Results for 'Organ transplantation'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
  1. Organ Transplantation in Times of Donor Shortage: Challenges and Solutions.Galia Assadi, Ralf J. Jox & Georg Marckmann (eds.) - 2016 - Cham: Imprint: Springer.
    This book analyzes the reasons for organ shortage and ventures innovative ideas for approaching this problem. It presents 29 contributions from a highly interdisciplinary group of world experts and upcoming professionals in the field. Every year thousands of patients die while waiting for organ transplantation. Health authorities, medical professionals and bioethicists worldwide point to the urgent and yet unsolved problem of organ shortage, which will be even intensified due to the increasing life expectancy. Even though the (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  12
    Organ Transplantation, Euthanasia, Cloning and Animal Experimentation an Islamic View.Abul Faḍl Moḥsin Ebrāhīm - 2001
    This book deal with ethico-legal issues. Muslims believe that everything they own has been given to them as an amanah from Allah. Would it constitute a breach of that trust to consent to enrol oneself as an organ donor? Cloning could rectify the problem of infertile couples, but such technology could also be abused with dire consequences. While euthanasia may apparently alleviate the suffering of the terminally ill, would that not compound their agony in the life hereafter? The author (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  3.  13
    Deceased Organ Transplantation in Bangladesh: The Dynamics of Bioethics, Religion and Culture.Md Sanwar Siraj - 2022 - HEC Forum 34 (2):139-167.
    Organ transplantation from living related donors in Bangladesh first began in October 1982, and became commonplace in 1988. Cornea transplantation from posthumous donors began in 1984 and living related liver and bone marrow donor transplantation began in 2010 and 2014 respectively. The Human Organ Transplantation Act officially came into effect in Bangladesh on 13th April 1999, allowing organ donation from both brain-dead and related living donors for transplantation. Before the legislation, religious leaders (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  4.  69
    Organ Transplantation and Personal Identity: How Does Loss and Change of Organs Affect the Self?F. Svenaeus - 2012 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (2):139-158.
    In this paper, changes in identity and selfhood experienced through organ transplantation are analyzed from a phenomenological point of view. The chief examples are heart and face transplants. Similarities and differences between the examples are fleshed out by way of identifying three layers of selfhood in which the procedures have effects: embodied selfhood, self-reflection, and social-narrative identity. Organ transplantation is tied to processes of alienation in the three layers of selfhood, first and foremost a bodily alienation (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  5.  5
    Organ transplantation in Nepal: Ethical, legal, and practical issues.Alok Atreya, Manish Upreti, Ritesh George Menezes, Ambika Dawadi & Nuwadatta Subedi - forthcoming - Developing World Bioethics.
    In Nepal, live donor organ transplantation is only 14 years old with the first successful kidney transplant made in 2008 and a successful liver and bone marrow transplant made in 2016. However, transplantation of cadaveric cornea dates back to 1998. There are still no cases of animal-to-human organ transplantation in Nepal. There are stringent laws to regulate human body organ transplantation in Nepal which are amended from time to time. However, there is a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  11
    Solid-organ transplantation in HIV-infected patients.Scott D. Halpern, Peter A. Ubel & Arthur L. Caplan - forthcoming - Center for Bioethics Papers.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7.  23
    Organ transplantation and meaning of life: the quest for self fulfilment. [REVIEW]Jacques Quintin - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):565-574.
    Today, the frequency and the rate of success resulting from advances in medicine have made organ transplantations an everyday occurrence. Still, organ transplantations and donations modify the subjective experience of human beings as regards the image they have of themselves, of body, of life and of death. If the concern of the quality of life and the survival of the patients is a completely human phenomenon, the fact remains that the possibility of organ transplantation and its (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8.  46
    Introduction: Organ Transplantation—A Challenge for Global Ethics.Barbara A. Strassberg - 2003 - Zygon 38 (3):643-662.
    A social scientific interpretation of the development of global ethics is offered. Both spontaneous and intended mechanisms of the construction of such an ethics within the broader processes of globalization are analyzed, and possible theoretical foundations are suggested. The scientific and technological achievements that gave rise to the medical procedure of organ transplantation generated new questions and challenges that theologians, scholars of religion, natural scientists, and social scientists are now trying to resolve.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9. Organ transplantation.Arthur Caplan - forthcoming - Bioethics Briefing Book.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. Of organ transplantation: European attitudes.Harald Jung & László Hecser - 2008 - Romanian Journal of Bioethics 6 (3).
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Organ transplants, foreign nationals, and the free rider problem.Dena S. Davis - 1992 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 13 (4).
