Results for 'On Passions'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  53
    Spinoza on Passions and Self—Knowledge: The Case of Pride.Lilli Alanen - 2012 - In Martin Pickavé & Lisa Shapiro (eds.), Emotion and Cognitive Life in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 234.
  2.  20
    Pufendorf on Passions and Sociability.Heikki Haara - 2016 - Journal of the History of Ideas 77 (3):423-444.
  3.  34
    Descartes on Passion Reformation.Basileios Kroustallis - 2005 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 87 (3):312-323.
    Descartes’ account of emotion conflict in the Passions of the Soul has recently been the subject of Shapiro’s essay (2003), who claims that agent evaluation of the human good operates as an explanatory factor for the reformation of existing mind-body associations. On the contrary, it is here argued that this passion reformation involves explicit reasoning processes, and that the tendency to promote the good of the human being either denotes the cause and not the reason for the original passion (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  55
    Hume on Passion, Reason, and the Reasonableness of Ends.Elizabeth S. Radcliffe - 1994 - Southwest Philosophy Review 10 (2):1-11.
  5.  9
    Descartes and His Critics on Passions and Animals.Evan Thomas - 2022 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 30 (5):773-796.
    Descartes’ theory of the passions has important connections to his view that nonhuman animals are automata. In this paper, I show how critics of animal automatism exploited these connections. I int...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  30
    William James on Passion and Emotion: Influence of Théodule Ribot.Louis C. Charland - 2019 - Emotion Review 11 (3):234-246.
    This case study in the history of “passion” and “emotion” is based on the writings of William James. James is famous for his (1884) theory of emotion. However, like his illustrious colleague, Théodule Ribot, he also recognized the importance of “passion” in psychology. That aspect of James’s work is underappreciated. Ribot explicitly defends the necessity of including “passion” in psychology. James does not go that far. But he does utilize a very similar concept in connection with the term “passion” and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  20
    Freedom and Enslavement: Descartes on Passions and the Will.Christopher Gilbert - 1998 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 15 (2):177 - 190.
  8.  51
    John Locke on Passion, Will and Belief.Michael Losonsky - 1996 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 4 (2):267 – 283.
  9.  1
    Echoes of Victimhood: On Passionate Activism and ‘Sex Trafficking’.Sealing Cheng - 2021 - Feminist Theory 22 (1):3-22.
    The sexually violated woman has become a salient symbol in feminist discourse, government policies, the media and transnational activism at this historical juncture. In this article, I seek to understand the conviction of anti-prostitution activists that all women in prostitution are victims, and their simultaneous dismissal or condemnation of those women who identify as sex workers. The analysis identifies the centrality of victimhood to the affective logic of women activist leaders in the anti-prostitution movement, and its embeddedness in discourses of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  52
    Is Non-Evidential Believing Possible? John Bishop on Passionally Caused Beliefs.Dan-Johan Eklund - 2014 - Religious Studies 50 (3):309-320.
  11. Spinoza on Destroying Passions with Reason.Colin Marshall - 2012 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (1):139-160.
    Spinoza claims we can control any passion by forming a more clear and distinct idea of it. The interpretive consensus is that Spinoza is either wrong or over-stating his view. I argue that Spinoza’s view is plausible and insightful. After breaking down Spinoza’s characterization of the relevant act, I consider four existing interpretations and conclude that each is unsatisfactory. I then consider a further problem for Spinoza: how his definitions of ‘action’ and ‘passion’ make room for passions becoming action. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  12.  7
    L’Amour, L’Ambition and L’Amitié: Marie Thiroux D’Arconville on Passion, Agency and Virtue.Lisa Shapiro - 2019 - In Eileen O’Neill & Marcy P. Lascano (eds.), Feminist History of Philosophy: The Recovery and Evaluation of Women’s Philosophical Thought. Springer. pp. 175-191.
    In this paper, I examine Marie Thiroux D’Arconville’s moral psychology as presented in two of her works: Des Passions [On the Passions] and De L’Amitié [On Friendship]. This moral psychology is somewhat unique as it centers human action on three principal sentiments: l’amour, which is best understood as lust or a physical love; l’ambition, the principal human vice; and l’amitié, a characteristic friendship proper to the truly virtuous. I aim to show that these three passions tell a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  5
    Spinoza on Reason, Passions, and the Supreme Good.Andrea Sangiacomo - 2019 - Oxford University Press.
