Results for 'Patient choice'

990 found
Order:
  1.  35
    Patient Choices, Family Interests, and Physician Obligations.Thomas A. Mappes & Jane S. Zembaty - 1994 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 4 (1):27-46.
    Recent articles in biomedical ethics have begun to explore both the relevance of family interests in treatment decisions and the resultant ramifications for physicians' obligations to patients. This article addresses two important questions regarding physicians' obligations vis-a-vis family interests: (1) What should a physician do when the exercise of patient autonomy threatens to negate the patient's moral obligations to other family members? (2) Does respect for patient autonomy typically require efforts on the part of physicians to keep (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  2.  27
    Patients' Choices for Return of Exome Sequencing Results to Relatives in the Event of Their Death.Laura M. Amendola, Martha Horike-Pyne, Susan B. Trinidad, Stephanie M. Fullerton, Barbara J. Evans, Wylie Burke & Gail P. Jarvik - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):476-485.
    The informed consent process for genetic testing does not commonly address preferences regarding disclosure of results in the event of the patient's death. Adults being tested for familial colorectal cancer were asked whether they want their exome sequencing results disclosed to another person in the event of their death prior to receiving the results. Of 78 participants, 92% designated an individual and 8% declined to. Further research will help refine practices for informed consent.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3.  9
    Patient choice or patient abandoned?Roy Calne, Jane Calne & Suzanne Calne - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (6):996-999.
  4.  21
    Patient Choice and Preventive Genomic Sequencing—More Trouble Upstream.Søren Holm & Thomas Ploug - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (7):24-26.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5.  61
    Incentivizing Patient Choices: The Ethics of Inclusive Shared Savings.Richard Yetter Chappell - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (6):597-600.
    Is it ethical to pay patients for selecting cheaper medical treatments? The healthcare system in the United States is notoriously profligate, at least in part because when insurers foot the bill, patients have little incentive to avoid wasteful treatments. One familiar means for dealing with this problem is for insurers to offer reduced co-pays to patients who select cheaper treatments. Would it be ethical to take this one step further, beyond the zero bound, sharing the savings of cheaper treatments by (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  15
    Limited patient choice within the Military Health System.Brian T. Ipock - 2018 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 8 (1):92-95.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  38
    The claim for patient choice and equity.D. A. Barr, L. Fenton & D. Blane - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (4):271-274.
    Recently, commentators close to and within the UK government have claimed that patient choice can increase equity in the context of the National Health Service. This article critically examines the basis for this claim through analysis of recent speeches and publications authored by secretaries of state for health and their policy advisers. It is concluded that this claim has not developed prospectively from an analysis of the causes of healthcare inequity, or even with a consistent normative definition of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8. Shared Decision Making, Paternalism and Patient Choice.Lars Sandman & Christian Munthe - 2010 - Health Care Analysis 18 (1):60-84.
    In patient centred care, shared decision making is a central feature and widely referred to as a norm for patient centred medical consultation. However, it is far from clear how to distinguish SDM from standard models and ideals for medical decision making, such as paternalism and patient choice, and e.g., whether paternalism and patient choice can involve a greater degree of the sort of sharing involved in SDM and still retain their essential features. In (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   52 citations  
  9.  12
    Religious Hospitals and Patient Choice.Nadia N. Sawicki - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (6):8-9.
    Recent media reports have drawn widespread attention to the experiences of patients who are denied reproductive services at Catholic hospitals. For some patients, such as those experiencing miscarriage, denial of appropriate treatment can lead to serious health consequences. However, many patients are unaware of the limitations on services available at religiously affiliated health care institutions. As a result, patients’ ability to make informed and autonomous decisions about where to seek treatment is hindered. There are currently no federal or state laws (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  62
    The ethics of Cesarean section on maternal request: A feminist critique of the american college of obstetricians and gynecologists' position on patient-choice surgery.Veronique Bergeron - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (9):478–487.
    ABSTRACT In recent years, the medical establishment has been speaking in favor of women's autonomy in childbirth by advocating cesarean delivery on maternal request (CDMR). This paper offers to look at the ethical dimension of CDMR through a feminist critique of the medicalization of childbirth and its influence on present‐day medical ethics. I claim that the medicalization of childbirth reflects a sexist bias with regard to conceptions of the body and needs to be used with caution when applied to women's (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  11.  14
    Measuring improved patient choice.Margaret Holmes‐Rovner & David R. Rovner - 2000 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 6 (3):263-272.
