the Origin of the Hospital.Patrick Guinan - 2004 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 4 (2):257-263.
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  5.  77
    Hippocratic and Judeo-Christian Medical Ethics Defended.Patrick Guinan - 2008 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 8 (2):245-254.
    The Hippocratic oath and ethic have guided medicine for twenty-five hundred years. In the past thirty years there has been an effort to discredit the Hippocratic tradition. The mantra has been “the Hippocratic ethic is dead.” An article by Robert Veatch and Carol Mason, “Hippocratic vs. Judeo-Christian Medical Ethics,” epitomizes the anti-Hippocratic crusade. Veatch and Mason make three points: (1) there is no continuity between the oath and Judeo-Christian ethics; (2) the oath is flawed; and, more important, (3) the Hippocratic (...)
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  6.  20
    Hanson, Mark J., ed. Claiming Power over Life: Religion and Biotechnology Policy.Patrick Guinan - 2003 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 3 (2):422-423.
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  7.  27
    Is Assisted Nutrition and Hydration Always Mandated?Patrick Guinan - 2010 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 10 (3):481-488.
    There is controversy in the Catholic medical ethics community surrounding assisted nutrition and hydration (ANH). Recently, the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services were amended to make ANH “obligatory.” The persistent vegetative state is cited specifically in the document, and the sentence following its mention states that ANH is “optional” when it cannot be expected to “prolong life” or when it would be “excessively burdensome.” For patients suffering from other medical conditions, such as dementia and frailty, ANH (...)
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  8.  36
    Medical Ethics versus Bioethics (a.k.a. Principlism).Patrick Guinan - 2006 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 6 (4):651-659.
    The Hippocratic ethic, or medical ethics, has guided medical practitioners for 2,500 years. More recently it has been displaced by bioethics. Traditional medicalethics is a covenant between a competent physician and a sick patient, the purpose of which is to effect healing. Bioethics is a civil consensual ethic regulating health-care delivery. It is not personal by nature.Medical ethics is a deontological, virtue-based ethic. Bioethics, particularly as expressed in principlism, its most prominent school in the United States, isa liberal utilitarian ethic (...)
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  9.  11
    Manual of Hippocratic and Judeo-Christian medical ethics.Patrick Guinan - 2007 - Bloomington, IN: AuthorHouse. Edited by John Brehany.
    From the creator of the most intriguing Heroes and adored villain ever spawned - DANCE of the RISING SUN Known by his People as Michael Len Red Mountain, he has returned to Cati Phoenix to claim what is rightfully his. The obstacles arisen to stand in his way are welded in powerful influences. But his leverages prove more potent than all the great cerebrates of greed and cleverness combined, for his are born of his culture... In this sequel to the (...)
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  10.  21
    Shuman, Joel James. The Body of Compassion: Ethics, Medicine, and the Church.Patrick Guinan - 2003 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 3 (3):642-644.
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  11.  8
    The Christian Origin of Medical Compassion.Patrick Guinan - 2005 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 5 (2):243-248.
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  12.  15
    Trusting Doctors: The Decline of Moral Authority in American Medicine by Jonathan B. Imber.Patrick Guinan - 2010 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 10 (3):620-622.
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  13.  22
    The Renaissance Hospital: Healing the Body and Healing the Soul by John Henderson.Patrick Guinan & Thomas Planek - 2008 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 8 (3):584-586.
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