    Andrea Sangiacomo offers a new understanding of Spinoza's moral philosophy, how his views significantly evolved over time, and how he himself struggled during his career to develop a theory that could speak to human beings as they actually are--imperfect, passionate, and often not very rational.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  14.  22
    'Learn Virtue and Toil'. Giovanni Pontano on Passion, Virtue and Arduousness.Matthias Roick - 2011 - History of Political Thought 32 (5):732-750.
    In discussions of early-modern notions of passion and virtue, the humanist movement has played only a minor role. However, it has its own characteristics and approaches to the problem of passion and virtue. The moral philosophy of the Neapolitan humanist Giovanni Pontano is a case in point. Pontano pronounces himself against the Stoic doctrine of the eradication of the passions. Although his moral psychology follows traditional conceptions of the passions as subjected to the rule of reason, it rather (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Socrates on Reason, Appetite and Passion: A Response to Thomas C. Brickhouse and Nicholas D. Smith, Socratic Moral Psychology. [REVIEW]Christopher Rowe - 2012 - The Journal of Ethics 16 (3):305-324.
    Section 1 of this essay distinguishes between four interpretations of Socratic intellectualism, which are, very roughly: a version in which on any given occasion desire, and then action, is determined by what we think will turn out best for us, that being what we all, always, really desire; a version in which on any given occasion action is determined by what we think will best satisfy our permanent desire for what is really best for us; a version formed by the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  16.  10
    Beyond Passion and Perseverance: Review and Future Research Initiatives on the Science of Grit.Jesus Alfonso D. Datu - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Grit, which is originally conceptualized as passion and perseverance for long-term goals, has been associated with optimal performance. Although previous meta-analytic and systematic reviews summarized how grit relates to performance outcomes, they possess considerable shortcomings, such as absence of summary on the association of grit with well-being outcomes; absence of discussion on social, psychological, and emotional mechanisms linking grit to well-being; and lack of elaboration on how alternative models can resolve fundamental problems in the grit construct. This integrative review provides (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  17.  53
    An Essay on the Nature and Conduct of the Passions and Affections, with Illustrations on the Moral Sense.Francis Hutcheson - 2002 - The Liberty Fund.
    An Essay on the Nature and Conduct of the Passions and Affections, with Illustrations on the Moral Sense (1728), jointly with Francis Hutcheson’s earlier work Inquiry into the Original of Our Ideas of Beauty and Virtue (1725), presents one of the most original and wide-ranging moral philosophies of the eighteenth century. These two works, each comprising two semi-autonomous treatises, were widely translated and vastly influential throughout the eighteenth century in England, continental Europe, and America. -/- The two works had (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   51 citations  
  18. On Mark Schroeder's Hypotheticalism: A Critical Notice of Slaves of the Passions.David Enoch - 2011 - Philosophical Review 120 (3):423-446.
    In Slaves of the Passions Mark Schroeder puts forward Hypotheticalism, his version of a Humean theory of normative reasons that is capable, so he argues, to avoid many of the difficulties Humeanism is traditionally vulnerable to. In this critical notice, I first outline the main argument of the book, and then proceed to highlight some difficulties and challenges. I argue that these challenges show that Schroeder's improvements on traditional Humeanism – while they do succeed in making the view more (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  19. Animal Passions and Beastly Virtues: Reflections on Redecorating Nature.Marc Bekoff (ed.) - 2006 - Temple University Press.
    Who hasn't wondered what it's like to be a dog or bird? Such questions seem unanswerable because we have no way of getting into an animal's mind. Marc Bekoff's work on animal behavior and mind draws world-wide attention for its originality and its probing into what animals might know as well as what skills are needed to live life successfully as a member of a particular species. Convinced that individuals of every species have some level of self-awareness, Bekoff embarks on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  20.  80
    Hume on Calm Passions, Moral Sentiments, and the "Common Point of View".James Chamberlain - 2022 - Hume Studies 47 (1):79-101.
    I argue for a thorough reinterpretation of Hume’s “common point of view” thesis, at least within his moral Enquiry. Hume is typically understood to argue that we correct for sympathetically produced variations in our moral sentiments, by undertaking an imaginative exercise. I argue that Hume cannot consistently claim this, because he argues that we automatically experience the same degree of the same moral sentiment towards all tokens of any one type of character trait. I then argue that, in his Enquiry (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  28
    Descartes on the Identity of Passion and Action.Joel A. Schickel - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (6):1067 - 1084.