  12. Responsibility and the limits of patient choice.Benjamin Davies - 2020 - Bioethics 34 (5):459-466.
    Patients are generally assumed to have the right to choices about treatment, including the right to refuse treatment, which is constrained by considerations of cost‐effectiveness. Independently, many people support the idea that patients who are responsible for their ill health should incur penalties that non‐responsible patients do not face. Surprisingly, these two areas have not received much joint attention. This paper considers whether restricting the scope of responsibility to pre‐treatment decisions can be justified, or whether a demand to hold people (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  22
    The Continuing Evolution of Ethical Standards for Genomic Sequencing in Clinical Care: Restoring Patient Choice.Susan M. Wolf - 2017 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 45 (3):333-340.
    Developing ethical standards for clinical use of large-scale genome and exome sequencing has proven challenging, in part due to the inevitability of incidental or secondary findings. Policy of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics has evolved but remains problematic. In 2013, ACMG issued policy recommending mandatory analysis of 56 extra genes whenever sequencing was ordered for any indication, in order to ascertain positive findings in pathogenic and actionable genes. Widespread objection yielded a 2014 amendment allowing patients to opt-out (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  14. Agency and authenticity: Which value grounds patient choice?Daniel Brudney & John Lantos - 2011 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (4):217-227.
    In current American medical practice, autonomy is assumed to be more valuable than human life: if a patient autonomously refuses lifesaving treatment, the doctors are supposed to let him die. In this paper we discuss two values that might be at stake in such clinical contexts. Usually, we hear only of autonomy and best interests. However, here, autonomy is ambiguous between two concepts—concepts that are tied to different values and to different philosophical traditions. In some cases, the two values (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  15.  34
    Looking for Trouble: Preventive Genomic Sequencing in the General Population and the Role of Patient Choice.Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz, John M. Conley, Arlene M. Davis, Marcia Van Riper, Rebecca L. Walker & Eric T. Juengst - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (7):3-14.
    Advances in genomics have led to calls for developing population-based preventive genomic sequencing programs with the goal of identifying genetic health risks in adults without known risk factors. One critical issue for minimizing the harms and maximizing the benefits of PGS is determining the kind and degree of control individuals should have over the generation, use, and handling of their genomic information. In this article we examine whether PGS programs should offer individuals the opportunity to selectively opt out of the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  16.  24
    Aligning Ethics with Medical Decision-Making: The Quest for Informed Patient Choice.Benjamin Moulton & Jaime S. King - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (1):85-97.
    Medical practice should evolve alongside medical ethics. As our understanding of the ethical implications of physician-patient interactions becomes more nuanced, physicians should integrate those lessons into practice. As early as the 1930s, epidemiological studies began to identify that the rates of medical procedures varied significantly along geographic and socioeconomic lines. Dr. J. Alison Glover recognized that tonsillectomy rates in school children in certain school districts in England and Wales were in some cases eight times the rates of children in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  17.  36
    Aligning Ethics with Medical Decision-Making: The Quest for Informed Patient Choice.Benjamin Moulton & Jaime S. King - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (1):85-97.
    Clinical evidence suggests that many patients undergo surgery that they would decline if fully informed. Failure to communicate the relevant risks, benefits, and alternatives of a procedure violates medical ethics and wastes medical resources. Integrating shared decision-making, a method of communication between provider and patient, into medical decisions can satisfy physicians' ethical obligations and reduce unwanted procedures. This article proposes a three-step process for implementing a nationwide practice of shared decision-making: create model integration programs; provide legal incentives to ease (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  18.  13
    Patient satisfaction with NHS elective tonsillectomy outsourced to the private sector under the Patient Choice Programme.Shalini Patiar, Stephen Lo, Shyam Duvvi & Paul Dr Spraggs - 2006 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (5):569-572.
  19.  14
    Improving efficiency and value in health care Intravenous iron management for anaemia associated with chronic kidney disease: linking treatment to an outpatient clinic, optimizing service provision and patient choice.Sunil Bhandari & Sarah Naudeer - 2008 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (6):996-1001.