    There is strong sentiment for a policy which would exclude foreigners from access to organs from American cadaver donors. One common argument is that foreigners are free riders; since they are not members of the community whichgives organs, it would be unfair to allow them toreceive such a scarce resource.This essay examines the philosophical basis for the free rider argument, and compares that with the empirical data about organ donation in the U.S. The free rider argument ought not to (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. Introduction: Organ transplantation — defining the boundaries of personhood, equity and community.Patricia A. Marshall - 1996 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (1).
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Organ Transplants as Related to Fully Human Living and Dying.L. Harold De Wolf - 1973 - In Preston N. Williams (ed.), Ethical Issues in Biology and Medicine. Cambridge: Mass., Schenkman Pub. Co.; Distributed by General Learning Press [Morristown, N.J..
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  48
    Japan Organ Transplantation Law: Past, Present and Future.Alireza Bagheri - 2009 - Asian Bioethics Review 1 (4):452-456.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  14
    Islam, organ transplants, and organ trafficking in the muslim world: Paving a path for solutions.Debra Budiani & Othman Shibly - 2008 - In Jonathan E. Brockopp & Thomas Eich (eds.), Muslim Medical Ethics: From Theory to Practice. University of South Carolina Press. pp. 138--50.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Organ transplantation in Nepal: Ethical, legal, and practical issues.Alok Atreya, Manish Upreti, Ritesh George Menezes, Ambika Dawadi & Nuwadatta Subedi - forthcoming - Developing World Bioethics.
    In Nepal, live donor organ transplantation is only 14 years old with the first successful kidney transplant made in 2008 and a successful liver and bone marrow transplant made in 2016. However, transplantation of cadaveric cornea dates back to 1998. There are still no cases of animal-to-human organ transplantation in Nepal. There are stringent laws to regulate human body organ transplantation in Nepal which are amended from time to time. However, there is a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Organ transplantation.L. Wright, K. Ross & A. S. Daar - 2008 - In Peter A. Singer & A. M. Viens (eds.), The Cambridge Textbook of Bioethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 145--152.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Organ transplantation seen from the perspective of the phenomenology of corporeality.Jana Tomasovicova - 2012 - Filozofia 67 (1):15-25.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Human Organ Transplantation: A Report on Developments Under the Auspices of WHO (1987-1991). 18. Crouch, RA and E. Carl. 1999. Moral Agency and the Family: The Case of Living Related Organ Transplantation[REVIEW]World Health Organization - 1991 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8:275-287.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  91
    Organ transplantation: Contemporary sunni muslim legal and ethical perspectives.Abul Fadl Mohsin Ebrahim - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (3):291–302.
    The problems that organ transplantation poses to the Muslim mind may be summarized as follows: firstly, a muslim believes that whatever he owns or possesses has been given to him as an amānah from Alla¯h. Would it not be a breach of trust to give consent for the removal of parts of one's body, while still alive, for transplantation to benefit one's child, sibling or parent? Secondly, the Sharā'ah emphasizes the sacredness of the human body. Would it (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  21.  1
    Supporting organ transplantation in non-resident aliens within limits.K. A. Bramstedt - 2006 - Ethics and Medicine 22 (2).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  5
    Organ transplantation: Contemporary sunni muslim legal and ethical perspectives.Abul Fadl Mohsin Ebrahim - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (3):291-302.
    The problems that organ transplantation poses to the Muslim mind may be summarized as follows: firstly, a muslim believes that whatever he owns or possesses has been given to him as an amānah from Alla¯h. Would it not be a breach of trust to give consent for the removal of parts of one's body, while still alive, for transplantation to benefit one's child, sibling or parent? Secondly, the Sharā'ah emphasizes the sacredness of the human body. Would it (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  23.  73
    Organ Transplants from Executed Prisoners: Louis J Palmer Jr, Jefferson, North Carolina, US and London, McFarland and Company, 1999, 156 pages, pound26.25/$35. [REVIEW]Mark Hilberman - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (2):140-141.
  24.  41
    Organ Transplants, Death, and Policies for Procurement.David Lamb - 1993 - The Monist 76 (2):203-221.
    Organ transplantation has given hope when formerly death was inevitable. But the replacement of vital organs highlights major moral and philosophical problems in medicine concerning the role of physicians and nurses, patient autonomy, and respect for the dying and the dead. These include the morality of excising organs from a healthy donor, and related problems regarding an individual’s consent to have organs removed for the benefit of others. These problems are not restricted to live organ donation: cadaveric (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Organ Transplant in Present-Day Japan: Reasons behind Low Numbers of Deceased Donors.Justyna Magdalena Czekajewska & Aleksandra Jaworowicz-Zimny - 2020 - Diametros 18 (70):2-25.