    According to the standard Aristotelian doctrine of the identity of passion and action (Ipa), a passion and the action with which it is identified are distinguished through a distinction of reason, and both passion and action are located in the patient. Descartes has recently been interpreted by some scholars to be rejecting Ipa in favor of a view that throws into contention a dualistic interpretation of his philosophy of mind. This article contends that Descartes did hold Ipa, albeit expressed in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  22.  17
    “Passion” Versus “Patience”: The Effects of Valence and Arousal on Constructive Word Recognition.Anne Kever, Delphine Grynberg, Arnaud Szmalec, Eleonore Smalle & Nicolas Vermeulen - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 33 (6):1302-1309.
    ABSTRACTAccumulating evidence suggests that emotional information is often recognised faster than neutral information. Several studies examined the effects of valence and arousal on word recognition, but yielded partially diverging results. Here, we used two alternative versions of a constructive recognition paradigm in which a target word is hidden by a visual mask that gradually disappears, to investigate whether the emotional properties of words influence their speed of recognition. Participants were instructed either to classify the incrementally appearing word as emotional or (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  23.  66
    On Reason’s Control of the Passions in Aquinas’s Theory of Temperance.Giuseppe Butera - 2006 - Mediaeval Studies 68 (1):133-160.
    Contrary to the fairly standard view of Aquinas on temperance according to which this virtue habituates the concupiscible appetite to move in ways that accord with reason spontaneously, that is, independently of any immediate command from reason, the author of this paper argues that temperance is a virtue which "(1) disposes the concupiscible appetite to remain more or less still in the absence of any command from reason to move, thus preventing vehement, spontaneous passions of any sort, ordinate or (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  24.  27
    Hume on the Stoic Rational Passions and "Original Existences".Jason R. Fisette - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (4):609-639.
    I argue that Hume’s characterization of the passions as “original existences” is shaped by his preoccupation with Stoicism, and is not (as most commentators suppose) a ridiculous or trifling remark. My argument has three parts. First, I show that Hume’s description of the passions as “original existences” is properly understood as part of his argument against the possibility of passions caused by reason alone (rational passions). Second, I establish that Hume was responding to the Stoics, who (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  10
    Descartes on the Passions of the Soul and Internal Emotions: Two Challenges for Interoception Research in Emotions.Helena De Preester & John Dorsch - 2021 - Danish Yearbook of Philosophy 54 (1):65-92.
    On the basis of Descartes’s account of the passions of the soul, we argue that current interoception-based theories of emotions cannot account for the hallmark of a passion of the soul, i.e., that its effects are felt as being in the soul itself. We also pay attention to the epistemic functions of the passions and to Descartes’s category of emotions that are caused and occur in the soul alone. Certain passions of the soul and certain internal emotions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  74
    Hume on the Passions.Stephen Buckle - 2012 - Philosophy 87 (2):189-213.
    Hume's account of the passions is largely neglected because the author's purposes tend to be missed. The passions were accepted by early modern philosophers, of whatever persuasion, as the mental effects of bodily processes. The dualist and the materialist differed over whether reason is a higher power able to judge and control them: thus Descartes affirms, whereas Hobbes denies, this possibility.Hume's account lines up firmly behind Hobbes. Although he shies away from Hobbes's dogmatic physiological claims, he affirms all (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27.  41
    Hobbes on the Passions and Imagination: Tradition and Modernity.María L. Lukac de Stier - 2011 - Hobbes Studies 24 (1):78-90.
    This article introduces the doctrine of the passions in the Hobbesian work, showing its debt with tradition, especially the scholastic Aristotelian one, even if, at the same time, it offers some breach features with this tradition, which are also analysed. In addition, the fundamentals of imagination manifest themselves in the appetitive process, in Hobbes's doctrine as well as in the scholastic Aristotelian tradition, showing their similarities and differences.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28. Descartes on the Passions: Function, Representation, and Motivation.Sean Greenberg - 2007 - Noûs 41 (4):714–734.
  29.  26
    Plato on False Pleasures and False Passions.Patricia Marechal - 2021 - Apeiron 55 (2):281-304.
    In the Philebus, Socrates argues that pleasures can be false in the same way that beliefs can be false. On the basis of Socrates' analysis of malicious pleasure, a mixed pleasure of the soul and a passion, I defend the view that, according to Socrates, pleasures can be false when they represent as pleasant something that is not worthy of our enjoyment, where that means that they represent as pleasant something that is not pleasant in its own right because it (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  14
    Nietzsche on the passions and self-cultivation: contra the Stoics and Spinoza.Keith Ansell-Pearson - forthcoming - Continental Philosophy Review:1-21.
