Results for 'P. M. Baldo'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  14
    Study of defect evolution by TEM within situion irradiation and coordinated modeling.Meimei Li, M. A. Kirk, P. M. Baldo, Donghua Xu & B. D. Wirth - 2012 - Philosophical Magazine 92 (16):2048-2078.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2. The rise and fall of the picture theory.P. M. S. Hacker - 1981 - In Irving Block & Ludwig Wittgenstein (eds.), Perspectives on the philosophy of Wittgenstein. Cambridge: MIT Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  3. Gordon Baker's late interpretation of Wittgenstein.P. M. S. Hacker - 2007 - In Guy Kahane, Edward Kanterian & Oskari Kuusela (eds.), Wittgenstein and His Interpreters: Essays in Memory of Gordon Baker. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 88--122.
    Gordon Baker and I had been colleagues at St John’s for almost ten years when we resolved, in 1976, to undertake the task of writing a commentary on Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations. We had been talking about Wittgenstein since 1969, and when we cooperated in writing a long critical notice on the Philosophical Grammar in 1975, we found that working together was mutually instructive, intellectually stimulating and great fun. We thought that we still had much to say about Wittgenstein’s philosophy, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  4.  9
    Gordon Baker's Late Interpretation of Wittgenstein.P. M. S. Hacker - 2007 - In Guy Kahane, Edward Kanterian & Oskari Kuusela (eds.), Wittgenstein and His Interpreters: Essays in Memory of Gordon Baker. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 88–122.
    This chapter contains section titled: Baker's New Conception Waismann and Wittgenstein Wittgenstein on the Psychoanalytic Analogy Wittgenstein's Methodology Reconsidered Wittgenstein and Ryle 1: Categorial Confusions Wittgenstein and Ryle 2: Logical Geography Baker's Wittgenstein.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5.  12
    Sympathy and Empathy.P. M. S. Hacker - 1976 - In Robert C. Solomon (ed.), The passions. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 357–392.
    Sympathy, empathy, and compassion are strands in the network of love and essential corollaries of friendship. Together with love and friendship, they are the saving graces of mankind. This chapter aims to clarify the relationship between sympathy and empathy. It may be helpful first to list the relevant dispositions, tendencies, powers, and feelings. The most important contributions to the analysis of sympathy were Hume's A Treatise of Human Nature and Adam Smith's The Theory of Moral Sentiments. It was they who (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  12
    Shame, Embarrassment, and Guilt.P. M. S. Hacker - 1976 - In Robert C. Solomon (ed.), The passions. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 152–182.
    The distinction between shame cultures and guilt cultures is due to the anthropologist Ruth Benedict. The moral education of the youth in a shame culture will involve a multitude of prescriptions determining how to conduct oneself. Heroic societies with a closed aristocratic warrior class are typically shame cultures. The form of the dominant norms of a guilt culture is the imperative or dominative tense, which determines what one is obligated to do. This is the typical form of the obligation‐imposing commandments (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7.  3
    Metaphysics.P. M. S. Hacker - 2017 - In Hans-Johann Glock & John Hyman (eds.), A Companion to Wittgenstein. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 209–227.
    Throughout its long history metaphysics has been variously conceived. At its most sublime, it has been taken to be the study of the super‐sensible, in particular of the existence of a god, the nature of the soul, and the possibility of an afterlife. When the young Ludwig Wittgenstein entered the lists, it was entirely reasonable to conceive of metaphysics in this manner. Its subject matter was held to be the language‐independent and thought‐independent de re necessities of the world. The Tractatus (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8. Appendix.P. M. S. Hacker - 1976 - In Robert C. Solomon (ed.), The passions. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 393–437.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  3
    Anger.P. M. S. Hacker - 1976 - In Robert C. Solomon (ed.), The passions. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 232–264.
    Given the ubiquity of the phenomena of anger and the roots of the emotion in the animal nature, it is not surprising that human languages have a rich vocabulary to express, report, describe, and evaluate the various manifestations and expressions of anger. Different cultures and different languages have evolved their distinctive orgetic vocabularies. This chapter is concerned with the family of concepts of anger, as expressed in English. The doctrine of the humours is reflected in the iconography of anger. Eichler's (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  8
    Envy.P. M. S. Hacker - 1976 - In Robert C. Solomon (ed.), The passions. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 183–207.
    Actions done out of jealousy or envy are vicious. The corresponding character traits – having a jealous or envious disposition – are vices. Envy motivates ever greater efforts in the pursuit of private wealth, and, coupled with greed and covetousness, stimulates acquisitive competition, thus benefiting the economy. Envy is often linked to Schadenfreude. Jealousy characteristically involves hostility if not hatred towards the person who is taking away the love one feels is due to one, and engenders bitterness, hostility, or hatred (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Index.P. M. S. Hacker - 1976 - In Robert C. Solomon (ed.), The passions. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 438–451.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  6
    Jealousy.P. M. S. Hacker - 1976 - In Robert C. Solomon (ed.), The passions. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 208–231.
