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  1. The impact of anxiety upon cognition: perspectives from human threat of shock studies.Oliver J. Robinson, Katherine Vytal, Brian R. Cornwell & Christian Grillon - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  2.  72
    The impact of induced anxiety on response inhibition.Oliver J. Robinson, Marissa Krimsky & Christian Grillon - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  3.  24
    Effect of attention control on sustained attention during induced anxiety.Christian Grillon, Oliver J. Robinson, Ambika Mathur & Monique Ernst - 2016 - Cognition and Emotion 30 (4).
  4.  14
    Anxiety makes time pass quicker while fear has no effect.Ioannis Sarigiannidis, Christian Grillon, Monique Ernst, Jonathan P. Roiser & Oliver J. Robinson - 2020 - Cognition 197 (C):104116.
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    Bigger” or “better”: the roles of magnitude and valence in “affective bias.Jack Love & Oliver J. Robinson - 2020 - Cognition and Emotion 34 (4):633-642.
    ABSTRACTNegative affective biases are thought to be a key symptom driving and upholding many psychiatric disorders. When presented with ambiguous information, anxious individuals, for example, tend...
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  6.  18
    The impact of threat of shock on the framing effect and temporal discounting: executive functions unperturbed by acute stress?Oliver J. Robinson, Rebecca L. Bond & Jonathan P. Roiser - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6:153123.
    Anxiety and stress-related disorders constitute a large global health burden, but are still poorly understood. Prior work has demonstrated clear impacts of stress upon basic cognitive function: biasing attention toward unexpected and potentially threatening information and instantiating a negative affective bias. However, the impact that these changes have on higher-order, executive, decision-making processes is unclear. In this study, we examined the impact of a translational within-subjects stress induction (threat of unpredictable shock) on two well-established executive decision-making biases: the framing effect (...)
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