    Although the literature on Nietzsche is now voluminous one area where there has surprisingly been very little research concerns Nietzsche on the passions. This essay aims to correct this neglect. My focus is on illuminating Nietzsche on the passions in relation to his primary teaching on self-cultivation. To illuminate his position, I focus attention on examining his relation to Stoic teaching on the passions. If for Nietzsche the Christian mind-set involves a disturbing pathological excess of feeling, the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. On the Epistemic Role of Our Passional Nature.Frederick D. Aquino & Logan Paul Gage - 2020 - Newman Studies Journal 17 (2):41-58.
    In this article, we argue that John Henry Newman was right to think that our passional nature can play a legitimate epistemic role. First, we unpack the standard objection to Newman’s understanding of the relationship between our passional nature and the evidential basis of faith. Second, we argue that the standard objection to Newman operates with a narrow definition of evidence. After challenging this notion, we then offer a broader and more humane understanding of evidence. Third, we survey recent scholarship (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Aquinas on the Passions.Peter King - 2002 - In Brian Davies (ed.), Thomas Aquinas: Contemporary Philosophical Perspectives. Oup Usa.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  33. Kierkegaard on Faith, Reason, and Passion.Merold Westphal - 2011 - Faith and Philosophy 28 (1):82-92.
    Religious faith is often critiqued as irrational either because its beliefs do not rise to the level of knowledge as defined by some philosophical theory or be­cause it rests on emotion rather than knowledge. Or both. Kierkegaard helps us to see how these arguments rest on a misunderstanding of all three terms: faith, reason, and emotion.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  34.  10
    Passion: An Essay on Personality.Roberto Mangabeira Unger - 1986 - Ethics 96 (2):422-423.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  35.  72
    Hobbes on the Passions and Imagination: Tradition and Modernity.María Lukac de Stier - 2011 - Hobbes Studies 24 (1):78-90.
    This article introduces the doctrine of the passions in the Hobbesian work, showing its debt with tradition, especially the scholastic Aristotelian one, even if, at the same time, it offers some breach features with this tradition, which are also analysed. In addition, the fundamentals of imagination manifest themselves in the appetitive process, in Hobbes's doctrine as well as in the scholastic Aristotelian tradition, showing their similarities and differences.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. [Book Review] Passions and Constraint, on the Theory of Liberal Democracy. [REVIEW]Stephen Holmes - 1996 - Social Theory and Practice 22 (2).
    In this collection of essays on the core values of liberalism, Stephen Holmes—noted for his scathing reviews of books by liberalism's opponents—challenges commonly held assumptions about liberal theory. By placing it into its original historical context, _Passions and Constraints_ presents an interconnected argument meant to fundamentally change the way we conceive of liberalism. According to Holmes, three elements of classical liberal theory are commonly used to attack contemporary liberalism as antagonistic to genuine democracy and the welfare state: constitutional constraints on (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  37.  51
    Hurne on Tranquillizing the Passions.John Immerwahr - 1992 - Hume Studies 18 (2):293-314.
  38.  44
    Hume, Passion, and Action.Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe - 2018 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    David Hume’s theory of action is well known for several provocative theses, including that passion and reason cannot be opposed over the direction of action. In Hume, Passion, and Action, the author defends an original interpretation of Hume’s views on passion, reason and motivation that is consistent with other theses in Hume’s philosophy, loyal to his texts, and historically situated. This book challenges the now orthodox interpretation of Hume on motivation, presenting an alternative that situates Hume closer to “Humeans” than (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  39.  24
    On the Nature and Conduct of the Passions, with Illustrations on the Moral Sense, 1728.Luigi Turco - 2000 - Hume Studies 26 (2):354-355.
    In the last fifty years, increasing general and scholarly attention has been paid to Francis Hutcheson, usually referred to as “the father of Scottish Enlightenment.” In the English-speaking world, scholars have profited from a number of facsimile reprints of Hutcheson’s works, as well as from P. Kivy’s modern edition of the Inquiry on Beauty. In the last fifteen years the Inquiry on Virtue has been translated into German, both the Inquiries into French, the Inquiries as well the Essay on (...), Illustrations and the Letters between G. Burnet and Hutcheson into Italian. All these translations supply the variants found in different editions and provide readers with a number of aids. Their editors seem to share, to a greater or lesser extent, the idea that a text of the past is, first of all, an historical document to be respected in its integrity and to be understood in its historical context. This idea is also gaining credit in the English-speaking world, as is shown by the recent proliferation of critical editions of Hume’s, Smith’s and Reid’s works. Of course, there are opponents to this idea: it seems that historical integrity and readability of a text of the past are often considered to be in opposition. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  85
    Malebranche on the Passions: Biology, Morality and the Fall.Sean Greenberg - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (2):191 – 207.
