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Patricia McKeever [6]P. McKeever [2]
  1.  8
    Disability and Deleuze: An Exploration of Becoming and Embodiment in Children’s Everyday Environments.Patricia McKeever, Susan Ruddick & Lindsay Stephens - 2015 - Body and Society 21 (2):194-220.
    Building on Deleuze’s theories of the becoming of bodies, and notions of the geographic maturity of the disabled body we formulate an emplaced model of disability wherein bodies, social expectations and built form intersect in embodied experiences in specific environments to increase or decrease the capacity of disabled children to act in those environments. We join a growing effort to generate a more comprehensive model of disability, which moves beyond a binary between the individual and the social. Drawing on in-depth (...)
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  2.  18
    Using puppetry to elicit children's talk for research.Iris Epstein, Bonnie Stevens, Patricia McKeever, Sylvain Baruchel & Heather Jones - 2008 - Nursing Inquiry 15 (1):49-56.
    Although puppets have been employed by various disciplines in clinical and community (e.g. homes and schools) environments, little has been written about their use as a communication tool in research. In this article, a critical review of the literature is undertaken integrating the use of puppets in a qualitative research study exploring children's perspectives on and responses to a camp for children with cancer. Methodological considerations and ethical issues of using puppets as a data collection technique are discussed. Although some (...)
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  3.  54
    Disability, technology, and place: Social and ethical implications of long-term dependency on medical devices.B. E. Gibson, R. E. G. Upshur, N. L. Young & P. McKeever - 2007 - Ethics, Place and Environment 10 (1):7 – 28.
    Medical technologies and assistive devices such as ventilators and power wheelchairs are designed to sustain life and/or improve functionality but they can also contribute to stigmatization and social exclusion. In this paper, drawing from a study of ten men with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, we explore the complex social processes that mediate the lives of persons who are dependent on multiple medical and assistive technologies. In doing so we consider the embodied and emplaced nature of disability and how life is lived (...)
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  4.  25
    Disability, Technology, and Place: Social and Ethical Implications of Long-Term Dependency on Medical Devices.B. E. Gibson, R. E. G. Upshur, N. L. Young & P. McKeever - 2007 - Ethics, Place and Environment 10 (1):7-28.
    Medical technologies and assistive devices such as ventilators and power wheelchairs are designed to sustain life and/or improve functionality but they can also contribute to stigmatization and social exclusion. In this paper, drawing from a study of ten men with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, we explore the complex social processes that mediate the lives of persons who are dependent on multiple medical and assistive technologies. In doing so we consider the embodied and emplaced nature of disability and how life is lived (...)
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  5.  25
    Bourdieu at the bedside: briefing parents in a pediatric hospital.Karen LeGrow, Ellen Hodnett, Robyn Stremler, Patricia McKeever & Eyal Cohen - 2014 - Nursing Inquiry 21 (4):327-335.
    The philosophy of family‐centered care (FCC) promotes partnerships between families and staff to plan, deliver, and evaluate services for children and has been officially adopted by a majority of pediatric hospitals throughout North America. However, studies indicated that many parents have continued to be dissatisfied with their decision‐making roles in their child's care. This is particularly salient for parents of children with chronic ongoing complex health problems. These children are dependent upon medical technology and require frequent hospitalizations during which parents (...)
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  6.  8
    Diagramming Disability: A Deleuzian Approach to Researching Childhood Disability.Patricia McKeever, Lindsay Stephens & Sue Ruddick - 2021 - Deleuze and Guattari Studies 15 (1):15-39.
    This article presents diagrams developed from the insights of three middle school children with limited mobility about their experiences navigating social and spatial relations in their home, school and neighbourhoods. The paper explores the concept of assemblage as well as operationalising the Deleuzian idea of the diagram. The diagrams we produce are developed in connection with dominant idealisations of neighbourhood and home range that function in North America to choreograph children's progression from infancy through adolescence. We undertake this diagramming in (...)
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  7.  27
    The family: long‐term care research and policy formulation.Patricia McKeever - 1996 - Nursing Inquiry 3 (4):200-206.
    In industrialized democracies, contractionist social welfare policies have transformed healthcare systems. This has led to reallocations of long‐term care work that have perpetuated gender inequities. The appropriated work of female family caregivers substitutes for paid nursing work, and the household is the primary site for long‐term care delivery. In this article, central premises of critical social theory are used to analyse current long‐term care policy and to explicate how research facilitated the development of mixed economies of care. Problematic consequences of (...)
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  8.  64
    Unstable Embodiments: A Phenomenological Interpretation of Patient Satisfaction with Treatment Outcome. [REVIEW]Pamela L. Hudak, Patricia McKeever & James G. Wright - 2007 - Journal of Medical Humanities 28 (1):31-44.
    Many patients experience aspects of treatment and care as dehumanizing because the body is considered separate from the self and its life context. An attempt to transcend viewing persons in dualistic terms is posed by phenomenologists who focus not on “the body” as such but on what it means to be “embodied.” In this paper, we review the relevance of the phenomenology of the body for health care and report the results of comparing Sally Gadow’s phenomenological insights about body-self unity (...)
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