    According to the International Register of Organ Donation and Transplantation, Japan is one of the countries with the lowest number of registered deceased donors. In 2019, Japan was ranked 61st out of 70 countries. The authors of this article have decided to explore the reasons for this phenomenon. In the first part of the work, religious influences (Shinto and Buddhism), the tradition of gotai manzoku, the importance of altruism and the family in the perception of death and (...) transplantation by the Japanese are considered. The second part of the article presents the arguments of Alan Shewmon, who believes that brain death is not death in the biological sense. Undermining the brain’s death criterion raises doubts concerning death of patients in irreversible coma, what in result discourages transplantology in Japan. In the third part, the authors compare the results of JOTN, IRODaT and the Fact Book of Organ Transplantation 2018 in Japan from 2010 to 2018. The aim of the article is to explain the cultural determinants of transplantology in Japan, taking into account the influence of philosophical and bioethical aspects of human death. (shrink)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Ethical Considerations in Organ Transplants.David L. Perry - manuscript
    The ability to keep someone alive by replacing one or more of their major organs is an astounding achievement of 20th-century medicine. Unfortunately, the current supply of transplant organs is much lower than the need or demand for them, which means that thousands of people die every year in the U.S. alone for lack of a replacement organ.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  1
    The Courage to Fail a Social View of Organ Transplants and Dialysis.Renée Claire Fox & Judith P. Swazey - 1974
    Written by a sociologist and a biologist and science historian, this text considers the social aspects of organ transplantation and chronic hemodialysis. Their research, begun in 1968, focused on the experience of research physicians engaged in this work, the "gift- exchange" social dimensions of these practices, and the impact of these technologies on society as a whole. This reprint of the 1978 edition includes a new introduction by the authors. c. Book News Inc.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  28. Arguments against promoting organ transplants from brain-dead donors, and views of contemporary japanese on life and death.Atsushi Asai, Yasuhiro Kadooka & Kuniko Aizawa - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (4):215-223.
    As of 2009, the number of donors in Japan is the lowest among developed countries. On July 13, 2009, Japan's Organ Transplant Law was revised for the first time in 12 years. The revised and old laws differ greatly on four primary points: the definition of death, age requirements for donors, requirements for brain- death determination and organ extraction, and the appropriateness of priority transplants for relatives.In the four months of deliberations in the National Diet before the new (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  29.  31
    Organ Transplantation: New Regulations to Alter Distribution of Organs.Daniel Luke Geyser - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (1):95-98.
    On December 17, 1999, President Clinton signed the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999, which instituted a 90-day comment period for the amended Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network Final Rule, a comprehensive set of guidelines that would affect how organs are allocated throughout the country. Barring further legislative action, the Final Rule, which has been over five years in the making, will be effective on March 16,2000.The Final Rule, issued by the Department of Health (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  9
    Organ Transplantation: New Regulations to Alter Distribution of Organs.Daniel Luke Geyser - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (1):95-98.
    On December 17, 1999, President Clinton signed the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999, which instituted a 90-day comment period for the amended Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network Final Rule, a comprehensive set of guidelines that would affect how organs are allocated throughout the country. Barring further legislative action, the Final Rule, which has been over five years in the making, will be effective on March 16,2000.The Final Rule, issued by the Department of Health (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  48
    Death, organ transplantation and medical practice.Thomas S. Huddle, Michael A. Schwartz, F. Amos Bailey & Michael A. Bos - 2008 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3:5.
    A series of papers in Philosophy, Ethics and Humanities in Medicine (PEHM) have recently disputed whether non-heart beating organ donors are alive and whether non-heart beating organ donation (NHBD) contravenes the dead donor rule. Several authors who argue that NHBD involves harvesting organs from live patients appeal to.
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  32.  23
    Organ Transplants and Ethics.Hugh Upton & David Lamb - 1991 - Philosophical Quarterly 41 (164):381.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  33.  14
    Organ Transplants: The Costs of Success.Arthur L. Caplan - 1983 - Hastings Center Report 13 (6):23-32.
  34.  51
    Commercial Organ Transplantation in the Philippines.Leigh Turner - 2009 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (2):192.
    Countries throughout Asia promote themselves as leading destinations for international travelers seeking inexpensive healthcare. India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, and Thailand are all trying to attract greater numbers of what their promotional campaigns call “medical tourists.” Government tourism initiatives, hospital associations, medical tourism companies, and individual hospitals advertise hip and knee replacements, spinal surgery, cosmetic surgery, and other medical procedures. In contrast to most nations marketing treatments to international patients, the Philippines differentiates itself by selling “all inclusive” kidney transplant (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35.  2
    Organ Transplants and Ethics.David Lamb - 1990 - Routledge.
    Originally published in 1990, this study of the moral problems bound up with transplant therapy addresses a finely balanced distinction between ethical issues relating to its experimental nature on the one hand and those which arise when transplantation is routine on the other. Among the issues examined are proposals for routine cadaveric harvesting, criteria for organ and tissue procurement from living donors, foetuses, non-human animals and current ethical problems with artificial implants. Written as a contribution to practical philosophy, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  9
    Organ transplantation: Contemporary sunni muslim legal and ethical perspectives.Abul Fadl Moshin Ebrahim - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (3/4):291.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  37.  47
    Organ transplant initiatives: the twilight zone.D. P. Price - 1997 - Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (3):170-175.