  41. Intellectual Passions, Heuristic Virtues, and Shared Practices: Charles Peirce and Michael Polanyi on Experimental Inquiry.Vincent Colapietro - 2011 - Tradition and Discovery 38 (3):51-66.
    The central preoccupation of Peirce and Polanyi was to undertake an inquiry into inquiry, one in which the defining features of our heuristic practices stood out in bold relief. But both thinkers were also concerned to bring into sharp focus the deep affinities between our theoretical pursuits and other shared practices. They were in effect sketching a portrait of the responsible inquirer and, by implication, that of the responsible agent more generally. This essay is, in structure, a series of études (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  42. Hume on the Direct Passions and Motivation.Tito Magri - 2011 - In Elizabeth S. Radcliffe (ed.), A Companion to Hume. Oxford: Blackwell. pp. 185-200.
  43.  4
    The Impact of Entrepreneurial Passion on Psychology and Behavior of Entrepreneurs.Bing Feng & Min Chen - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  44.  4
    A Dissertation on the Passions: The Natural History of Religion : A Critical Edition.David Hume - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Tom Beauchamp presents the definitive scholarly edition of two famous works by David Hume, both originally published in 1757. In A Dissertation on the Passions Hume sets out his original view of the nature and central role of passion and emotion. The Natural History of Religion is a landmark work in the study of religion as a natural phenomenon. Authoritative critical texts are accompanied by a full array of editorial matter.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  45.  72
    Passionate Speech: On the Uses and Abuses of Anger in Public Debate.Alessandra Tanesini - 2021 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 89:153-176.
    Anger dominates debates in the public sphere. In this article I argue that there are diverse forms of anger that merit different responses. My focus is especially on two types of anger that I label respectively arrogant and resistant. The first is the characteristic defensive response of those who unwarrantedly arrogate special privileges for themselves. The second is often a source of insight and a form of moral address. I detail some discursive manifestations of these two types of anger. I (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  89
    A Dissertation on the Passions: The Natural History of Religion: A Critical Edition.David Hume - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Tom Beauchamp presents the definitive scholarly edition of two famous works by David Hume, both originally published in 1757. In A Dissertation on the Passions Hume sets out his original view of the nature and central role of passion and emotion. The Natural History of Religion is a landmark work in the study of religion as a natural phenomenon. Authoritative critical texts are accompanied by a full array of editorial matter.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  47.  22
    Glory, Passions and Money in Alberti’s Della Famiglia: A Humanist Reflects on the Foundations of Society.Hanan Yoran - 2015 - The European Legacy 20 (5):527-542.
    The article examines Alberti’s dialogue Della famiglia as a reflection on the foundations of ethics and politics from the perspective of humanist discourse. The polyphonic work presents and critically examines several views. The authorial voice of the text rehearses the traditional philosophical view the humanists inherited, according to which humans are sociable by nature. However, some of the interlocutors reject this convenient view, implying that it cannot be squared with the humanist critique of the premises of mainstream classical and medieval (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. The Passions.Robert C. Solomon - 1976 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    INTRODUCTION: REASON AND THE PASSIONS i. Philosophy? This same philosophy is a good horse in the stable, but an arrant jade on a journey. ...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   206 citations  
  49.  22
    Performative, Passionate, and Parrhesiastic Utterance: On Cavell, Foucault, and Truth as an Ethical Force.Daniele Lorenzini - 2015 - Critical Inquiry 41 (2):254-268.
  50. Ruling Passions: A Theory of Practical Reasoning.Simon Blackburn - 1998 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Simon Blackburn puts forward a compelling original philosophy of human motivation and morality. He maintains that we cannot get clear about ethics until we get clear about human nature. So these are the sorts of questions he addresses: Why do we behave as we do? Can we improve? Is our ethics at war with our passions, or is it an upshot of those passions? Blackburn seeks the answers in an exploration of guilt, shame, disgust, and other moral emotions; (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   322 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000