Results for 'Ordinary objects'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Ordinary Objects.Amie L. Thomasson (ed.) - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Arguments that ordinary inanimate objects such as tables and chairs, sticks and stones, simply do not exist have become increasingly common and increasingly prominent. Some are based on demands for parsimony or for a non-arbitrary answer to the special composition question; others arise from prohibitions against causal redundancy, ontological vagueness, or co-location; and others still come from worries that a common sense ontology would be a rival to a scientific one. Until now, little has been done to address (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   155 citations  
  2.  44
    Ordinary Objects.Amie Thomasson - 2009 - Analysis 69 (1):173-174.
    In recent analytic metaphysics, the view that ‘ordinary inanimate objects such as sticks and stones, tables and chairs, simply do not exist’ has been defended by some noteworthy writers. Thomasson opposes such revisionary ontology in favour of an ontology that is conservative with respect to common sense. The book is written in a straightforward, methodical and down-to-earth style. It is also relatively non-specialized, enabling the author and her readers to approach problems that are often dealt with in isolation (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   172 citations  
  3. Ordinary Objects and Series‐Style Answers to the Special Composition Question.Paul Silva - 2013 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 94 (1):69-88.
    The special composition question asks, roughly, under what conditions composition occurs. The common sense view is that composition only occurs among some things and that all and only ‘ordinary objects’ exist. Peter van Inwagen has marshaled a devastating argument against this view. The common sense view appears to commit one to giving what van Inwagen calls a ‘series-style answer’ to the special composition question, but van Inwagen argues that series-style answers are impossible because they are inconsistent with the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  4. Ordinary Objects.Daniel Z. Korman - 2011 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    An encyclopedia entry which covers various revisionary conceptions of which macroscopic objects there are, and the puzzles and arguments that motivate these conceptions: sorites arguments, the argument from vagueness, the puzzles of material constitution, arguments against indeterminate identity, arguments from arbitrariness, debunking arguments, the overdetermination argument, and the problem of the many.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  5. Do Ordinary Objects Exist? No.Trenton Merricks - forthcoming - In Elizabeth Barnes (ed.), Current Controversies in Metaphysics. Routledge.
  6. Debunking Perceptual Beliefs About Ordinary Objects.Daniel Z. Korman - 2014 - Philosophers' Imprint 14.
    Debunking arguments are arguments that aim to undermine some range of beliefs by showing that those beliefs are not appropriately connected to their subject matter. Arguments of this sort rear their heads in a wide variety of domains, threatening beliefs about morality, mathematics, logic, color, and the existence of God. Perceptual beliefs about ordinary objects, however, are widely thought to be invulnerable to such arguments. I will show that this is a mistake. I articulate a debunking argument that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  7. No Composition, No Problem: Ordinary Objects as Arrangements.Jonah P. B. Goldwater - 2015 - Philosophia 43 (2):367-379.
    On the grounds that there are no mereological composites, mereological nihilists deny that ordinary objects exist. Even if nihilism is true, however, I argue that tables and chairs exist anyway: for I deny that ordinary objects are the mereological sums the nihilist rejects. Instead, I argue, ordinary objects have a different nature; they are arrangements, not composites. My argument runs as follows. First, I defend realism about ordinary objects by showing that there (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  8. Finding Ordinary Objects in Some Quantum Worlds.Cian Dorr - manuscript
    This paper lays out a novel proposal about the metaphysical foundations of (non-relativistic) quantum mechanics, which has some elements in common with Everett's “Many Worlds” interpretation and some elements in common with Bohm's ”Pilot Wave” interpretation. The view agrees with the Everettians that the quantum wavefunction can be interpreted be interpreted as a <em>complete</em> description of the world in fundamental terms. But it holds that this truth of this description suffices for the existence of an <em>uncountable</em> plurality of “worlds” of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  9.  84
    Ordinary Objects, Ordinary Language, and Identity.Michael Ayers - 2005 - The Monist 88 (4):534-570.