    Assessments of the acceptability of new transplantation practices require a pinpointing of not only the meaning of death, but also the timing of death. They typically perceive elective ventilation as occurring just prior to death and non-heart-beating donor protocols as operative just after death. However, such practices in fact highlight the general vagueness and ambiguity surrounding these issues in both law and ethics. Supply-side dilemmas in transplantation lend real urgency to this "life or death" debate.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38.  43
    A quiet revolution in organ transplant ethics.Arthur Caplan & Duncan Purves - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (11):797-800.
    A quiet revolution is occurring in the field of transplantation. Traditionally, transplants have involved solid organs such as the kidney, heart and liver which are transplanted to prevent recipients from dying. Now transplants are being done of the face, hand, uterus, penis and larynx that aim at improving a recipient's quality of life. The shift away from saving lives to seeking to make them better requires a shift in the ethical thinking that has long formed the foundation of (...) transplantation. The addition of new forms of transplants requires doctors, patients, regulators and the public to rethink the risk and benefit ratio represented by trade-offs between saving life, extending life and risking the loss of life to achieve improvements in the quality of life. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39. How is organ transplantation depicted in internal medicine and transplantation journals.Céline Durand, Andrée Duplantie, Yves Chabot, Hubert Doucet & Marie-Chantal Fortin - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):39.
    In their book Spare Parts, published in 1992, Fox and Swazey criticized various aspects of organ transplantation, including the routinization of the procedure, ignorance regarding its inherent uncertainties, and the ethos of transplant professionals. Using this work as a frame of reference, we analyzed articles on organ transplantation published in internal medicine and transplantation journals between 1995 and 2008 to see whether Fox and Swazey’s critiques of organ transplantation were still relevant.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  5
    Facilitating organ transplants in Egypt: An analysis of doctors' discourse.Debra Budiani - 2007 - Body and Society 13 (3):125-149.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  41.  26
    Organ transplantation: an ethical road map.James M. DuBois - 2002 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 2 (3):413-453.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  36
    Organ Transplant Trade: A Moral Examination.Seeiso J. Koali - 2015 - Open Journal of Philosophy 5 (5):261-267.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  34
    Organ transplantation.R. Munson - 2007 - In Bonnie Steinbock (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Bioethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 211--239.
    The ethical and social issues raised by transplants are so interrelated that the thread of any problem eventually leads to the whole tangled ball. This article, however, limits discussion to topics involving living donors in the United States. This restriction is not dictated solely by space constraints. Rather, the rise in the number of living donors gives a particular urgency to questions about informed consent, donor protection, and recipient needs. How we resolve conflicts of interest, address issues of consent, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  18
    Sharia law and organ transplantation: Through the lens of Muslim Jurists.Farhat Moazam - 2011 - Asian Bioethics Review 3 (4):316-332.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  45.  29
    Moral Evaluations of Organ Transplantation Influence Judgments of Death and Causation.Michael Nair-Collins & Mary A. Gerend - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (3):283-297.
    Two experiments investigated whether moral evaluations of organ transplantation influence judgments of death and causation. Participants’ beliefs about whether an unconscious organ donor was dead and whether organ removal caused death in a hypothetical vignette varied depending on the moral valence of the vignette. Those who were randomly assigned to the good condition were more likely to believe that the donor was dead prior to organ removal and that organ removal did not cause death. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  46.  11
    The Human Organ Transplantation Act in Bangladesh: Towards Proper Family-Based Ethics and Law.Md Sanwar Siraj - 2021 - Asian Bioethics Review 13 (3):283-296.
    The Human Organ Transplantation Act came into officially force in Bangladesh on April 13, 1999, allowing organ donations from both living and brain-dead donors. The Act was amended by the Parliament on January 8, 2018, with the changes coming into effect shortly afterwards on January 28. The Act was revised to extend a living donor pool from close relatives to include certain other relatives such as grandparents, grandchildren, and first cousins. The Act was also revised to allow (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47.  29
    Organ Transplant: Using the Free Market Solves the Problem.Walter E. Block - 2011 - Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 2 (3).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  13
    Organ Transplantation for Individuals with Neurodevelopmental Disorders.Kim J. Overby & Joseph J. Fins - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (2):272-281.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  21
    Organ Transplants and Ethics.V. Parsons - 1991 - Journal of Medical Ethics 17 (4):220-220.
  50.  26
    Organ Transplantation, the Criminal Law, and the Health Tourist.Jean V. Mchale - 2013 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (1):64-76.
1 — 50 / 1000