  20.  25
    A Fair Range of Choice: Justifying Maximum Patient Choice in the British National Health Service. [REVIEW]Stephen Wilmot - 2007 - Health Care Analysis 15 (2):59-72.
    In this paper I put forward an ethical argument for the provision of extensive patient choice by the British National Health Service. I base this argument on traditional liberal rights to freedom of choice, on a welfare right to health care, and on a view of health as values-based. I argue that choice, to be ethically sustainable on this basis, must be values-based and rational. I also consider whether the British taxpayer may be persuadable with regard (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21.  22
    An Actual Advance in Advance Directives: Moving from Patient Choices to Patient Voices in Advance Care Planning.Virginia L. Bartlett & Stuart G. Finder - 2018 - Asian Bioethics Review 10 (1):21-36.
    Since the concept of the living wills emerged nearly 50 years ago, there have been practical challenges in translating the concept of an advance directive into documents that are clinically useful across various healthcare settings and among different patient populations and cultures. Especially, challenging has been the reliance in most ADs on pre-selected “choices” about specific interventions which either revolve around broad themes or whether or not to utilize particular interventions, both of which about most laypersons know little and, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  8
    The decline of medical confidentiality medical information management: The illusion of patient choice.Ingrid Ann Whiteman - 2015 - Clinical Ethics 10 (3):47-58.
    It is reasonable to consider and trust that information taken from us about our medical health and history will be protected by rules on confidentiality and consent. Apart from very rare cases, perhaps of major public interest or for public health reasons, this information will not be shared with others without our consent. However, both a number of reforms in National Health Service patient data management policy and developments in the general law on privacy challenge this traditional view of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. The physician's influence on patients' choices.Thomas Tomlinson - 1986 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 7 (2).
    Although the traditional physician ethic sees nothing objectionable about the doctor's influence over patients, superficial conceptions of the patient's right to self-determination imply that this influence may be manipulative. On the contrary, there are several different lines of argument which can reconcile self-determination with the physician's influence. Nevertheless, drawing the boundaries between legitimate methods of persuasion, and manipulation or coercion sometimes proves difficult.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24.  43
    Conflicting Values: A Case Study in Patient Choice and Caregiver Perspectives.Margot M. Eves, Phoebe Day Danziger, Ruth M. Farrell & Cristie M. Cole - 2015 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 5 (2):167-178.
    Decisions related to births in the “gray zone” of periviability are particularly challenging. Despite published management guidelines, clinicians and families struggle to negotiate care management plans. Stakeholders must reconcile conflicting values in the context of evolving circumstances with a high degree of uncertainty within a short time period. Even skilled clinicians may struggle to guide the patient in making value–laden decisions without imposing their own values. Exploring the experiences of one pregnant woman and her caregivers, this case study highlights (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  2
    The Community Blood Supply and Patients' Choice.Carol Levine - 1987 - Hastings Center Report 17 (2):5-5.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  19
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Looking for Trouble: Preventive Genomic Sequencing in the General Population and the Role of Patient Choice”.Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz, John M. Conley, Arlene M. Davis, Marcia Van Riper, Rebecca L. Walker & Eric T. Juengst - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (12):6-9.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  48
    Choosing a doctor: an exploratory study of factors influencing patients' choice of a primary care doctor.Brian H. Bornstein, David Marcus & William Cassidy - 2000 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 6 (3):255-262.
  28.  18
    Tailoring urological outpatient services to patient choice.Stephen J. Bromage, Iain G. McIntyre, Richard D. Napier-Hemy, Stephen R. Payne & Ian Pearce - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (3):476-479.
  29. Free Choice and Patient Best Interests.Emma C. Bullock - 2016 - Health Care Analysis 24 (4):374-392.
    In medical practice, the doctrine of informed consent is generally understood to have priority over the medical practitioner’s duty of care to her patient. A common consequentialist argument for the prioritisation of informed consent above the duty of care involves the claim that respect for a patient’s free choice is the best way of protecting that patient’s best interests; since the patient has a special expertise over her values and preferences regarding non-medical goods she is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  30. Patient Informed Choice for Altruism.David J. Doukas & John Hardwig - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (4):397-402.