    The thesis of this paper concerns the fundamental role of "ordinary objects" with respect to the structure of natural language. It ascribes their role as basic objects of reference to their being both natural and "given" individuals. Section 1 will summarize that idea. Further argument will be offered in Section 2. An objection appealing to physical theory will be answered in Section 3. Sections 4, 5, and 6 consider the implications of the thesis for current theories of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  10. Perception and Ordinary Objects.Alex Byrne - 2019 - In Javier Cumpa & Bill Brewer (eds.), The Nature of Ordinary Objects. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    The paper argues -- against the standard view in metaphysics -- that the existence of ordinary objects like tomatoes is (near-enough) established by the fact that such things are apparently encountered in perception.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11. Metaphysical Arguments Against Ordinary Objects.Amie Thomasson - 2006 - Philosophical Quarterly 56 (224):340 - 359.
    Several prominent attacks on the objects of 'folk ontology' argue that these would be omitted from a scientific ontology, or would be 'rivals' of scientific objects for their claims to be efficacious, occupy space, be composed of parts, or possess a range of other properties. I examine causal redundancy and overdetermination arguments, 'nothing over and above' appeals, and arguments based on problems with collocation and with property additivity. I argue that these share a common problem: applying conjunctive principles (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  12. Ordinary Objects in the Relativistic World.Thomas Sattig - unknown
    Can our ordinary conception of macroscopic objects be transposed to the framework of relativity theory? According to common sense, ordinary objects cannot undergo radical variation in shape, whereas according to a compelling and widely accepted metaphysical picture of ordinary objects’ shapes in Minkowski spacetime, they do undergo such radical variation. This problem raises doubts about the compatibility of the ordinary conception and the relativistic conception of the world. I shall propose to reconcile common (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  47
    Physicalism, Ordinary Objects, and Identity.Andrew Melnyk - 1995 - Journal of Philosophical Research 20:221-235.
    Any philosopher sympathetic to physicaIism (or materiaIism) will allow that there is some sense in which ordinary objects---tables and chairs, etc.---are physicaI. But what sense, exactly? John Post holds a view implying that every ordinary object is identical with some or other spatio-temporal sum of fundamental entities. I begin by deploying a modal argument intended to show that ordinary objects, for example elephants, are not identical with spatio-temporal sums of such entities. Then I claim that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  14.  79
    Ordinary Objects • by Amie L.Thomasson. [REVIEW]Stephen K. McLeod - 2009 - Analysis 69 (1):173-174.
    In recent analytic metaphysics, the view that ‘ordinary inanimate objects such as sticks and stones, tables and chairs, simply do not exist’ has been defended by some noteworthy writers. Thomasson opposes such revisionary ontology in favour of an ontology that is conservative with respect to common sense. The book is written in a straightforward, methodical and down-to-earth style. It is also relatively non-specialized, enabling the author and her readers to approach problems that are often dealt with in isolation (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. One's a Crowd: Mereological Nihilism Without Ordinary‐Object Eliminativism.Gabriele Contessa - 2014 - Analytic Philosophy 55 (2):199-221.
    Mereological nihilism is the thesis that there are no composite objects—i.e. objects with proper material parts. One of the main advantages of mereological nihilism is that it allows its supporters to avoid a number of notorious philosophical puzzles. However, it seems to offer this advantage only at the expense of certain widespread and deeply entrenched beliefs. In particular, it is usually assumed that mereological nihilism entails eliminativism about ordinary objects—i.e. the counterintuitive thesis that there are no (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  16.  16
    The Nature of Ordinary Objects.Javier Cumpa & Bill Brewer (eds.) - 2019 - Cambridge University Press.
    The metaphysics of ordinary objects is an increasingly vibrant field of study for philosophers. This volume gathers insights from a number of leading authors, who together tackle the central issues in contemporary debates about the subject. Their essays engage with topics including composition, persistence, perception, categories, images, artifacts, truthmakers, metaontology, and the relationship between the manifest and scientific images. Exploring the nature of everyday things, the contributors situate their arguments and the latest research against the background of the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  14
    Physicalism, Ordinary Objects, and Identity.Andrew Melnyk - 1995 - Journal of Philosophical Research 20:221-235.
    Any philosopher sympathetic to physicaIism will allow that there is some sense in which ordinary objects---tables and chairs, etc.---are physicaI. But what sense, exactly? John Post holds a view implying that every ordinary object is identical with some or other spatio-temporal sum of fundamental entities. I begin by deploying a modal argument intended to show that ordinary objects, for example elephants, are not identical with spatio-temporal sums of such entities. Then I claim that appeal to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Ordinary Objects – Amie Thomasson. [REVIEW]Alan Sidelle - 2008 - Philosophical Quarterly 58 (230):172–176.