    Jealousy often wreaks havoc among those who love each other. There are many different forms of jealousy. These can be brought to light by scrutiny of grammar, which discloses the scope and limits of the concept of jealousy and hence too of the emotion it subsumes. In Bronzino's painting, Jealousy has a livid complexion (a mixture of yellow and black bile). Robert Herrick's poem in Anthony Frederick Sandys's painting, however, associates jealousy with yellow. In this, he too was following the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  7
    Pride, Arrogance, and Humility.P. M. S. Hacker - 1976 - In Robert C. Solomon (ed.), The passions. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 129–151.
    Each person should have their pride – a proper sense of their worth and dignity. Improper pride is arrogance; proper pride, one might say, is necessary for self‐respect. As an emotion, pride may take the form of a momentary emotional occurrence, as when, for example, one is complimented by people whose approval one appreciates on some achievement of one's own, of one's spouse, or of one's children. Pride may also take the form of a persistent, enduring, emotion, as when one (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  1
    The Analytic of the Emotions I.P. M. S. Hacker - 1976 - In Robert C. Solomon (ed.), The passions. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 37–59.
    The emotions distinctive of human beings, as opposed to other animals, are emotions that presuppose possession of a language and hence powers of intellect and rational will. The objects distinctive of human emotions presuppose mastery of a language and possession of rational abilities. Music itself has been considered to be the purest artistic expression of human emotions and of the striving of the human will. The emotions, in particular temporary emotions, have characteristic multiple associations, manifestations, and forms of expression. This (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  6
    The Analytic of the Emotions II.P. M. S. Hacker - 1976 - In Robert C. Solomon (ed.), The passions. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 60–82.
    Manifestations and expressions of emotion are elements of an ensemble of immediate reactive and responsive behaviour, emotion‐eliciting situation, past relationships and events, persistent emotions exhibited in intentional and emotionally motivated speech and action. These elements form, and reform, highly complex patterns – but, like the patterns of tribal carpets, the patterns display varying degrees of irregularity and asymmetry, which vary from rug to rug. The constitutional indeterminacy of the emotions, of their depth and authenticity, and of the motives to which (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  4
    The Place of the Emotions among the Passions.P. M. S. Hacker - 1976 - In Robert C. Solomon (ed.), The passions. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 1–36.
    Passions subsumes the natural human appetites (hunger, thirst, lust, and addictions); felt desires, such as urges, cravings, and impulses; some obsessions (obsessive emotions and compulsive obsessions); and the affections (agitations, moods, and emotions) of a living being. It is important to clarify the concept of emotion that is to locate it among the concepts of the passions thus construed, and to describe the differences between emotions and other passions. This chapter describes the conceptual boundaries that distinguish the emotions from other (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  99
    Wittgenstein, meaning and mind.P. M. S. Hacker (ed.) - 1990 - Cambridge, Mass., USA: Blackwell.
    ... 243-) INTRODUCTION §§243- constitute the eighth 'chapter' of the book. Its point of departure is a natural query with respect to the conclusion of the ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   60 citations  
  18. Wittgenstein's Tractatus logico-philosophicus.P. M. S. Hacker - 1988 - In Roy Harris (ed.), Linguistic thought in England, 1914-1945. New York: Routledge.
  19.  3
    Darwinismo y sociedad en Cuba: siglo XIX.P. M. Pruna - 1989 - Madrid: Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas. Edited by Armando García González.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Simulation of cortex visual cells for texture segmentation: foveal and parafoveal projections.P. M. Palagi & A. Guérin-Dugué - 1996 - In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Perception. Ridgeview. pp. 30-30.
  21.  16
    The Place of Death in Human Life.P. M. S. Hacker - 2021 - In The Moral Powers. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 334–360.
    Throughout much of human history most people conceived of death as a transitional event. An alternative, secular, conception of death is as the permanent cessation of all life‐sustaining biological functions. The death of the physical organism is the death of the person or human being. However death be conceived, human beings are the only creatures that are aware of their mortality. The death penalty is often thought to be the most severe punishment of all, far worse than life imprisonment. Attitudes (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  13
    Pleasure and Enjoyment.P. M. S. Hacker - 2021 - In The Moral Powers. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 207–242.