    Abstract:Respect for persons protects patients regarding their own healthcare decisions. Patient informed choice for altruism (PICA) is a proposed means for a fully autonomous patient with decisionmaking capacity to limit his or her own treatment for altruistic reasons. An altruistic decision could bond the patient with others at the end of life. We contend that PICA can also be an advance directive option. The proxy, family, and physicians must be reminded that a patient’s altruistic treatment (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  14
    Medical choices, medical chances: how patients, families, and physicians can cope with uncertainty.Harold Bursztajn (ed.) - 1981 - New York: Routledge.
    Considered ahead of its time since the first publication in 1981, Medical Choices, Medical Chances provides a telescope for viewing how developments in the fields of medical research, medical technology, and health care organization are likely to influence the doctor-patient relationship in the 21st Century. The book explores this intricate web of relationships among doctors, patients, and families and offers a new framework for mastering the emotional and intellectual challenges of uncertainty, while at the same time providing tools for (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  32.  71
    Patient autonomy and choice in healthcare: self-testing devices as a case in point.Anna-Marie Greaney, Dónal P. O’Mathúna & P. Anne Scott - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (4):383-395.
    This paper aims to critique the phenomenon of advanced patient autonomy and choice in healthcare within the specific context of self-testing devices. A growing number of self-testing medical devices are currently available for home use. The premise underpinning many of these devices is that they assist individuals to be more autonomous in the assessment and management of their health. Increased patient autonomy is assumed to be a good thing. We take issue with this assumption and argue that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  33.  44
    Choices of japanese patients in the face of disagreement.Atsushi Asai, Minako Kishino, Tsuguya Fukui, Masahiko Sakai, Masako Yokota, Kazumi Nakata, Sumiko Sasakabe, Kiyomi Sawada & Fumie Kaiji - 1998 - Bioethics 12 (2):162–172.
    Background: Patients in different countries have different attitudes toward self‐determination and medical information. Little is known how much respect Japanese patients feel should be given for their wishes about medical care and for medical information, and what choices they would make in the face of disagreement. Methods: Ambulatory patients in six clinics of internal medicine at a university hospital were surveyed using a self‐administered questionnaire. Results: A total of 307 patients participated in our survey. Of the respondents, 47% would accept (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  34.  18
    Patients accept therapy using embryonic stem cells for Parkinson’s disease: a discrete choice experiment.Jennifer Viberg Johansson, Mats Hansson, Elena Jiltsova, Trinette van Vliet, Hakan Widner, Dag Nyholm, Jorien Veldwijk, Catharina Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Jennifer Drevin & Karin Schölin Bywall - 2023 - BMC Medical Ethics 24 (1):1-13.
    BackgroundNew disease-modifying ways to treat Parkinson’s disease (PD) may soon become a reality with intracerebral transplantation of cell products produced from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). The aim of this study was to assess what factors influence preferences of patients with PD regarding stem-cell based therapies to treat PD in the future.MethodsPatients with PD were invited to complete a web-based discrete choice experiment to assess the importance of the following attributes: (i) type of treatment, (ii) aim of treatment, (iii) (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  20
    Reining in patient and individual choice.Mark Sheehan - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (5):291-292.
    Patient choice, we might think, is the popular version of the ideas of informed consent and the principle of respect for autonomy and intimately connected to the politics of liberal individualism. There are various accounts to be given for why patient choice, in all its forms, has dominated thinking in bioethics and popular culture. All of them, I suggest, will make reference to the decline of paternalism. The bad old days of ‘doctor knows best’ are gone (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36.  86
    Existential autonomy: why patients should make their own choices.H. Madder - 1997 - Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (4):221-225.
    Savulescu has recently introduced the "rational non-interventional paternalist" model of the patient-doctor relationship. This paper addresses objections to such a model from the perspective of an anaesthetist. Patients need to make their own decisions if they are to be fully autonomous. Rational non-interventional paternalism undermines the importance of patient choice and so threatens autonomy. Doctors should provide an evaluative judgment of the best medical course of action, but ought to restrict themselves to helping patients to make their (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  37.  18
    The Patient's Choice: A New Treatise By Galen.Vivian Nutton - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (01):236-.