  19. How Are Ordinary Objects Possible?E. J. Lowe - 2005 - The Monist 88 (4):510-533.
    Commonsense metaphysics populates the world with an enormous variety of macroscopic objects, conceived as being capable of persisting through time and undergoing various changes in their properties and relations to one another. Many of these objects fall under J. L. Austin’s memorable description, “moderate-sized specimens of dry goods.” More broadly, they include, for instance, all of those old favourites of philosophers too idle to think of more interesting examples—tables, books, rocks, apples, cats, and statues. Some of them are (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  20.  41
    In Defence of Ordinary Objects and a Naturalistic Answer to the Special Composition Question.Jonas M. Waechter & James A. C. Ladyman - 2019 - In The Nature of Ordinary Objects.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  21. The Deflationary Metaontology of Thomasson's Ordinary Objects.Jonathan Schaffer - 2009 - Philosophical Books 50 (3):142-157.
    In Ordinary Objects, Thomasson pursues an integrated conception of ontology and metaontology. In ontology, she defends the existence of shoes, ships, and other ordinary objects. In metaontology, she defends a deflationary view of ontological inquiry, designed to suck the air out of arguments against ordinary objects. The result is an elegant and insightful defense of a common sense worldview. I am sympathetic—in spirit if not always in letter—with Thomasson’s ontology. But I am skeptical of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  22. Amie Thomasson on Ordinary Objects.Lynne Rudder Baker - unknown
    Amie Thomasson has won well-deserved praise for her book, Ordinary Objects. She defends a commonsense world view and gives us “reason to think that there are fundamental particles, plants and animals, sticks and stones, tables and chairs, and even marriages and mortgages.” (p. 181) Ordinary objects comprise a vast array of things—natural objects both scientific and commonsensical, artifacts, organisms, abstract social objects.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23. Bare Objects, Ordinary Objects, and Mereological Essentialism.Mark Steen - unknown
    From five plausible premises about ordinary objects it follows that ordinary objects are either functions, fictions or processes. Assuming that the function and fiction accounts of ordinary objects are not plausible, in this paper I develop and defend a (non-Whiteheadian) process account of ordinary objects. I first offer an extended deduction that argues for mereological essentialism for masses or quantities, and then offer an inductive argument in favor of interpreting ordinary (...) as processes. The ontology has two main types of entities, masses of matter and processes. A cat, for instance, is shown to be a ‘catting’ process that migrates through distinct portions of matter, much like how a wave passes through distinct portions of water. I also show how the account solves the paradox of coincidence, the Ship of Theseus, fusion cases (e.g. Tib/Tibbles), and answers the Special Composition Question. (shrink)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24.  20
    Un-Debunking Ordinary Objects with the Help of Predictive Processing.Paweł Gładziejewski - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
  25. The Controversy Over the Existence of Ordinary Objects.Amie L. Thomasson - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (7):591-601.
    The basic philosophical controversy regarding ordinary objects is: Do tables and chairs, sticks and stones, exist? This paper aims to do two things: first, to explain why how this can be a controversy at all, and second, to explain why this controversy has arisen so late in the history of philosophy. Section 1 begins by discussing why the 'obvious' sensory evidence in favor of ordinary objects is not taken to be decisive. It goes on to review (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  26. The Paradox of Fission and the Ontology of Ordinary Objects.Thomas Sattig - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (3):594-623.
    What happens to a person in a case of fission? Does it survive? Does it go out of existence? Or is the outcome indeterminate? Since each description of fission based on the persistence conditions associated with our ordinary concept of a person seems to clash with one or more platitudes of common sense about the spatiotemporal profile of macroscopic objects, fission threatens the common-sense conception of persons with inconsistency. Standard responses to this paradox agree that the common-sense conception (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27.  57
    Amie Thomasson's Ordinary Objects[REVIEW]R. W. Fischer - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (2):296-302.