    Entertainments and celebrations are meant to give audiences and participants pleasure. Pleasure and enjoyment are an integral part of flourishing human life, and the desire for pleasure and enjoyment is a distinctive aspect of human nature. Psychological hedonism is a descriptive doctrine concerned with giving an account of actual human motivation. Ethical hedonism is a prescriptive doctrine that advances the view that human beings ought to pursue pleasure and avoid pain, that prospective pleasure and pain are severally the only good (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Appendix 2: Diabology.P. M. S. Hacker - 2021 - In The Moral Powers. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 390–397.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Appendix 3: Hannah Arendt and the Banality of Evil.P. M. S. Hacker - 2021 - In The Moral Powers. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 398–406.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Appendix 1: On Animal Beliefs and Animal Morality.P. M. S. Hacker - 2021 - In The Moral Powers. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 361–389.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Appendix 4: The Pictorial Representation of Pleasure in Western Art.P. M. S. Hacker - 2021 - In The Moral Powers. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 407–411.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  7
    Evil and the Death of the Soul.P. M. S. Hacker - 2021 - In The Moral Powers. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 129–154.
    The powers of intellect and will, possession of which is constitutive of having a mind, are not powers of the mind, but of the being that has a mind. The Platonic metaphysical conception of the soul is of great interest irrespective of its informing both ancient and Renaissance neo‐Platonist ideas about the soul and its immortality, and, via Augustine, ultimately moulding the misconceived Cartesian conception of the soul. The dividing line between the soul and the flesh is quite different from (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  3
    Explanations of Evil.P. M. S. Hacker - 2021 - In The Moral Powers. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 101–128.
    Some of human evil is a function of the historical stage of society. The evils and wickednesses of bureaucracy are as old as well‐developed bureaucratic hierarchies. Evil‐doers have character traits that may form recognizable patterns with explanatory weight. Evil‐doers produce reasons for their evil‐doing and offer justifications for their evil deeds. Psychological experiments may indeed establish important correlations and statistical probabilities that may be crucial for the formation of intelligent social policy. The greatest students of the place of evil in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  9
    Fatalism and Determinism.P. M. S. Hacker - 2021 - In The Moral Powers. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 155–178.
    Global fatalism is an attitude towards life, an attitude of resignation and acceptance of what happens. Global fatalism in the form of predestinarianism is typically, but not exclusively, associated with monotheism rather than with polytheism, and in particular with Christianity and Islam. An individual form of fatalism consists in the belief that specific incidents in a person's life are preordained. Local fatalism appears to be common to many different cultures and societies. Individual fatalism is associated with other important events in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  6
    Happiness.P. M. S. Hacker - 2021 - In The Moral Powers. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 243–280.
    Happiness has been at the centre of philosophical reflection ever since Plato and Aristotle. Epicureans thought of happiness as the satisfaction of one's minimal needs and the absence of further desires. True happiness may be the love of another, or successful and virtuous public service recognized by society, or successful engagement in a favoured activity. Youthful happiness involves intensity of feeling, engagement with the passing moment, the discovery of first love and of sexuality, and the joys of dedication to a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Index.P. M. S. Hacker - 2021 - In The Moral Powers. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 412–424.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  5
    Neuroscientific Determinism, Freedom, and Responsibility.P. M. S. Hacker - 2021 - In The Moral Powers. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 179–206.
    The most common form of determinism in the first quarter of the twenty‐first century is neuroscientific determinism. Global neuroscientific determinism is a blank cheque on a non‐existent bank. Neuroscientists have discovered the character of the neural activity in the premotor cortex immediately antecedent to movement, and the nature of the neural impulses from the brain to the muscles in the relevant limb that will make them severally contract or relax. Being rational, being free, and being responsible for our actions and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  2
    The Need for Meaning.P. M. S. Hacker - 2021 - In The Moral Powers. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 305–333.
    A life devoid of meaning is a life without happiness. But one may find meaning in one's life and in one's activities without being happy. Like pleasure and happiness, goodness and beauty, the meaningfulness one may find in one's life comes in degrees. Many achievements may mean something to a person without being of sufficient significance to lend meaning to their life, such as winning in some competitive activity or passing an important examination. Forms of illusory meaning, that is meaning (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  5
    The Roots of Value and the Nature of Morality.P. M. S. Hacker - 2021 - In The Moral Powers. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 1–32.
    The key to a perspicuous overview of axiology is the realization that all values arise from life. This chapter provides a brief overview of von Wright's categories, or ‘varieties’, of goodness. Medical goodness is the most elemental variety of natural value and disvalue. Any language‐using creature that has the skills to make and to use tools, instruments, and other artefacts is going to need the concepts of artefactual goodness and its subcategory of instrumental goodness. Morality is essentially a social phenomenon (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  6
    The Roots of Morality and the Nature of Moral Goodness.P. M. S. Hacker - 2021 - In The Moral Powers. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 33–64.