    The historian of ancient medicine has in recent years enjoyed one advantage over his more literary colleagues, the regular accession of substantial new texts by major authors. These have included not only fragments preserved on papyri and the membra disiecta gathered from later encyclopaedias and medical writings, but also complete treatises, some consisting of several books. There is, however, one drawback. Very few of these new texts are preserved in their original language, or even in a mediaeval Latin translation; most (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  38. Color Choice Preference in Cognitively Impaired Patients: A Look Inside Alzheimer’s Disease Through the Use of Lüscher Color Diagnostic.Michelangelo Stanzani Maserati, Micaela Mitolo, Federica Medici, Renato D’Onofrio, Federico Oppi, Roberto Poda, Maddalena De Matteis, Caterina Tonon, Raffaele Lodi, Rocco Liguori & Sabina Capellari - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
  39.  5
    The patient's choice.B. J. Crigger - 1991 - Hastings Center Report 21 (6):4.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  21
    Making Patients Pay for Their Life-Style Choices.Robert L. Schwartz - 1992 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (4):393.
    Smokers impose a terrible cost on all of the rest of us. Those who choose to smoke are more likely than nonsmokers to suffer from cancer, heart disease, and a host of other diseases that require intensive and expensive medical intervention. Although they may suffer these diseases, we all pay for their habit through higher healthcare costs, which are reflected in higher insurance premiums, higher taxes, and fewer healthcare resources available for nonsmokers. It is simply unfair for smokers to impose (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  7
    Personal Choices: Communication Between Physicians and Patients When Confronting Critical Illness.Robert L. Fine - 1991 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 2 (1):57-62.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42.  17
    Hard Choices for Vulnerable Patients: Some Lessons Learned That May Apply.Arthur L. Caplan & Lisa Kearns - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (10):68-69.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43. XV—Agents and Patients, or: What We Learn About Reasons for Action by Reflecting on Our Choices in Process‐of‐Thought Cases.Michael Smith - 2012 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 112 (3pt3):309-331.
    Can we draw substantive conclusions about the reasons for action agents have from premisses about the desires of their idealized counterparts? The answer is that we can. The argument for this conclusion is Rawlsian in spirit, focusing on the choices that our idealized counterparts must make simply in virtue of being ideal, and inferring from these choices the contents of the desires that they must have. It turns out that our idealized counterparts must have desires in which we ourselves figure (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  44.  23
    Patient Autonomy and the Unfortunate Choice between Repatriation and Suboptimal Treatment.Kevin Wack & Toby Schonfeld - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (9):6-7.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 9, Page 6-7, September 2012.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  4
    Improving Patient-Doctor Communication about Risk and Choice in Obstetrics and Gynecology through Medical Education: A Call for Action.Kathryn Mills, Rizwana Biviji-Sharma, Jennifer Chevinsky & Macey L. Henderson - 2014 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 25 (2):176-176.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  16
    A patient's choice.F. Nenner - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (9):554-555.
    Lilly has a story to tell. It is her story. She sits comfortably in her hospital bed, with a nasal cannula under her nose providing a steady stream of oxygen. She says she really does not need it now but is more comfortable with it. She straightens the hem of her hospital gown. She folds her hands and places them carefully on her lap. This diminutive, carefully groomed elderly woman, a widow for 7 years, likes to be presentable when she (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  13
    Impossible Choices: When Patients and Careproviders Face Impossible Decisions.Edmund G. Howe - 1995 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 6 (1):3-13.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  41
    Fallacy or Functionality: Law and Policy of Patient Treatment Choice in the NHS.Maria K. Sheppard - 2016 - Health Care Analysis 24 (4):279-300.
    It has been claimed that beneath the government rhetoric of patient choice, no real choice exists either in law or in National Health Service policy. Thus, choice is considered to be a fallacy in that patients are not able to demand specific treatment, but are only able to express preferences amongst the available options. This article argues that, rather than considering choice only in terms of patient autonomy or consumer rights, choice ought to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  10
    The Grand Inquisitor’s Choice: Comment on the CEJA Report on Withholding Information from Patients.Darlyn Pirakitikulr & Harold J. Bursztajn - 2006 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (4):307-311.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50.  11
    What do patients value as incentives for participation in clinical trials? A pilot discrete choice experiment.Akke Vellinga, Colum Devine, Min Yun Ho, Colin Clarke, Patrick Leahy, Jane Bourke, Declan Devane, Sinead Duane & Patricia Kearney - 2020 - Research Ethics 16 (1-2):1-12.
    Incentivising has shown to improve participation in clinical trials. However, ethical concerns suggest that incentives may be coercive, obscure trial risks and encourage individuals to enrol in cli...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 990