  28. Objects: Nothing Out of the Ordinary.Daniel Z. Korman - 2015 - Oxford University Press UK.
    One of the central questions of material-object metaphysics is which highly visible objects there are right before our eyes. Daniel Z. Korman defends a conservative view, according to which our ordinary, natural judgments about which objects there are are more or less correct. He begins with an overview of the arguments that have led people away from the conservative view, into revisionary views according to which there are far more objects than we ordinarily take there to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   82 citations  
  29.  11
    What Simulations Teach Us About Ordinary Objects.Arthur C. Schwaninger - 2019 - Open Philosophy 2 (1):614-628.
    Under the label of scientific metaphysics, many naturalist metaphysicians are moving away from a priori conceptual analysis and instead seek scientific explanations that will help bring forward a unified understanding of the world. This paper first reviews how our classical assumptions about ordinary objects fail to be true in light of quantum mechanics. The paper then explores how our experiences of ordinary objects arise by reflecting on how our neural system operates algorithmically. Contemporary models and simulations (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  60
    Chisholm’s Changing Conception of Ordinary Objects.Mark Steen - 2008 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 76 (1):1-56.
    Roderick Chisholm changed his mind about ordinary objects. Circa 1973-1976, his analysis of them required the positing of two kinds of entities—part-changing ens successiva and non-part-changing, non-scatterable primary objects. This view has been well noted and frequently discussed (e.g., recently in Gallois 1998 and Sider 2001). Less often treated is his later view of ordinary objects (1986-1989), where the two kinds of posited entities change, from ens successiva to modes, and, while retaining primary objects, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  31.  2
    A New Conception of Ordinary Objects and the Role of Their Identities in Perception.Jacob Caldwell - 2015 - E-Logos 22 (2):30-46.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. There Are Vague Objects (in Any Sense in Which There Are Ordinary Objects).Jiri Benovsky - 2008 - Studia Philosophica Estonica 1 (3):1-4.
    Ordinary objects are vague, because either (i) composition is restricted, or (ii) there really are no such objects (but we still want to talk about them), or (iii) because such objects are not metaphysically (independently of us) distinguishable from other 'extra-ordinary' objects. In any sense in which there are ordinary objects, they are vague.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Objects: Nothing Out of the Ordinary (Book Symposium Précis).Daniel Z. Korman - 2020 - Analysis 80 (3):511-513.
    Précis for a book symposium, with contributions from Meg Wallace, Louis deRosset, and Chris Tillman and Joshua Spencer.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  34.  14
    Leon HorstenThe Metaphysics and Mathematics of Ordinary Objects[REVIEW]Eric Snyder - forthcoming - Philosophia Mathematica:nkaa006.
    HorstenLeon* * _ The Metaphysics and Mathematics of Ordinary Objects. _Cambridge University Press, 2019. Pp. xviii + 231. ISBN: 978-1-107-03941-4 ; 978-1-10860177-1. doi: 10.1017/9781139600293.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  3
    The Double Lives of Objects: An Essay in the Metaphysics of the Ordinary World.Thomas Sattig - 2015 - Oxford University Press.
    Thomas Sattig develops a novel philosophical picture of ordinary objects such as persons, tables, and trees. He carves a middle way between classical mereology and Aristotelian hylomorphism, and argues that objects lead double lives. They are compounds of matter and form, and each object's matter and form have different qualitative profiles.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  36.  26
    Critical Study of Amie L. Thomasson, Ordinary Objects.Hanoch Ben-Yami - 2008 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 8 (2):267-279.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  34
    Review of Amie L. Thomasson, Ordinary Objects[REVIEW]Terry Horgan - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (5).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  14
    The Ordinary Concept of a Meaningful Life: The Role of Subjective and Objective Factors in Third-Person Attributions of Meaning.Michael Prinzing, Julian De Freitas & Barbara Fredrickson - 2021 - Journal of Positive Psychology.
    The desire for a meaningful life is ubiquitous, yet the ordinary concept of a meaningful life is poorly understood. Across six experiments (total N = 2,539), we investigated whether third-person attributions of meaning depend on the psychological states an agent experiences (feelings of interest, engagement, and fulfillment), or on the objective conditions of their life (e.g., their effects on others). Studies 1a–b found that laypeople think subjective and objective factors contribute independently to the meaningfulness of a person’s life. Studies (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39. Tropes and Ordinary Physical Objects.Kris McDaniel - 2001 - Philosophical Studies 104 (3):269-290.