    Von Wright argued that moral goodness is a derivative form of goodness. He proceeded to give an account of the moral goodness of an act, in terms of the good of man. Philosophical anthropology must render the phenomenon of morality intelligible. This chapter suggests that the roots of moral value lie in human sympathy, in maternal love, in intuitive recognition of the humanity of others, and in the nature of loving friendship. The sentiment of sympathy is virtually ubiquitous, but sympathetic (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  3
    The Roots of Evil.P. M. S. Hacker - 2021 - In The Moral Powers. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 65–100.
    Humans are caught – in their lives, in their thoughts, in their hungers and ambitions, in their avarice and cruelty, and in their kindness and generosity too – in a net of good and evil. Natural evils are simply natural catastrophes that destroy human life, property, crops, and means of livelihood such as earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, avalanches, floods, and droughts. Some people may never recover from such evils and be incapable of leading a normal human life. The evil of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  3
    The Science of Happiness.P. M. S. Hacker - 2021 - In The Moral Powers. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 281–303.
    Modern utilitarianism has its roots in the eighteenth century, its philosophical blossom in the works of Bentham and the Mills, and its practical fruit in the works of nineteenth‐century radical legal and political utilitarian reformers. Utilitarians held that pleasure, and hence too happiness, are sensations. Human beings are in effect mere pleasure or happiness receptacles or desire‐satisfying mechanisms. The idea of a science of happiness appealed to some economists and social theorists who rightly felt increasingly ill at ease about measuring (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  79
    Errors and error correction in choice-response tasks.P. M. Rabbitt - 1966 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 71 (2):264.
  39.  87
    Human Nature: The Categorial Framework.P. M. S. Hacker - 2007 - Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.
    This major new study by one of the most penetrating and persistent critics of philosophical and scientific orthodoxy, returns to Aristotle in order to examine the salient categories in terms of which we think about ourselves and our nature, and the distinctive forms of explanation we invoke to render ourselves intelligible to ourselves. The culmination of 40 years of thought on the philosophy of mind and the nature of the mankind Written by one of the world’s leading philosophers, the co-author (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   63 citations  
  40.  26
    Computing ideal sceptical argumentation.P. M. Dung, P. Mancarella & F. Toni - 2007 - Artificial Intelligence 171 (10-15):642-674.
  41.  12
    Human Nature: The Categorial Framework.P. M. S. Hacker - 2007 - Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.
    This major study examines the most fundamental categories in terms of which we conceive of ourselves, critically surveying the concepts of substance, causation, agency, teleology, rationality, mind, body and person, and elaborating the conceptual fields in which they are embedded. The culmination of 40 years of thought on the philosophy of mind and the nature of the mankind Written by one of the world’s leading philosophers, the co-author of the monumental 4 volume _Analytical Commentary on the Philosophical Investigations_ Uses broad (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   50 citations  
  42. Insight and Illusion.P. M. S. Hacker - 1974 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):201-211.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   126 citations  
  43.  14
    Human Nature: The Categorial Framework.P. M. S. Hacker (ed.) - 2007 - Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.
    This major new study by one of the most penetrating and persistent critics of philosophical and scientific orthodoxy, returns to Aristotle in order to examine the salient categories in terms of which we think about ourselves and our nature, and the distinctive forms of explanation we invoke to render ourselves intelligible to ourselves. The culmination of 40 years of thought on the philosophy of mind and the nature of the mankind Written by one of the world’s leading philosophers, the co-author (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  44. Neurocomputational Perspective.P. M. Churchland - 1993 - Behavior and Philosophy 20 (2):75-88.
  45. Wittgenstein’s Place in Twentieth-Century Analytic Philosophy.P. M. S. Hacker - 1996 - Philosophy 73 (283):132-134.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   97 citations  
  46.  15
    Dialectic proof procedures for assumption-based, admissible argumentation.P. M. Dung, R. A. Kowalski & F. Toni - 2006 - Artificial Intelligence 170 (2):114-159.
  47.  32
    Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience (Second Edition) (2nd edition).P. M. S. Hacker & Maxwell Richard Bennett - 2022 - Chichester: Wiley Blackwell.
  48.  19
    Oh g Dr. Jensen! or, g-ing up cognitive psychology?P. M. A. Rabbitt - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (2):238-239.
  49. Insight and Illusion: Themes in the Philosophy of Wittgenstein.P. M. S. Hacker - 1989 - Philosophical Quarterly 39 (155):231-239.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   72 citations  
  50.  12
    Normality: a critical genealogy.P. M. Cryle - 2017 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Edited by Elizabeth Stephens.
    The concept of normal is so familiar that it can be hard to imagine contemporary life without it. Yet the term entered everyday speech only in the mid-twentieth century. Before that, it was solely a scientific term used primarily in medicine to refer to a general state of health and the orderly function of organs. But beginning in the middle of the twentieth century, normal broke out of scientific usage, becoming less precise and coming to mean a balanced condition to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000