    I argue that a solution to puzzles concerning the relationship ofobjects and their properties – a version of the `bundle' theory ofparticulars according to which ordinary objects are mereologicalfusions of monadic and relational tropes – is also a solution topuzzles of material constitution involving the allegedco-location of material objects. Additionally, two argumentsthat have played a prominent role in shaping the current debate,Mark Heller's argument for Four Dimensionalism and Peter vanInwagen's argument against Mereological Universalism, are shownto be unsound (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  40.  92
    The Objectivity of Ordinary Life.Sophie Chappell - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (4):709-721.
    Metaethics tends to take for granted a bare Democritean world of atoms and the void, and then worry about how the human world that we all know can possibly be related to it or justified in its terms. I draw on Wittgenstein to show how completely upside-down this picture is, and make some moves towards turning it the right way up again. There may be a use for something like the bare-Democritean model in some of the sciences, but the picture (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  47
    Ordinary Constraints on the Semantics of Living Kinds: A Commonsense Alternative to Recent Treatments of Natural-Object Terms.Scott Atran - 1987 - Mind and Language 2 (1):27-63.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  42. Fusions and Ordinary Physical Objects.Ben Caplan & Bob Bright - 2005 - Philosophical Studies 125 (1):61-83.
    In “Tropes and Ordinary Physical Objects”, Kris McDaniel argues that ordinary physical objects are fusions of monadic and polyadic tropes. McDaniel calls his view “TOPO”—for “Theory of Ordinary Physical Objects”. He argues that we should accept TOPO because of the philosophical work that it allows us to do. Among other things, TOPO is supposed to allow endurantists to reply to Mark Heller’s argument for perdurantism. But, we argue in this paper, TOPO does not help (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  43.  45
    Objects: Nothing Out of the Ordinary, by Korman, Daniel Z.: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015, Pp. X + 251, £40. [REVIEW]David Sanson - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 96 (2):416-416.
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  23
    Sidgwickian Objectivity and Ordinary Morality.Christopher Tollefsen - 1999 - Journal of Value Inquiry 33 (1):57-70.
  45.  58
    Hume on the Ordinary Distinction Between Objective and Subjective Impressions.R. Jo Kornegay - 1993 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 23 (2):241-269.
    Hume begins ‘Of scepticism with regard to the senses,’ Section 2 of the Treatise, Book I, Part iv with the claim that it is otiose to ask whether or not there are bodies since belief in their existence is unavoidable. The appropriate question is rather ‘What causes induce us to believe in the existence of body?’. For Hume, belief is lively conception. Hence, he is also undertaking to answer the logically prior question: What causes induce us to form the concept (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46. The Ordinary Language Basis for Contextualism, and the New Invariantism.Keith DeRose - 2005 - Philosophical Quarterly 55 (219):172–198.
    I present the features of the ordinary use of 'knows' that make a compelling case for the contextualist account of that verb, and I outline and defend the methodology that takes us from the data to a contextualist conclusion. Along the way, the superiority of contextualism over subject-sensitive invariantism is defended, and, in the final section, I answer some objections to contextualism.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   94 citations  
  47.  56
    Daniel Z. Korman, Objects: Nothing Out of the Ordinary[REVIEW]Asya Passinsky - 2019 - Philosophical Review 128 (2):241-245.
    This is a review of Korman's book. I focus on the argument from counterexamples in favor of conservatism, the debunking response to this argument, and the arbitrariness arguments against conservatism.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  8
    The Double Lives of Objects: An Essay in the Metaphysics of the Ordinary World. [REVIEW]Marta Campdelacreu - 2015 - Disputatio 7 (41):252-260.
    Campdelacreu_The Double Lives of Objects, by Thomas Sattig.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  49
    The Double Lives of Objects: An Essay in the Metaphysics of the Ordinary World. [REVIEW]Michael J. Raven - 2018 - Philosophical Review 127 (1):140-144.
  50.  21
    The Double Lives of Objects: An Essay in the Metaphysics of the Ordinary World, by Thomas Sattig: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015, Pp. Xiv + 259, £40. [REVIEW]Jack Ritchie - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 96 (4):828-831.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000